The Wall Live (2010–13)

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For the original Pink Floyd tour of The Wall, see The Wall Tour (1980-1981).
The Wall Live
Roger Waters en el Palau Sant Jordi de Barcelona (The Wall Live) - 01.jpg
Tour by Roger Waters
Start date 15 September 2010
End date 21 September 2013
Legs 6
Shows 98 in North America
91 in Europe
15 in Oceania
15 in South America
219 in Total
Box office US $458.6 million ($464.3 in 2014 dollars)[1]
Roger Waters concert chronology
The Dark Side of the Moon Live
(2006–2008)
The Wall Live
(2010–2013)

The Wall Live is a worldwide[2] concert tour by Roger Waters, formerly of Pink Floyd.[3][4][5] The tour is the first time the Pink Floyd album The Wall has been performed in its entirety by the band or any of its former members since Waters performed the album live in Berlin 21 July 1990. According to Cole Moreton of the Daily Mail, "The touring version of Pink Floyd's The Wall is one of the most ambitious and complex rock shows ever staged."[6] It is estimated that the tour cost £37 million ($60M) to stage.[6] The first leg of the tour grossed in North America over $89.5 million from 56 concerts. It was the second highest grossing concert tour in North America in 2010 and the 3rd highest grossing concert tour worldwide as of 2013.[7][8] As of 2013, the tour holds the new record for being the highest grossing tour for a solo musician, surpassing the previous record holder, Madonna.[9]

The tour opened 15 September 2010 in Toronto, and moved through North America before ending the first leg of the tour in Mexico City, 21 December 2010. The European tour began 21 March 2011 in Lisbon, Portugal, and ended 12 July 2011 in Athens, Greece. In 2012, the tour included Australia, New Zealand, and South America, resuming 27 January in Perth, and ending 1 April 2012 in São Paulo.[10] It was confirmed by Waters during an interview with Jimmy Fallon that he would be returning to North America for yet another leg of The Wall tour, beginning 27 April 2012 in Mexico City and ending 21 July 2012 in Quebec City on the Plains of Abraham, a former battlefield.[11][12] This last show in Quebec City was the second largest outdoor production of "The Wall" ever – the largest being the Live in Berlin show in 1990.[13] The tour returned to European stadiums again in summer 2013.[14] After the 21 September 2013 Paris show he claimed on stage this to be possibly the last The Wall show, confirming rumours that there will be no further tour dates planned for 2014.

Waters, a pacifist, has incorporated an increased emphasis on the show's anti-war message, and he has requested that fans send him pictures of loved ones who have died as a result of wars.[15]

Snowy White[16] (who was a session and tour musician with Pink Floyd in the 1970s, and was in the tour band for the original 1980–81 tour for The Wall) and Dave Kilminster[17] were the first musicians confirmed to be in Waters's touring band. Kipp Lennon, Mark Lennon and Michael Lennon of the band Venice were confirmed for backing vocal duties,[18] but Michael Lennon withdrew from the band due to rehearsal difficulties. He was replaced by cousin Pat Lennon, also of Venice. On 23 April, the full band line-up was announced on Roger Waters's Facebook page. Following a charity gig Waters performed with his former Pink Floyd bandmate on 10 July 2010,[19] he confirmed that David Gilmour would guest on "Comfortably Numb" at one show during the tour. Gilmour appeared at the 12 May 2011 show at The O2 Arena, London playing lead guitar on "Comfortably Numb" and mandolin on "Outside the Wall", on which they were also joined by Nick Mason on tambourine.

On 24 August 2010, The Times Leader newspaper of Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, reported that Waters and company were in town rehearsing for the tour at the Mohegan Sun Arena in Wilkes-Barre Township. This venue previously hosted pre-tour rehearsals and pre-tour concerts for such performers as Elton John, the Simon & Garfunkel "Old Friends" Reunion Tour in 2003 and AC/DC rehearsals in 2008 before the band's world tour.[20] There were no rehearsals or performances; the crew used the occasion to work out technical details. On 12 September 2010, there was a rehearsal performance at the Izod Center in East Rutherford, New Jersey for invited guests.[21]

Tour band[edit]

The Roger Waters Band, Kansas City, 30 October 2010 (from left to right, Kilminster, White, Joyce, Pat Lennon, Mark Lennon, Kip Lennon, Wyckoff, Roger Waters, Smith, Harry Waters, Carin, Broad). Behind the band is the "rubble" from the destroyed wall

