Accidental Death and Disability: The Neglected Disease of Modern Society

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This article is about a specific report. For the generic term, see White paper. For other uses, see White paper (disambiguation).

Accidental Death and Disability: The Neglected Disease of Modern Society, more commonly known as The White Paper, was an influential report published in 1966 by the National Academy of Sciences that is considered a landmark in the development of the emergency medical services system in the United States.[1]

The National Academy of Sciences—National Research Council Committees on Trauma and Shock, a federally funded department of the government, published the report of their research which concluded, in part, that both the public and government were "insensitive to the magnitude of the problem of accidental death and injury" in the U.S.; that the standards to which ambulance services were held were diverse and "often low"; and that "most ambulances used in this country are unsuitable, have incomplete … equipment, carry inadequate supplies, and are manned by untrained attendants."[2]

The report led to the design and implementation of the first federally qualified ambulance services and personnel. The reforms inaugurated by the publication of "The White Paper" led to higher quality care provided on-scene and in-transit by trained paramedics and EMTs.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mike Touchstone. "EMS in America: The Foundation Documents". EMS1.com. Retrieved 2010-02-21. 
  2. ^ Division of Medical Sciences, Committee on Trauma and Committee on Shock (September 1966), Accidental Death and Disability: The Neglected Disease of Modern Society, Washington, D.C.: National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council 

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