The Troubles in Dungannon

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The Troubles in Dungannon recounts incidents during, and the effects of, The Troubles in Dungannon, County Tyrone, Northern Ireland.

Dungannon was one corner of the infamous murder triangle during the Troubles.

Incidents in Dungannon during the Troubles resulting in two or more fatalities:

1969

1972

1974

  • 15 March 1974 - Patrick McDonald (21) and Kevin Murray (27), both Catholic members of the Provisional Irish Republican Army, were killed in the premature explosion of a land mine at Aughnacloy Road, Dungannon.
  • 13 May 1974 - Eugene Martin (18) and Sean McKearney (19), both Catholic members of the Provisional Irish Republican Army, were killed in a premature explosion, while planting a bomb at a petrol filling station at Donnydeade, near Dungannon.

1975

  • 21 April 1975 - Marion Bowen (21) and her brothers Seamus McKenna (25) and Michael McKenna (27), all Catholic civilians, were killed by a booby trap bomb in Marion Bowen’s future home at Killyliss, near Dungannon. Bowen was 7 months pregnant. The attack was claimed by the Protestant Action Force and has been linked to the "Glenanne gang".

1976

  • 17 March 1976 - Joseph Kelly (57), Andrew Small (62), James McCaughey (13) and Patrick Barnard (13), all Catholic civilians, were killed in an Ulster Volunteer Force car bomb explosion, outside the Hillcrest Bar, Donaghmore Road, Dungannon. The attack has been linked to the "Glenanne gang".

1979

  • 16 December 1979 - William Beck (23), Keith Richards (22), Simon Evans (19) and Allan Ayrton (21), all members of the British Army, were killed in a PIRA land mine attack on their mobile patrol at Ballygawley Road, near Dungannon.

1983

1984

  • 7 September 1984 - Robert Bennett (45), Protestant off duty member of the Ulster Defence Regiment, and Malcolm Cullen (23), a Protestant civilian, were shot dead at their workplace, a timber yard at Ballygawley Road, Dungannon.

1993

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Victims by search date, cain.ulst.ac.uk; accessed 1 May 2014.

External links[edit]