The following musicians have played on the tour:[22]

  • Roger Waters – bass, lead vocals, acoustic guitar, trumpet on "Outside the Wall"
  • Graham Broad – drums, percussion, ukelele on "Outside the Wall"
  • Jon Carin – keyboards, guitars, lap steel guitar, programming, acoustic guitar on Outside The Wall.
  • Dave Kilminster – guitars, banjo on "Outside the Wall", bass on "Mother"
  • Snowy White – guitars, bass on "Goodbye Blue Sky"
  • Harry Waters – Hammond organ, keyboards, accordion on "Outside the Wall"
  • G. E. Smith – guitars, bass, mandolin on "Outside the Wall"
  • Robbie Wyckoff – lead vocals (songs or parts of songs originally sung by David Gilmour)
  • Jon Joyce – backing vocals
  • Kipp Lennon – backing vocals
  • Mark Lennon – backing vocals
  • Pat Lennon – backing vocals
  • David Gilmour – guest guitarist and singer at Waters' London O2 show, 12 May 2011, pre-recorded harmony vocals on "Is there anybody Out There" line.
  • Nick Mason – guest percussion at Waters' London O2 show, 12 May 2011.

Concert overview[edit]

Pre-show[edit]

The schoolmaster puppet in Kansas City, 30 October 2010

During the pre-show, in the American part of the tour, a man who appears to be homeless pushes a shopping cart around the aisles around the floor seats. He wears a flannel jacket and a cowboy hat, and makes small talk with the fans as he makes his way around the floor. His cart is full of empty soda cans and rubbish and a sign that reads different sayings that vary from show to show, including, "No thought control" on one side and, "Homeless people need money for booze and hookers" on the other. His cart also contains the original stuffed "Pink" doll from 1979.

The pre-show audio was 20 minutes of several clips from television sitcoms and cartoons like Family Guy as well as comedy routines from George Carlin. After the first leg of the North American tour, the sound collage was dropped and replaced with 20 minutes of music in the following order and has been the same for every show since, "Mother" by John Lennon, "Masters of War" by Bob Dylan, "A Change Is Gonna Come" by Sam Cooke, "Imagine" by John Lennon, "Strange Fruit" by Billie Holiday, and "People Get Ready" by The Impressions.

The show[edit]

During the homeless man's tour through the crowd, the pre-show music stops and the sounds of channel surfing can be heard. When the homeless man reaches the stage, the climax of the movie Spartacus is played. A spotlight shines on him and his cart as the sounds of the slaves each claiming to be Spartacus are heard. After which, the man throws "Pink" onto the stage.

For the European shows and all shows in 2012, the homeless man is replaced with two "soldiers", bearing the crossed hammer uniform, who bring the "Pink" puppet onto the stage and hold him throughout the Spartacus clip, before dumping him on the ground and marching off the stage.

As he does this, the audio transitions to a trumpet (later revealed to be Roger Waters) playing the melody of "Outside the Wall".[3] The trumpet playing lingers unaccompanied for about a minute, until the band bursts into "In the Flesh?" with no warning. Fireworks explode across the stage during the opening chords and stage hands with arm bands and flags bearing the marching hammers emblems rise up above the band on lifts hidden in the stage floor. At about mid-song, Waters emerges from the back of the stage, dressed in black. During the climax of the song, a scaled down Stuka Dive Bomber, suspended by a guide wire, flies into the wall and explodes in a fiery ball. During "The Happiest Days of Our Lives" and "Another Brick in the Wall (Part 2)" there is a giant inflated puppet schoolmaster, an icon from the original show, which plunges up and down and appears to walk via suspending guide wires. Local school children are brought out onto the stage to lip-sync and dance. From the Berlin 16 June show onwards, Waters sings an acoustic reprise of "Another Brick in the Wall (Part 2)" with lyrics referring to the killing of Jean Charles de Menezes before finally greeting the audience and telling them about the filming of the original Wall Tour shows. He then sings "Mother" to a video of him playing the song from the original 1980 tour. He refers to the video as "miserable little Roger." A giant mother blow-up designed on the look of the animated version is featured as well. The song has more of a political message than before, the words "Big Brother Is Watching You" are written on the wall, with the "Br" crossed off and replaced with an "M". After the line "Mother, should I trust the government?" the words "No fucking way" are projected on the wall, as well as a local translation in non-English speaking countries.

