The Volokh Conspiracy

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Eugene Volokh, founder of The Volokh Conspiracy.

The Volokh Conspiracy is a blog, founded in 2002,[1] covering legal and political issues[2][3][4] from an ideological orientation it describes as "...generally libertarian, conservative, centrist, or some mixture of these".[5]

In 2007, Andy Guess of the Inside Higher Ed wrote that it was "one of the most widely read legal blogs in the United States" and that it "probably has more influence in the field – and more direct impact – than most law reviews."[1]

According to Adam Teicholz of The Atlantic The Volokh Conspiracy, among other blogs, played an important role in influencing the view of Americans over the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.[6] In 2013 The Volokh Conspiracy appeared in ABA Journal's "Blawg 100 Hall of Fame".[7]

In January 2014 The Volokh Conspiracy migrated to the Washington Post and was moved behind a paywall in June 2014.[7] The Volokh Conspiracy retains full editorial control over its content.[8]

Contributors[edit]

Legal humor[edit]

In a parody of obscure, unfair, or legally unenforceable Terms and Conditions and the theory that violating these when accessing a website is a criminal offense, the blog has claimed since 2008 that it is not to be accessed by anyone with the middle name Ralph or anyone who has ever visited Alaska.[9]

References[edit]

External links[edit]