The Women's Philharmonic

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The Women's Philharmonic (TWP)
Orchestra
Founded 1981
Disbanded 2004
Location San Francisco, California

The Women's Philharmonic (TWP) was a San Francisco-based, professional orchestra founded by Miriam Abrams, Elizabeth Seja Min and Nan Washburn in 1981 and disbanded in 2004.[1]

History[edit]

Originally known as the Bay Area Women's Philharmonic, the orchestra's repertoire consisted almost entirely of works by more than 150 women, including more than 130 premiere performances and more than 40 commissions.[2] Its mission was "to change the face of what is played in every concert hall by incorporating works by women composers into the orchestral repertoire."[3] TWP's long list of accomplishments includes multiple awards for Adventurous Programming from ASCAP and the American Symphony Orchestra League.

In 2008, the Women's Philharmonic Advocacy was formed "in order to recognize the achievement of The Women's Philharmonic (1980-2004) over their 24 years of activity, to build on this work by advocating for the performance of women composers by orchestras and ensembles, to address the place of women composers (historic and contemporary) in today's repertoire of orchestras and ensembles in the US and internationally, and to present information that highlights the shortage of programming of works by women; the heritage of The Women's Philharmonic emphasizes that this should and can be corrected." [4]

Remaining in existence is the Community Women's Orchestra, which was founded in 1985 by Nan Washburn as an adjunct to The Women's Philharmonic.

Leadership[edit]

Music directors[edit]

Guest conductors[edit]

Recordings[edit]

  • Baroquen Treasures (1993)
  • The Women's Philharmonic Recordings
  • The Women's Philharmonic: Mendelssohn, Schumann (1993, Koch International Classics 7169)
  • The Music of Chen Yi (1997)
  • The Music of Florence Price (2001, Koch International Classics 7518)

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ Kosman, Joshua (March 4, 2004). "R.I.P., Women's Philharmonic, you were the perfect blend of achievement and idealism". San Francisco Chronicle, Page E1, March 4, 2004. Retrieved 2007-04-04. 
  2. ^ Iverson, Jon. "National Women Conductors Initiative Announced". Stereophile, July 12, 1998 — June, 1998. Retrieved 2007-04-04. 
  3. ^ Blomdahl, Katrina. "The Women's Philharmonic: Historical". The-Compound.org. Retrieved 2007-04-04. 
  4. ^ See: http://www.rebeccaclarke.org/wophil/

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]