The initial projections shown during "Goodbye Blue Sky" caused some controversy. During the song, aeroplanes are shown dropping bombs shaped like Latin crosses, hammer and sickles, dollar signs, star and crescents, Stars of David, the Shell logo, and the Mercedes-Benz logo, with the addition of the McDonald's logo in later shows. The plane dropping dollar signs appeared directly after the plane dropping the Star of David. Although Waters said in Rolling Stone that there was no relevance to the order of the bombs, he changed the order after Abraham Foxman, president of the Anti-Defamation League, complained.[23] Waters stated, "Contrary to Mr Foxman's assertion, there are no hidden meanings in the order or juxtaposition of these symbols."[24] These visuals were changed at Waters' request for all future shows, to avoid any sensitive juxtapositions of the symbols used in the video. At the first show of the tour, while these symbols dropped from the plane they also dropped from the ceiling of the Air Canada Centre in little cut-out shapes of confetti that looked like the symbols from the plane. During the song "Don't Leave Me Now" the production features a giant wife puppet similar in design and execution as the Schoolmaster. During the first half on the show, The Wall is slowly built up brick by brick and as with the eighties tour, an instrumental called "The Last Few Bricks" that doesn't appear on the original album is played to give the stage hands extra time to build the wall. At the end of "Goodbye Cruel World", the last brick is put in place and the wall is completed across the stage. An intermission follows with photos and short bios of people lost in conflicts are projected on the wall.

Waters performing in front of The Wall during the guitar solo to "Comfortably Numb"

The second act begins with "Hey You" and is played with minimal visuals on the wall. The band performs, now hidden from the audience's view, from behind the wall. For the acoustic guitar solo piece "Is There Anybody Out There?" a brick is removed so that guitarists Dave Kilminster and G.E. Smith are visible. As "Nobody Home" begins, a section folds out of the wall revealing a small mock hotel room complete with a television, chair, lamp and unmade bed. Waters, in character as "Pink", sings the song while seated on a comfy chair that is on a platform extending from the wall. During "Vera" images of Vera Lynn are displayed on the wall, along with videos of young children being reunited with their veteran fathers. "Bring the Boys Back Home" features Dwight D. Eisenhower's American Society of Newspaper Editors speech. During "Comfortably Numb", Robbie Wyckoff and Dave Kilminster stand on top of the wall as David Gilmour did in the original tour – a performance reprised by Gilmour himself during a one-off appearance at the London O2 show on 12 May 2011. At the end of the song, the projection of the wall explodes and cinematic pillars rise.

The band plays "The Show Must Go On" dressed in black fascist attire complete with the Marching Hammers armbands.[3] Waters' trademarked inflatable pig is released, untethered, during "In the Flesh", and guided by remote control, floats around the venue.[3] Spotlights shine on the audience as Waters interrogates them, pointing out the "riff raff" in the room. Waters is projected onto the wall with a machine gun shooting the audience. During "Run Like Hell", images are displayed on the wall parodying the iPod lowercase "i" fad. Pictures of pigs are shown next to the words "iLead", dogs next to "iProtect", sheep next to "iFollow" (pigs, dogs, and sheep indicating their roles on the Pink Floyd album Animals), George Bush and other leaders next to "iBelieve", Hitler next to "iPaint", children next to "iLearn", and gravestones next to "iPay" among others. In all of the pictures, the subjects are wearing iPods. After this montage, the leaked footage from the 12 July 2007 Baghdad airstrike is played, displaying captions of the American pilots speaking and pointing out Reuters employees Saeed Chmagh and Namir Noor-Eldeen, whose cameras were mistaken for weapons; after the attack, a banner is projected onto the wall: "Namir Noor-Eldeen and Saeed Chmagh, We Will Remember You." A burst of gunfire sends it to the ground.

"Waiting for the Worms" features more of Gerald Scarfe's original animation from the film adaptation and tour, except that the infamous sequence of marching hammers has now been replaced with a new computer-generated, cel-shaded version. "Stop" abruptly blacks out the entire wall, with a lone spotlight shining upon the Pink doll from the beginning of the program, which is sitting atop the wall; it is then thrown off of its high perch to the ground.

