The Yale Record

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The Yale Record
Cigarowl.gif
"Old Owl", The Record's "mascot"
Categories Humor magazine
Founder Edward Anthony Bradford
James Heartt VanBuren
Samuel J. Elder
E.H. Lemis[1]
Henry Ward Beecher Howard[2]
Year founded 1872, Yale University
First issue September 1872
Based in New Haven, Connecticut
Language English
Website www.yalerecord.org

The Yale Record is the campus humor magazine of Yale University. Founded in 1872, it became the oldest humor magazine in the world when Punch folded in 2002.[3][4]

History[edit]

King Kong (1933) was written by Record editor James Ashmore Creelman

The Record began as a weekly newspaper, with its first issue appearing on September 11, 1872. Almost immediately, it became a home to funny writing (often in verse form), and later, when printing technology made it practical, humorous illustrations. The Record thrived immediately, and by the turn of the century had a wide circulation outside of New Haven—at prep schools, other college towns, and even New York City.

As Yale became one of the bellwethers of collegiate taste and fashion (especially for the younger universities looking East), so too The Record became a model—F. Scott Fitzgerald referred to the magazine as one of the harbingers of the new, looser morality of collegians of that time. But it wasn't just laughs The Record was serving up—during the 1920s, The Record ran a popular speakeasy in the basement of its building at 254 York Street (designed by Lorenzo Hamilton and completed in 1928).[4]

Even in 1874, New Haven had a gang problem.

Early 20th century[edit]

Along with the Princeton Tiger Magazine (1878), the Stanford Chaparral (1899), and the Harvard Lampoon (1876), among many college humor magazines, The Record created a wide-ranging, absurdist style of comedy which mixed high-culture references with material dealing with the eternal topics of schoolwork, alcohol, and sex (or lack thereof). Comedy first published in the magazine was re-printed in national humor magazines like Puck[5] and Judge.[6]

At first petting was a desperate adventure...As early as 1917, there were references to such sweet and casual dalliance in any number of The Yale Record...

F. Scott Fitzgerald, "Echoes of the Jazz Age" (November 1931)[7]

In 1914, J.L. Butler of The Yale Record and Richard Sanger of The Harvard Lampoon created the first annual banquet of the College Comics Association, which drew representatives from 14 college humor magazines to New Haven.[8] The college humor style influenced—or in some cases led directly to—the Marx Brothers, The New Yorker, Playboy, Mad magazine, underground comics, National Lampoon, The Second City, and Saturday Night Live.[4]

The character "Whit" (pronounced "wit") in the Sinclair Lewis story Go East, Young Man drew caricatures for the Yale Record.[9]

Mid-Twentieth Century[edit]

Cover of the September 1925 issue of College Humor

From the 1920s to the 1960s, The Record placed special emphasis on cartooning, which led many of its alumni to work at Esquire magazine and especially The New Yorker. Record cartoonists during this time period included Peter Arno, Reginald Marsh, Clarence Day, Julien Dedman, Robert C. Osborn, James Stevenson, William Hamilton and Garry Trudeau.

From 1920 through the 1940s, many Record staffers and alums contributed to College Humor, a popular nationally distributed humor magazine. Additionally, comedy first published in The Record was re-printed in national humor magazines like Life[10] and College Humor.

By the late 1940s, the magazine's ties to The New Yorker were so strong that designers from that magazine consulted on The Record's layout and design.

Cover of the June 1961 issue of Help!

By the 1950s, the Record had established the "Cartoonist of the Year" award, which brought people like Walt Kelly, the creator of Pogo, to New Haven to dine and swap stories with the staff.

In the early 1960s, cartoons and comic writing from the magazine were regularly re-printed in Harvey Kurtzman's Help!,[11] a satirical magazine that helped launch the careers of Monty Python's Terry Gilliam, R. Crumb, Woody Allen, John Cleese, Gloria Steinem and many others.

