The Valley of the Shadow

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This page is about an American Civil war project. For other uses, see Valley of the Shadow (disambiguation)


The Valley of the Shadow is a digital history project hosted by the University of Virginia detailing the experiences of Confederate soldiers from Augusta County, Virginia and Union soldiers from Franklin County, Pennsylvania. William G. Thomas III and Edward L. Ayers, the creators of the project, have called it "an applied experiment in digital scholarship."[1] The site contains scanned copies of four newspapers from each of the counties in addition to those of surrounding cities such as Richmond and New York: the Staunton Spectator (Staunton, Virginia; Whig), the Republican Vindicator (Staunton, Virginia; Democratic), the Franklin Repository and Transcript (Chambersburg, Pennsylvania; Republican), and the Valley Spirit (Chambersburg, Pennsylvania; Democratic).[2] Elsa A. Nystrom and Justin A. Nystrom state about the site:[3]

...the digital article challenges the user to select their own path through the material, following what most closely aligns with their specific interests – “alternative readings” in the words of the authors. Initially, their use of the digital medium seems fairly straightforward until one realizes just how much is there, and as an extension, how much one might miss inadvertently.

References[edit]

  1. ^ William G. Thomas III and Edward L. Ayers. "The Differences Slavery Made: A Close Analysis of Two American Communities". University of Virginia. Retrieved 4 August 2011. 
  2. ^ "The Valley of the Shadow: Two Communities in the American Civil War". University of Virginia. Retrieved 4 August 2011. 
  3. ^ Elsa A. Nystrom and Justin A. Nystrom (July 2005). "Beyond the Valley of the Shadow: Taking Stock of the Virginia Center for Digital History". MERLOT: Journal of Online Learning and Teaching 1 (1).  PDF available here

Further reading[edit]

  • Alkalimat, Abdul, The African American Experience in Cyberspace: A Resource Guide to the Best Web Sites on Black Culture and History
  • Serge Noiret: "La "nuova storiografia digitale" negli Stati Uniti, (1999-2004)." in Memoria e Ricerca, n.18, January–April 2005, pp.169-185, URL: [1].
  • Serge Noiret: "Y a t-il une Histoire Numérique 2.0 ?” in Les historiens et l'informatique. Un métier à réinventer, edited by Jean-Philippe Genet and Andrea Zorzi, Rome: Ecole Française de Rome, 2011.

External links[edit]