Gerald Scarfe's animated sequence is displayed during "The Trial". As the song reaches its steady climax and with the crowd shouting "Tear down the Wall", the wall crumbles violently from the top down amid smoke while a flurry of red paper confetti (in the shape of the bomb symbols from earlier in the show) drops on to the audience. The band emerges from behind the rubble and plays "Outside the Wall" with a variety of acoustic instruments. (At certain shows on the Australian leg, the band plays a complete acoustic version of "Waltzing Matilda" immediately after "Outside the Wall" as a rare encore. Similarly, at the shows in Mexico, the band performed "Las Mañanitas" to the tune of "Another Brick in the Wall") Waters introduces the band to the crowd, they bow and then exit the stage.

Critical reception[edit]

Kevin Coffey of the Omaha World-Herald wrote:

Roger Waters and a cast of supporting musicians ... perform[ed] from start to finish one of the most commercially successful, beloved and ambitious art-rock albums in history ... as the show begins, the famous and enormous white wall is erected on stage, brick by brick, until it obscures the band and becomes a screen upon which a dazzling array of videos and visuals are projected. Technically, this was a nearly flawless show. The sound was clean and true. The original album and tour was about isolation. This time around, it was more anti-war, anti-capitalism and anti-poverty than about any kind of psychological issue. In addition to wild and slightly creepy animations from Gerald Scarfe, projections on the wall and video screens showed images of poverty, soldiers and others who died in conflicts as well as video of planes bombing areas with crosses, dollar signs, Shell Oil logos and others.[25]

J.C. Maçek III of PopMatters wrote:

As an immersive concert experience, however, The Wall is an entirely different beast. Its harsh, theatrical nature pulls the audience deep into its storyline and its visuals create the illusion of actually being inside a dynamic, frightening and engrossing movie. Yes, The Wall live is every bit as cinematic as its actual cinema-released counterpart film Pink Floyd – The Wall and will remain a milestone in Pink Floyd and Roger Waters history. The Wall Live has truly been more than a concert tour, but an anti-war, pro-music, theatrical, cinematic, brilliant, inspiring truly immersive, multi-media experience that compliments the history of The Wall and, perhaps, brings it one step farther in its story.[3]

Steve Pick of Stltoday.com said:

"Roger Waters did not put on just an ordinary concert Friday night at the Scottrade Center — he created a huge, technologically complex and metaphorically dense theatrical spectacle."[26]

Timothy Fin of the Kansas City Star has this to say about the show, " ... Waters accordingly turned the performance into a[n] epic, gaudy and extravagant piece of theatre – an onslaught of sights, sounds and socio-political themes. Some of it was poignant, some of it was bombastic, some of it was viscerally thrilling, like a great rock show ought to be. But all of it was entertaining."[27]

Kevin Stevens of The Setonian stated:

A hail of firework explosions, hundreds of large rectangular bricks, crashing planes, enormous puppets, 3D effects. Surely, this is not your average concert. Roger Waters' tour of his seminal album, "The Wall," lavishes in this Broadway-esque pomp, but never compromises its music for theatrics. This is a rock concert, one that succeeds in transforming Pink Floyd's brilliant 1979 opus into a compelling aesthetic and auditory experience.[28]

A.D. Amorosi of the Philadelphia City Paper wrote:

"If epic paranoia over monster themes such as megalomania, mother fixation, loneliness, television, the warring industrial complex and the uselessness of fans and celebrity, accompanied by the sounds of unsettling bombast, is what you seek as entertainment, there’s a bridge I can sell you. Or rather, a wall — The Wall, Roger Waters’ semi-autobiographical 1979 magnum opus ...[29]

According to Matt DeMarco of The Hofstra Chronicle online:

Pyrotechnics were used throughout the show, as were massive marionette puppets, representative of several of the opera's supporting characters. The technological aspect of this show was astounding. Musically, the show was just as phenomenal. Waters brought an impressive touring band with him, including lead guitarist Dave Kilminster, who was just spectacular. The solo he delivered during "Comfortably Numb" was absolutely mind-blowing. Waters, himself, proved that rock ‘n roll has no age limit. At 67 years old, the rock icon played a flawless show, hitting notes that he was hitting 30 years ago. His energy was visibly present; he was truly excited to be performing this album for a live crowd again.[30]

Set list[edit]

The Wall album is played in its entirety and two songs not in the original release are included—"What Shall We Do Now?" and "The Last Few Bricks"[31]—both of which were also played at every concert during The Wall Tour in 1980–1981, and documented on the album Is There Anybody Out There? The Wall Live 1980–81, released in 2000. "One of My Turns", "Don't Leave Me Now" and "Run Like Hell" are all transposed one key down to accommodate Waters' vocal range.