Doonesbury creator Garry Trudeau in 2012

In the late 1960s, the magazine played an integral role in editor-in-chief Garry Trudeau's creation of his epochal strip Doonesbury.[4] Trudeau published the pre-syndication Doonesbury collection Michael J. (1970) through The Yale Record.[12] In addition to editing the Record, Trudeau (and Record chairman Tim Bannon, basis of Doonesbury attorney T.F. Bannon of Torts, Tarts & Torque) organized Record events such as a successful Annette Funicello film festival, a Tarzan film festival (with guest Johnny Weissmuller) and a Jefferson Airplane concert featuring Sha Na Na.[13]

Recent years[edit]

The 1970s and 1980s are known as the "Dark Ages" amongst Record staffers. Economic conditions in New Haven were abysmal and despite its impressive pedigree, The Record sputtered along, self-destructed and was revived numerous times throughout this period, much like a Ford Pinto (coincidentally, Henry Ford II, CEO of Ford when the Pinto was released, served on The Record's business staff in the late 1930s[14]). Boards were convened and issues were published on an intermittent basis, with issues released in 1971, 1972, 1973, 1976-1981, 1983, and 1987.[15][16]

Then in 1989, Yale students Michael Gerber and Jonathan Schwarz relaunched The Record for good.[17] Their more informal, iconoclastic version of The Record proved popular, and a parody of the short-lived sports newspaper The National garnered national media attention.[18] Gerber also created an ad hoc advisory board from Record alumni and friends, including Mark O'Donnell, Garry Trudeau, Robert Grossman, Harvey Kurtzman, Arnold Roth, Ian Frazier, Sam Johnson and Chris Marcil. While The Record continues to publish paper issues, the magazine began publishing web content in 2001, well before many of its contemporaries. Alums from recent years have gone on to write for many publications and entertainment companies including The New Yorker, McSweeney's, Saturday Night Live, The Late Show with David Letterman, The Onion and The Onion News Network.

The Magazine[edit]

The Record is currently published eight times during the academic year and is distributed in Yale residential college dining halls and around the nation through subscriptions. Content from the magazine is made available online and entire issues can be downloaded in .pdf form.[19]

Themed Issues[edit]

Each issue of the current magazine features a particular theme. Aspects of the magazine include:

  • Snews - One-liners in the form of headlines.
  • Mailbags - Humorous letters to the editor, historical figures, or inanimate objects.
  • The Editorial - Written by the editor in chief of the magazine each issue, giving a brief overview of the contents and making of the issue.
  • Cartoons - Captioned, "New Yorker style" cartoons that hail back to the magazine's early beginnings.
  • Lists and Features - Staff generated content pertinent to the magazine's theme.

Parodies[edit]

From time to time, The Record publishes parodies. These include (but are not limited to):

  • Yale Bulldog Days Program Parody (April 2013)
  • "The Please Your Man Issue" (April 2009), a parody of Cosmopolitan
  • "The Yale Protest Club: Fill Out Your Very Own YPC Petition!" (April 2008)
  • "Parents' Weekend Brochure" (October 2007)
  • Yale Blue Book Parody (September 2007)
  • "Yale Map" (for visiting pre-frosh) (April 2007)
  • Yale Blue Book Parody (September 2006)
  • "Yale's 50 Best Personalities", a Yale Rumpus parody (February 2006)
  • Yale Blue Book Parody (August 2005)
  • "YaleRecordStation" (March 2004), parody of "YaleStation"
  • Yale College Coarse Critique (October 2002), a parody of the Yale Course Critique
  • Yale Handbook Parody (September 2001)
  • Parody of The National Sports Daily (April 1991)
  • Football Program Parody (November 1990)
  • 'The Reader's Dijest' parody of "The Reader's Digest" - [nationally distributed] (1967)
  • Parody of The New York Times Magazine (1966)
  • Sports Illstated (1965), a parody of Sports Illustrated[20]
  • "Fallout Protection" (1962) from the Department of Offense
  • Yew Norker (1961), a parody of The New Yorker[21]
  • Sports Illiterate (1959), a parody of Sports Illustrated[20]
  • Parody of Playboy (1958)
  • Daily Mirror Parody (1957), a parody of the New York Daily Mirror
  • Le Nouveau Yorkeur (1956), a parody of The New Yorker[22]
  • Esquirt (1955), a parody of Esquire
  • The Smut! Issue (1951)
  • Record Comics (1949), featuring "Supergoon", a parody of "Superman", and "Hotshot Stacy", a parody of "Dick Tracy"
  • The Shattering Review of Literature (1949), a parody of The Saturday Review of Literature
  • Happy Hollywood (1947), a movie magazine parody
  • New York's Fiction Newspaper (1946), a parody of the Daily News[23]
  • Parody of The Harvard Crimson (1939)[14]
  • Real Spicy Horror Tales (1937), parody of pulps
  • Parody of Time (1928)

