The Woods (album)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The Woods
Studio album by Sleater-Kinney
Released May 24, 2005
Recorded November – December 2004
Genre Indie rock
Length 48:03
Label Sub Pop
Producer Dave Fridmann
Sleater-Kinney chronology
One Beat
(2002)
The Woods
(2005)

The Woods is the seventh and final studio album by the American rock band Sleater-Kinney, released on May 24, 2005 by Sub Pop. It was produced by Dave Fridmann and recorded from November 2004 to December 2004 at Tarbox Road Studios in Cassadaga, New York. The album received widespread critical acclaim.

Recording and release[edit]

The Woods was produced by Dave Fridmann and recorded from November 2004 to December 2004 at Tarbox Road Studios in Cassadaga, New York. Much of the album was recorded live in the studio, as Fridmann consciously attempted to approximate the band's live sound on the record. The vocals and some of the guitar tracks were the only overdubs. The final two tracks, "Let's Call It Love" and "Night Light", were separate tracks on record but were actually recorded together in a single 15-minute take, after Carrie Brownstein realized that the two tracks were in the same key and could segue into one another.[1]

The Woods was released on May 24, 2005 by Sub Pop, making it the band's first release on that label.[2] Two songs from the album, "Entertain" and "Jumpers", were released as singles on May 10, 2005 and September 12, 2005 respectively.[3][4] The album reached #80 on the US Billboard Top 200 chart and #2 on the Independent Albums chart.[5] As of October 2005, The Woods has sold 59,000 copies in the U.S. according to Nielsen SoundScan.[6]

Critical reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Aggregate scores
Source Rating
Metacritic 88/100[7]
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4.5/5 stars[8]
Robert Christgau A[9]
The Guardian 4/5 stars[10]
Pitchfork Media 9.0/10[11]
Rolling Stone 4/5 stars[12]
Stylus Magazine B-[13]

The Woods received widespread critical acclaim. Kyle Ryan, writing for The A.V. Club, described the album as "a quasi-psychedelic, classic-rock-sounding epic",[14] while Keith Harris of The Village Voice praised Corin Tucker's vocals.[15] The album appeared at number four in The Village Voice's Pazz & Jop critics' poll for 2005.[16] Pitchfork placed it at number 127 on its list of "The Top 200 Albums of the 2000s".[17] Similarly, Rolling Stone ranked The Woods at number 72 on its list of "100 Best Albums of the 2000s",[18] and Tiny Mix Tapes placed it at number 89 on its list of "Favorite 100 Albums of the 2000s".[19]

Track listing[edit]

All music composed by Sleater-Kinney.

No. Title Length
1. "The Fox"   3:25
2. "Wilderness"   3:40
3. "What's Mine Is Yours"   4:58
4. "Jumpers"   4:24
5. "Modern Girl"   3:01
6. "Entertain"   4:55
7. "Rollercoaster"   4:55
8. "Steep Air"   4:04
9. "Let's Call It Love"   11:01
10. "Night Light"   3:40
Total length:
48:03

Personnel[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Eddie Vedder (April–May 2005). "Divine Trinity". Magnet. Archived from the original on 2013-03-18. Retrieved 2014-04-07. 
  2. ^ "Sleater-Kinney - The Woods". Sub Pop. Archived from the original on 2013-04-07. Retrieved 2013-09-04. 
  3. ^ "Sleater-Kinney - Entertain". Sub Pop. Archived from the original on 2013-09-04. Retrieved 2013-09-04. 
  4. ^ "Sleater-Kinney - Jumpers". Sub Pop. Archived from the original on 2013-01-28. Retrieved 2013-09-04. 
  5. ^ "Sleater-Kinney - Awards". Allmusic. Archived from the original on 2013-06-17. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  6. ^ "Sleater-Kinney Postpones European Tour". Billboard. 2005-10-25. Archived from the original on 2013-09-14. Retrieved 2013-09-14. 
  7. ^ "The Woods". Metacritic. Archived from the original on 2013-10-14. Retrieved 2013-10-14. 
  8. ^ Heather Phares. "The Woods". Allmusic. Archived from the original on 2012-06-22. Retrieved 2013-10-14. 
  9. ^ Robert Christgau. "Sleater-Kinney". Robert Christgau website. Archived from the original on 2012-07-28. Retrieved 2013-10-14. 
  10. ^ Betty Clarke (2005-05-20). "Sleater-Kinney, The Woods". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 2013-10-14. Retrieved 2013-10-14. 
  11. ^ Stephen M. Deusner (2005-05-24). "The Woods". Pitchfork Media. Archived from the original on 2013-05-12. Retrieved 2013-10-14. 
  12. ^ Jonathan Ringen (2005-05-19). "The Woods". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on 2005-10-28. Retrieved 2005-10-28. 
  13. ^ Anthony Miccio (2005-05-24). "The Woods". Stylus Magazine. Archived from the original on 2012-10-18. Retrieved 2013-10-14. 
  14. ^ Kyle Ryan (2005-05-24). "The Woods". The A.V. Club. Archived from the original on 2012-04-07. Retrieved 2013-10-14. 
  15. ^ Keith Harris (2005-05-10). "Unsprung". The Village Voice. Archived from the original on 2012-09-27. Retrieved 2013-10-14. 
  16. ^ "The 2005 Pazz & Jop Critics Poll". The Village Voice. 2006-02-07. Archived from the original on 2013-08-15. Retrieved 2013-10-15. 
  17. ^ "The Top 200 Albums of the 2000s: 150-101". Pitchfork Media. 2009-09-29. Archived from the original on 2013-02-07. Retrieved 2013-10-14. 
  18. ^ "100 Best Albums of the 2000s; 72, Sleater-Kinney, The Woods". Rolling Stone. 2011-07-19. Archived from the original on 2013-04-25. Retrieved 2013-10-14. 
  19. ^ Heidi Vanderslice (February 2010). "Favorite 100 Albums of 2000-2009: 100-81". Tiny Mix Tapes. Archived from the original on 2013-06-23. Retrieved 2013-10-14. 

External links[edit]