A change was made in the setlist from the Berlin 16 June 2011 show onwards, when Waters added an acoustic coda to "Another Brick in the Wall (Part 2)" with brand new lyrics referring to the murder of Jean Charles de Menezes. There has been no official announcement yet, but this is being nicknamed "Another Brick in the Wall (Part 2) Reprise". This is the first time ever a new song has been added to The Wall—all previous additions to the setlist of the original album either restored unused material (in The Wall film) or added existing songs from Waters' work (in The Wall – Live in Berlin).

Set one[edit]

  1. "In the Flesh?"
  2. "The Thin Ice"
  3. "Another Brick in the Wall (Part 1)"
  4. "The Happiest Days of Our Lives"
  5. "Another Brick in the Wall (Part 2)"
  6. "The Ballad of Jean Charles de Menezes" (June 2011 onwards)
  7. "Mother"
  8. "Goodbye Blue Sky"
  9. "Empty Spaces"
  10. "What Shall We Do Now?"
  11. "Young Lust"
  12. "One of My Turns"
  13. "Don't Leave Me Now"
  14. "Another Brick in the Wall (Part 3)"
  15. "The Last Few Bricks"
  16. "Goodbye Cruel World"

Set two[edit]

  1. "Hey You"
  2. "Is There Anybody Out There?"
  3. "Nobody Home"
  4. "Vera"
  5. "Bring the Boys Back Home"
  6. "Comfortably Numb"
  7. "The Show Must Go On"
  8. "In the Flesh"
  9. "Run Like Hell"
  10. "Waiting for the Worms"
  11. "Stop"
  12. "The Trial"
  13. "Outside the Wall"

Tour dates[edit]

