The Theatre of Small Convenience

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The Theatre of Small Convenience
a
The Theatre of Small Convenience
Address Edith Walk
City Malvern, Worcestershire
Country United Kingdom
Coordinates 52°06′43″N 2°19′47″W / 52.11194°N 2.32972°W / 52.11194; -2.32972Coordinates: 52°06′43″N 2°19′47″W / 52.11194°N 2.32972°W / 52.11194; -2.32972
Designation World's smallest commercial theatre
Operated by Dennis Neale
Type specialist, puppetry
Capacity 12
Opened November 1999 (1999-11)
Website
www.wctheatre.co.uk

The Theatre of Small Convenience is a theatre in Malvern, Worcestershire, England. In 2002 it entered the Guinness Book of World Records as the world's smallest commercial theatre, seating up to 12 people.[1] It is less than half the size of the previous record holder, the Piccolo Theatre in Hamburg, Germany.[2][3]

The stage during a puppet show

The theatre is located in Edith Walk, Great Malvern. Local puppeteer Dennis Neale started work on the theatre in 1997,[2] opening for the first show in November 1999.[4] The theatre's name comes from the building's original purpose – it was converted from a derelict Victorian gentlemen's public convenience. It is trapezoidal in shape, 16 feet (4.9 m) long and from 6 feet (1.8 m) to 10 feet (3.0 m) wide.[2]

The theatre regularly hosts puppetry, professional and amateur actors, drama, poetry, storytelling and opera, and has become a regular venue of the Malvern Fringe Festival. In 2005 the theatre was chosen as one of the venues for an international puppetry festival.[5]

Productions[edit]

  • Quackery Codswollop (2002)[6]
  • Quing (2004)[7]
  • The Tale of the Snowcake Man (2004)[8]
  • Tempuss Tantrum (2006)[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Young, Mark C., ed. (28 September 2001). Guinness Book of World Records 2002. Guinness Publishing. p. 196. ISBN 0-85112-124-1. 
  2. ^ a b c Smith, Richard (15 March 1997). "Loo becomes a theatre of convenience". The Independent. Retrieved 2 January 2010. 
  3. ^ Young, Mark C., ed. (November 1996). Guinness Book of World Records 1997. Guinness Publishing. p. 146. ISBN 0-9652383-0-X. 
  4. ^ Neale, Dennis (22 July 2009). "The Theatre of Small Convenience". The Theatre of Small Convenience. Archived from the original on 2 January 2010. Retrieved 2 January 2010. 
  5. ^ "Theatre's key role in international festival". Droitwich Spa Advertiser (Newsquest Media Group). 13 May 2005. Archived from the original on 2 January 2010. Retrieved 2 January 2010. 
  6. ^ "Quackery Codswallop Review: Theatre of Small Convenience, Malvern". Malvern Gazette (Newsquest Media Group). 6 September 2002. Retrieved 31 December 2011. 
  7. ^ "No small convenience". Malvern Gazette (Newsquest Media Group). 9 September 2004. Retrieved 31 December 2011. 
  8. ^ "Theatre enjoys big hit with a sweet fairytale". Malvern Gazette (Newsquest Media Group). 17 December 2004. Retrieved 31 December 2011. 
  9. ^ "A convenient way to spend some time". Malvern Gazette (Newsquest Media Group). 30 August 2006. Retrieved 31 December 2011. 

External links[edit]