Guest Contributors[edit]

Guest contributors to The Record have included:

Informative Tidbits[edit]

Master's Teas[edit]

Throughout the year, the Record invites notable figures from the world of comedy to "Master's Teas", informal interviews hosted by the Record in conjunction with residential colleges, at which tea is, in fact, not even served upon request. While residential colleges frequently organize Master's Teas, The Yale Record is known for its humorous ones. Guests have included:

"Old Owl"[edit]

"Old Owl"

For over a century, the mascot of the Record has been "Old Owl", a congenial, largely nocturnal, 360-degree-head-turning, cigar-smoking bird who tries to steer the staff towards a light-hearted appreciation of life and the finer things in it. Sometimes he succeeds.

"Old Owl" is a Cutty Sark connoisseur of some repute and enthusiasm. In artists' sketches, he is often portrayed as anthropomorphic, naked and lacking in any identifiable genitals, possibly the result of an old Cutty Sark injury.

As a nod to this lovable old coot and his off-the-wall antics, former chairpeople, editors-in-chief, and publishers are referred to as "old owls".

Documenting the birth of American football[edit]

The Yale Record of the late nineteenth century chronicled much of the birth of American football:

Walter Camp, the "Father of American Football", pictured here in 1878 as the captain of the Yale football team
  • The Yale Record and the Nassau Literary Magazine of Princeton printed the only accounts of the first Yale-Princeton game (1873),[36] the first game played using the Football Association Rules of 1873. These were the first consolidated rules in American football; before this, each of the handful of colleges that had football teams played by its own set of rules.[37]
  • The Yale Record documented the organization and playing of the first Harvard-Yale game (1875). Yale proposed the game. Harvard, which had just rejected an offer to join the association of soccer-playing colleges, accepted the challenge, on condition that the game be played with what were essentially rugby rules. These were the rules used by Harvard, different to the rules of the other colleges. Yale agreed to this condition and was soundly defeated.[38] In reflecting on this crushing defeat, one Record editor blamed the loss on Yale's willingness to adopt the "concessionary rules", complaining that Yale "should not have given so much to Harvard."[39]
  • The Yale Record documented the creation of the Intercollegiate Football Association in 1876. The Harvard-Yale game of 1875 ushered in a national shift from the soccer form to the rugby form of football. Within a year, Princeton had adopted the rugby rules, and in the fall of 1876, Columbia joined Princeton and Harvard to form the Intercollegiate Football Association, which officially adopted English rugby rules. Although Yale agreed to adopt English rugby rules and played Harvard, Princeton and Columbia, they did not join the association as they favored a game with eleven rather than fifteen players, as well as points allowed only for kicked goals.[40]
  • The Yale Record documented the creation of the first American football championship. The Intercollegiate Football Association created the first championship game, which was played between Princeton and Yale on Thanksgiving Day in 1877.[40] The teams tied to share the first national championship.