Date City Country Venue Attendance Revenue
North America (first leg)
15 September 2010 Toronto Canada Air Canada Centre 40,922 / 40,922 $5,623,300
16 September 2010
18 September 2010
20 September 2010 Chicago United States United Center 45,653 / 47,487 $5,400,900
21 September 2010
23 September 2010
24 September 2010
26 September 2010 Pittsburgh Consol Energy Center 12,561 / 12,561 $1,316,224
28 September 2010 Cleveland Quicken Loans Arena 12,369 / 13,320 $1,229,950
30 September 2010 Boston TD Garden 34,120 / 34,626 $3,836,070
1 October 2010
3 October 2010
5 October 2010 New York City Madison Square Garden 36,704 / 36,704 $5,449,885
6 October 2010
8 October 2010 Buffalo First Niagara Center 13,718 / 13,718 $1,493,334
10 October 2010 Washington, D.C. Verizon Center 12,865 / 12,865 $2,017,970
12 October 2010 Uniondale Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum 21,147 / 21,147 $2,365,175
13 October 2010
15 October 2010 Hartford XL Center 11,647 / 11,647 $1,534,942
17 October 2010 Ottawa Canada Scotiabank Place 12,699 / 12,699 $1,346,000
19 October 2010 Montreal Bell Centre 27,210 / 27,210 $3,482,540
20 October 2010
22 October 2010 Columbus United States Value City Arena 12,010 / 12,010 $1,325,804
24 October 2010 Auburn Hills The Palace of Auburn Hills 13,481 / 13,481 $1,536,384
26 October 2010 Omaha Qwest Center Omaha 9,471 / 9,897 $898,513
27 October 2010 Saint Paul Xcel Energy Center 14,130 / 14,130 $1,704,884
29 October 2010 St. Louis Scottrade Center 12,574 / 12,574 $1,341,058
30 October 2010 Kansas City Sprint Center 11,458 / 11,458 $1,253,051
3 November 2010 East Rutherford Izod Center 25,690 / 25,690 $3,385,970
4 November 2010
6 November 2010 New York City Madison Square Garden N/A N/A
8 November 2010 Philadelphia Wells Fargo Center 39,280 / 39,280 $5,474,340
9 November 2010
11 November 2010
13 November 2010 Sunrise BankAtlantic Center 24,939 / 24,939 $2,956,233
14 November 2010
16 November 2010 Tampa St. Pete Times Forum 14,630 / 15,650 $1,784,297
18 November 2010 Atlanta Philips Arena 12,665 / 12,665 $1,772,797
20 November 2010 Houston Toyota Center 11,443 / 11,443 $1,541,128
21 November 2010 Dallas American Airlines Center 12,804 / 12,804 $1,673,754
23 November 2010 Denver Pepsi Center 11,801 / 11,801 $1,491,145
26 November 2010 Paradise MGM Grand Garden Arena 12,661 / 12,661 $1,992,350
27 November 2010 Phoenix US Airways Center 12,234 / 12,234 $1,428,183
29 November 2010 Los Angeles Staples Center 36,621 / 36,621 $5,408,750
30 November 2010
3 December 2010 Oakland Oracle Arena 12,579 / 12,579 $1,536,895
5 December 2010 Los Angeles Staples Center N/A N/A
7 December 2010 San Jose HP Pavilion at San Jose 23,209 / 23,209 $3,106,707
8 December 2010
10 December 2010 Vancouver Canada Rogers Arena 13,159 / 13,159 $1,940,070
11 December 2010 Tacoma United States Tacoma Dome 19,785 / 19,785 $2,194,338
13 December 2010 Anaheim Honda Center 23,854 / 23,854 $3,321,700
14 December 2010
18 December 2010 Mexico City Mexico Palacio de los Deportes 42,864 / 42,864 $4,788,270
19 December 2010
21 December 2010
Europe (first leg)
21 March 2011 Lisbon Portugal Pavilhão Atlântico 31,170 / 31,170 $2,593,376
22 March 2011
25 March 2011 Madrid Spain Palacio de Deportes de la Comunidad de Madrid 29,338 / 29,338 $2,135,012
26 March 2011
29 March 2011 Barcelona Palau Sant Jordi 28,738 / 28,738 $2,079,519
30 March 2011
1 April 2011 Milan Italy Mediolanum Forum 38,513 / 38,513 $3,888,218
2 April 2011
4 April 2011
5 April 2011
8 April 2011 Arnhem Netherlands GelreDome 88,693 / 88,693 $8,632,039
9 April 2011
11 April 2011
13 April 2011 Zagreb Croatia Arena Zagreb 17,004 / 17,004 $1,122,965
15 April 2011 Prague Czech Republic O2 Arena 29,095 / 29,095 $3,495,960
16 April 2011
18 April 2011 Łódź Poland Atlas Arena 26,231 / 26,231 $2,248,310
19 April 2011
23 April 2011 Moscow Russia SK Olimpiyskiy 21,894 / 21,894 $1,904,778
