The Thief of Venice

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Il Ladro di Venezia
Directed by John Brahm
Produced by Robert Haggiag
Dario Sabatello
Written by John Brahm
Salvatore Cabasino
Jesse Lasky Jr.
Based on story by Michael Pertwee
Starring Maria Montez
Paul Christian
Massimo Serato
Faye Marlow
Aldo Silvani
Music by Alessandro Cicognini
Cinematography Anchise Brizzi
Edited by Renzo Lucidi
Terry Morse
Production
company
Sparta Films
Distributed by 20th Century-Fox (US)
Release dates
1950 (Italy)
November 1952 (US)
Running time
91 min
Country Italy
US
Language Italian
English
Budget $3 million[1]
Box office 1,745,680 admissions (France)[2]

The Thief of Venice or Il Ladro di Venezia is a 1950 Italian film directed by John Brahm. The US title was "The Thief of Venice".

It was released in the US two years after being made.[3]

Plot[edit]

In Venice during the Middle Ages, a beautiful tavernkeeper finds herself caught up in intrigue and a war between Italy and Turkey. Naval officer Christian turns into a thief to oppose craft Serato.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

The movie was an Italian-American co production.[4] Originally Edmond O'Brien and his wife Olga San Juan were mentioned as possibly starring in the movie which was being produced by Monte Schaff and Lou Appleton.[5] Douglas Fairbanks Jnr was also mentioned as a possible lead.[6] Eventually it was announced Nathan Wachsberger would produce (in Europe) from a script by Jesse Lasky Jrn, and that former Universal contract stars Maria Montez and Paul Christian would star.[7]

John Brahm signed to direct and Faye Marlowe and George Sanders were to play support roles, with filming to start in Italy on 1 November 1949.[8] Sanders eventually pulled out.[9]

The movie was shot on location in Italy with studio work done at Scalera Studios.[10]

Reception[edit]

The Christian Science Monitor said that "a series of coups, captures and escapes take place with a great deal of running about but very little inventiveness."[11]

The Washington Post called it "a rip snorting Western" style film.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b 'Thief of Venice' Provides Lots of Action -- In 1575 By Dorothea Pattee Post Reporter. The Washington Post (1923-1954) [Washington, D.C] 14 Mar 1953: 4.
  2. ^ French box office for 1951 at Box Office Story
  3. ^ The Thief of Venice at Maria Montez Fan page
  4. ^ Revue Beckoning Webb; Lesser Planning Series; Rains 'Barricade' Star Schallert, Edwin. Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) [Los Angeles, Calif] 17 Mar 1949: 23.
  5. ^ MOVIELAND BRIEFS Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) [Los Angeles, Calif] 09 June 1949: B11.
  6. ^ Israel Bids for Adler, Muni and Hecht Play; Rogers Seeks Star Packet Schallert, Edwin. Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) [Los Angeles, Calif] 30 Mar 1949: 15.
  7. ^ Jesse Lasky Jr. Plans Production in Europe; Bromfield Gets New Deal Schallert, Edwin. Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) [Los Angeles, Calif] 12 Aug 1949: A7.
  8. ^ Faye Marlowe Returning as George Sanders Lead; Ball-Arnaz Deal Sighted Schallert, Edwin. Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) [Los Angeles, Calif] 26 Oct 1949: 23.
  9. ^ Corey Pursues Romantic Course in 'Furies;' Italy Expedition Launching Schallert, Edwin. Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) [Los Angeles, Calif] 28 Oct 1949: 21.
  10. ^ Of Local Origin New York Times (1923-Current file) [New York, N.Y] 24 Nov 1952: 19.
  11. ^ Maria Montez Seen in Film Made in Italy R.N.. The Christian Science Monitor (1908-Current file) [Boston, Mass] 29 Jan 1953: 6.

External links[edit]