Coining the term "hot dog"[edit]

They contentedly munched hot dogs during the whole service.

The Yale Record (October 19, 1895)

According to David Wilton, author of Word Myths: Debunking Linguistic Urban Legends (2009), The Yale Record is responsible for coining the term "hot dog":

There are many stories about the origin of the term hot dog, most of them are false. Let us start with what we know. The first known use of the term is in the Yale Record of October 19, 1895...The reason why they are called hot is obvious, but why dog? It is a reference to the alleged contents of the sausage. The association of sausages and dog meat goes back quite a bit further. The term dog has been used as a synonym for sausage since at least 1884...[41]

Bladderball at Yale in 1974. This game has spilled out of Old Campus and into the streets of New Haven.

Bladderball[edit]

Bladderball was a game traditionally played by students at Yale, between 1954 and 1982, after which it was banned by the administration.

It was created by Philip Zeidman as a competition between The Yale Record, the Yale Daily News, The Yale Banner and campus radio station WYBC. It was eventually opened to all students, with teams divided by residential college.[42]

Notable alumni[edit]

Notable Yale Record alumni include (but are not limited to):

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Record Editors". The Yale Banner. New Haven: Thomas Penney and G. D. Pettee. 1877. p. 182.
  2. ^ "Henry Ward Beecher Howard". The twelfth general catalogue of the Psi Upsilon Fraternity. New York: Psi Upsilon. May 1917. p. 112.
  3. ^ "Publications", Yale Daily News, June 10, 2001. http://www.yaledailynews.com/news/university-news/2001/06/10/publications/
  4. ^ a b c d "History", The Yale Record, March 10, 2010. http://www.yalerecord.com/about/history/
  5. ^ Puck. New York: Keppler & Schwarzmann. January 7, 1891.
  6. ^ Judge. New York: Leslie-Judge Company. January 4, 1913.
  7. ^ Fitzgerald, F. Scott (November 1931). "Echoes of the Jazz Age". Scribner's Magazine. New York: Scribner's.
  8. ^ http://spectatorarchive.library.columbia.edu/cgi-bin/columbia?a=d&d=cs19141203-01.2.23#
  9. ^ Lewis, Sinclair (December 1930). "Go East, Young Man". Cosmopolitan. New York: Hearst.
  10. ^ Life (January 6, 1947), pages 6 - 7
  11. ^ http://www.helpmag.com/cover_gallery.htm
  12. ^ Trudeau, Garry (1970). Michael J.. New Haven: Yale Record.
  13. ^ Keating, Christopher (November 28, 2010). "Doonesbury on Chief of Staff Tim Bannon: Garry Trudeau Speaks Out On His Friend From Yale's Humor Magazine". The Hartford Courant'. Hartford: Tribune Company.
  14. ^ a b c d e Alexander, Cecil A. (May–June 2004) "The Pranks of Yesteryear". The Harvard Magazine. Cambridge: Harvard.
  15. ^ Gerber, Michael. "The Yale Record: A short history of its rise, fall, and rise again." 2007. Accessed at http://www.scribd.com/doc/204108707/The-Yale-Record-Its-rise-fall-and-rise-again on February 2, 2014.
  16. ^ Richard, Frank (1980). "The Vance Years: 1977-1980". Cover Illustration. The Yale Record. New Haven: Yale Record. Retrieved at http://images.library.yale.edu/madid/oneItem.aspx?id=3007599&q= on February 7, 2014.
  17. ^ Gerber, 2007.
  18. ^ Associated Press. "Hey! This isn't the National." April 18, 1991. Accessed at http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=2026&dat=19910418&id=OJQrAAAAIBAJ&sjid=vNAFAAAAIBAJ&pg=2013,2037941 on 1 Feb. 2014.
  19. ^ Browse the Magazine
  20. ^ a b http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1090790/index.htm
  21. ^ http://images.library.yale.edu/madid/oneItem.aspx?saveID=1780718&id=1780718
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