25 April 2011 Saint Petersburg SKK Peterburgskiy 15,998 / 15,998 $1,542,045
27 April 2011 Helsinki Finland Hartwall Areena 20,583 / 20,583 $2,291,537
28 April 2011
30 April 2011 Bærum Norway Telenor Arena 36,034 / 36,034 $5,597,370
1 May 2011
4 May 2011 Stockholm Sweden Ericsson Globe 23,212 / 23,212 $3,127,365
5 May 2011
7 May 2011 Copenhagen Denmark Parken Stadion 46,825 / 46,825 $5,151,114
11 May 2011 London England The O2 Arena 89,182 / 90,006 $10,232,800
12 May 2011
14 May 2011
15 May 2011
17 May 2011
18 May 2011
20 May 2011 Manchester Manchester Evening News Arena 36,817 / 37,050 $4,428,190
21 May 2011
23 May 2011 Dublin Ireland The O2 24,540 / 24,540 $2,370,038
24 May 2011
27 May 2011 Antwerp Belgium Sportpaleis 24,977 / 24,977 $2,703,230
28 May 2011
30 May 2011 Paris France Palais Omnisports de Paris-Bercy 56,764 / 56,764 $6,015,980
31 May 2011
3 June 2011 Mannheim Germany SAP Arena 16,444 / 16,444 $2,226,201
4 June 2011
6 June 2011 Zurich Switzerland Hallenstadion 39,811 / 39,811 $9,633,656
7 June 2011
10 June 2011 Hamburg Germany O2 World Hamburg 19,839 / 19,839 $2,605,683
11 June 2011
13 June 2011 Herning Denmark Jyske Bank Boxen 13,564 / 13,564 $1,595,402
15 June 2011 Berlin Germany O2 World Berlin 21,961 / 21,961 $2,734,176
16 June 2011
18 June 2011 Düsseldorf Esprit Arena 33,299 / 33,299 $3,784,690
20 June 2011 Munich Olympiahalle 9,888 / 9,888 $1,343,821
22 June 2011 Budapest Hungary Papp László Budapest Sportaréna 13,445 / 13,445 $1,333,913
24 June 2011 Zurich Switzerland Hallenstadion N/A N/A
25 June 2011
27 June 2011 Birmingham England National Indoor Arena 9,326 / 9,326 $1,142,757
28 June 2011 Manchester Manchester Evening News Arena N/A N/A
30 June 2011 Paris France Palais Omnisports de Paris-Bercy N/A N/A
1 July 2011
3 July 2011 Milan Italy Mediolanum Forum 21,005 / 21,005 $1,335,100
4 July 2011
8 July 2011 Athens Greece OAKA Olympiakó Kleistó Gymnastírio 35,005 / 35,005 $2,559,048
9 July 2011
12 July 2011
Oceania
27 January 2012 Perth Australia Burswood Dome 19,523 / 19,523 $3,637,000
28 January 2012
1 February 2012 Brisbane Brisbane Entertainment Centre 25,359 / 25,359 $4,268,040
2 February 2012
4 February 2012
7 February 2012 Melbourne Rod Laver Arena 38,586 / 38,586 $6,900,750
8 February 2012
10 February 2012
11 February 2012
14 February 2012 Sydney Allphones Arena 22,994 / 22,994 $4,314,050
15 February 2012
18 February 2012 Auckland New Zealand Vector Arena 39,096 / 39,096 $6,149,610
20 February 2012
22 February 2012
23 February 2012
South America
2 March 2012 Santiago Chile Estadio Nacional Julio Martínez Prádanos 93,926 / 94,875 $9,297,778
3 March 2012
7 March 2012 Buenos Aires Argentina Estadio Monumental Antonio Vespucio Liberti 430,678 / 444,906 $37,970,877
9 March 2012
10 March 2012
12 March 2012
14 March 2012
15 March 2012
17 March 2012
18 March 2012
20 March 2012
25 March 2012 Porto Alegre Brazil Estádio Beira-Rio 42,436 / 46,671 $5,950,540
29 March 2012 Rio de Janeiro Estádio Olímpico João Havelange 43,046 / 53,219 $4,839,180
1 April 2012 São Paulo Estádio do Morumbi 99,869 / 107,621 $12,512,600
3 April 2012
North America (second leg)
27 April 2012 Mexico City Mexico Foro Sol 82,811 / 82,811 $7,596,861
28 April 2012
1 May 2012 Houston United States Toyota Center 11,264 / 11,264 $1,365,855
3 May 2012 Austin Frank Erwin Center 10,230 / 10,230 $1,188,971
5 May 2012 Tulsa BOK Center 10,651 / 10,651 $1,198,062
7 May 2012 Denver Pepsi Center 11,800 / 11,800 $1,443,249
11 May 2012 San Francisco AT&T Park 33,193 / 33,193 $4,151,511
13 May 2012 San Diego Valley View Casino Center 10,219 / 10,219 $1,323,031
15 May 2012 Phoenix US Airways Center 11,585 / 11,585 $1,255,271
19 May 2012 Los Angeles Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum 45,751 / 45,751 $3,544,731
22 May 2012 Portland Rose Garden 12,275 / 12,275 $1,316,751
24 May 2012 Seattle KeyArena 12,006 / 12,006 $1,481,010
26 May 2012 Vancouver Canada BC Place 36,013 / 36,013 $3,820,182
28 May 2012 Edmonton Rexall Place 24,419 / 24,419 $3,085,732
29 May 2012
31 May 2012 Winnipeg MTS Centre 20,754 / 20,754 $2,384,855
1 June 2012
3 June 2012 Saint Paul United States Xcel Energy Center 12,889 / 12,889 $1,420,771
5 June 2012 Detroit Joe Louis Arena 11,406 / 11,406 $1,222,904
6 June 2012 Grand Rapids Van Andel Arena 9,388 / 9,388 $1,042,274
8 June 2012 Chicago Wrigley Field 36,881 / 36,881 $4,388,860
10 June 2012 Louisville KFC Yum! Center 12,547 / 14,666 $1,295,669
11 June 2012 Indianapolis Bankers Life Fieldhouse 11,248 / 11,248 $1,288,131
13 June 2012 Atlanta Philips Arena 10,707 / 10,707 $1,256,465
15 June 2012 Sunrise BankAtlantic Center 12,299 / 12,299 $1,522,098
16 June 2012 Orlando Amway Center 11,878 / 11,878 $1,383,781
19 June 2012 Nashville Bridgestone Arena 12,748 / 12,748 $1,356,251
21 June 2012 Buffalo First Niagara Center 12,996 / 12,996 $1,327,184
23 June 2012 Toronto Canada Rogers Centre 40,328 / 40,328 $3,876,736
25 June 2012 Ottawa Scotiabank Place 11,604 / 11,604 $1,239,283
26 June 2012 Montreal Bell Centre 14,305 / 14,305 $1,740,898
28 June 2012 Albany United States Times Union Center 10,963 / 10,963 $1,155,427
29 June 2012 Hartford XL Center 11,225 / 11,225 $1,421,495
1 July 2012 Boston Fenway Park 27,847 / 27,847 $3,620,675
3 July 2012 Pittsburgh Consol Energy Center 12,488 / 12,488 $1,269,078
6 July 2012 New York City Yankee Stadium 62,188 / 62,188 $7,375,030
7 July 2012
9 July 2012 Raleigh PNC Arena 11,913 / 11,913 $1,259,326
10 July 2012 Charlotte Time Warner Cable Arena 12,540 / 12,540 $1,256,734
12 July 2012 Washington, D.C. Verizon Center 12,901 / 12,901 $1,683,729
14 July 2012 Philadelphia Citizens Bank Park 36,773 / 36,773 $4,270,942
21 July 2012 Quebec City Canada Plains of Abraham 71,021 / 75,000 $7,391,936
Europe (second leg)
18 July 2013 Arnhem Netherlands GelreDome 6,343 / 10,000 $610,369
20 July 2013 Werchter Belgium Festival Site 35,881 / 40,000 $3,344,159
23 July 2013 Split Croatia Stadion Poljud 19,338 / 25,000 $770,476
26 July 2013 Padua Italy Stadio Euganeo 41,358 / 42,000 $3,624,011
28 July 2013 Rome Stadio Olimpico 50,848 / 52,000 $4,257,575
31 July 2013 Athens Greece Olympic Stadium 25,807 / 30,000 $1,453,804
4 August 2013 Istanbul Turkey İTÜ Stadyumu 25,438 / 30,000 $2,767,959
7 August 2013 Prague Czech Republic O2 Arena 13,621 / 14,200 $1,666,798
9 August 2013 Frankfurt Germany Commerzbank-Arena 26,422 / 29,000 $3,292,846
11 August 2013 Copenhagen Denmark Parken Stadion 35,575 / 40,200 $4,057,727
14 August 2013 Bærum Norway Telenor Arena 33,324 / 35,000 $4,630,713
15 August 2013
17 August 2013 Gothenburg Sweden Ullevi Stadion 30,766 / 35,000 $3,177,530
20 August 2013 Warsaw Poland Stadion Narodowy im. Kazimierza Górskiego 32,549 / 36,331 $3,008,068
23 August 2013 Vienna Austria Ernst-Happel-Stadion 36,385 / 40,000 $4,409,931
25 August 2013 Budapest Hungary Puskás Ferenc Stadion 18,720 / 30,000 $1,137,675
28 August 2013 Bucharest Romania Piaţa Constituţiei 44,813 / 44,850 $3,216,105
30 August 2013 Sofia Bulgaria Vassil Levski National Stadium 31,371 / 35,000 $2,053,674
1 September 2013 Belgrade Serbia Kombank Arena 12,400 / 14,000 $669,712
4 September 2013 Berlin Germany Olympiastadion Berlin 29,857 / 40,000 $3,299,137
6 September 2013 Düsseldorf Esprit Arena 33,727 / 35,000 $3,823,373
8 September 2013 Amsterdam Netherlands Amsterdam ArenA 47,414 / 47,500 $4,257,133
11 September 2013 Zurich Switzerland Letzigrund 37,367 / 40,000 $4,974,579
14 September 2013 London England Wembley Stadium 57,803 / 58,000 $6,385,728
16 September 2013 Manchester Manchester Arena 9,667 / 12,000 $1,119,528
18 September 2013 Dublin Ireland Aviva Stadium 24,210 / 30,000 $2,443,706
21 September 2013 Paris (Saint-Denis) France Stade de France 69,119 / 70,000 $6,853,334
TOTAL 4,129,863 / 4,268,028 (97%) $458,673,798

Image gallery[edit]

References[edit]

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