Theale Green School

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Theale Green School
Thealegreen.png
Established 1963
Type Academy
Headteacher David Bromfield
Deputy Heads Sophie Cheston
Renuka Watal
Chair of Theale Green Trust Dudley Fishburn
Founder Ken Shield
Location Theale
Berkshire
RG7 5DA
England Coordinates: 51°26′12″N 1°05′11″W / 51.43654°N 1.08625°W / 51.43654; -1.08625
DfE number 869/4000
DfE URN 139938 Tables
Ofsted Reports Pre-academy reports
Students 1,256
Gender Coeducational
Ages 11–18
Houses Benyon, Hunt, Piper and Scott
Website www.thealegreen.org.uk

Theale Green School is a coeducational secondary school and sixth form with academy status, located in the village of Theale, Berkshire, England.

The school has 1,256 pupils on roll,[1] including 210 in the sixth form.

History[edit]

The school was founded as Theale Grammar School in 1963[2] by Ken J V Shield,[3] a graduate of Northampton Grammar School and the University of Cambridge.[2] He had previously taught at Leeds Modern School and Hulme Grammar School, and been deputy head at Thomas Bennett Community College in Crawley.[2]

Upon opening, the school was designed to provide education for 870 pupils.[2] It was extensively expanded throughout the following decade, with the addition of the gymnasium, music department, the sixth form area, and numerous classrooms.[4] A 1971 estimate predicted that the school roll would rise to 1,250 by the middle of the decade.[2] In the early 1970s, the school became a comprehensive and was renamed Theale Green.[3]

In 1985 Chris Gittins was appointed as headteacher. A graduate of Leighton Park School and Cambridge University, he had previously taught at Swanley School, Thomas Bennett School and Longsands Academy in Cambridgeshire. The school pioneered Local Management of Schools prior to the Education Reform Act 1988 with the appointment of the first Bursar in Berkshire, Richard Smith and, in 1987 was renamed Theale Green Community School, becoming the first Community School in the county by strengthening the House System, opening a Sports Centre, and amalgamating the Youth and Adult Education Provision with daytime schooling. The school grew to 1350 students with an expanded sixth form.

In 1992 the school designed and developed the first Learning Support Unit (LSU) in England; The TGCS Student Support Unit became a model for more than 3,500 LSUs that subsequently opened around the country, providing additional support to include and reintegrate pupils whose learning behaviour has deteriorated to a point where exclusion from school is otherwise likely.

In 1993 TGCS won a national competition to achieve funding under the governments Technology Schools Initiative (the precursor to Specialist Schools) and one year later, when the Specialist schools programme began, the school was designated as an Arts college, one of the first four in England, developing an outstanding reputation for technology and arts education recognised in subsequent OFSTED Reports.

In 2002 Chris Gittins became the Government's lead advisor on improving behaviour and attendance in schools and Sue Marshall was appointed Headteacher, moving from the neighbouring Clere School in Hampshire which she had revitalised as Headteacher following a critical OFSTED report in 1996.

In 2010, a planning application was submitted to West Berkshire Council seeking permission to rebuild the sixth form complex.[5] Building work began in late 2010 and the new Sixth Form Centre was opened in November 2011, comprising classrooms, computer facilities, study rooms and a new common room.

In October 2011 the school was given a Notice to Improve by Ofsted. The report stated: "The proportion gaining five or more A* to C grades at GCSE including English and mathematics has now fallen to below the national average and progress for average ability students across the school, particularly in mathematics and science, was inadequate."[6] The follow-up visit, made in October 2012 and published in December 2012, found that the school had not made sufficient improvement on the previous report. As a result of this, the school was placed in special measures, and the head—Sue Marshall—announced her resignation to coincide with the Christmas holiday.[7] She was succeeded by David Bromfield, former principal of Manchester Academy and one-time presenter of Tomorrow's World.[8][9] In September 2013, the school converted to academy status and was renamed, dropping the word "community" from its name, returning to "Theale Green School".

House system[edit]

The school operates a house system. There are four houses, which each have a Head of House, Pastoral Mentor, and a team of tutors. House prefects are appointed by the Head of House.[10] The four houses are:

  •      Benyon
  •      Hunt
  •      Piper
  •      Scott

Benyon house is named after the Benyon family who own the nearby Englefield estate[4] and the land on which the school was built.[11] The house's mascot is a lion.[11]

Hunt house is named after John Hunt, Baron Hunt (1910–1998), the leader of the 1953 British Everest Expedition.[4] The house's mascot is a tiger, which represents strength and determination.[12]

Piper house is named after John Piper (1903–1992) who donated a number of his prints to the school.[13] Piper was introduced to the school by Geoffrey Eastop, whose wife was the head of the art department.[14] The house's mascot is a dragon named Spike.[14]

Scott house is named after either Robert Falcon Scott (1868–1912) or Peter Scott (1909–1989).[4] The house's mascot is a duck.

There are many competitions between these four houses, including rugby, football, netball and hockey tournaments, as well as the annual sports day.

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Ofsted (2012)
  2. ^ a b c d e North (1972, p. 1)
  3. ^ a b Dunford, Bennett & Fawcett (2000, p. 118)
  4. ^ a b c d French (2002a)
  5. ^ West Berkshire Council (2010)
  6. ^ "Theale Green's shock 'inadequate' rating from Ofsted". Reading Chronicle. 11 November 2011. Retrieved 3 December 2011. 
  7. ^ Fort, Linda (5 December 2012). "Theale Green School placed in special measures". Get Reading. Retrieved 10 December 2012. 
  8. ^ "Former TV presenter appointed to lead Theale Green school". Get Reading. 12 December 2012. Retrieved 12 December 2012. 
  9. ^ "The Morning Show: Presenters Profiles". BBC Online. Retrieved 12 December 2012. 
  10. ^ Theale Green Community School (2010, p. 40)
  11. ^ a b Benyon House (2007)
  12. ^ Hunt House (2007)
  13. ^ Spalding (2009, p. 396)
  14. ^ a b Piper House (2007)

Footnotes[edit]

  • Benyon House (2007), About Benyon House, Theale, Berkshire: Theale Green Community School 
  • Dunford, John R; Bennett, David; Fawcett, Richard (2000), School leadership: National and International Perspectives, Abingdon, Oxfordshire: Routledge, ISBN 0-7494-3384-1 
  • French, Peter (2002), General Studies, Theale Green in the 70s 
  • Hunt House (2007), About Hunt House, Theale, Berkshire: Theale Green Community School 
  • North, Leslie (3 February 1972), Education in the Seventies: Theale Green School, Reading, Berkshire: Berkshire Mercury 
  • Ofsted (2010), Theale Green Community School, London: Office for Standards in Education, Children's Services and Skills, retrieved 13 September 2010 
  • Piper House (2007), About Piper House, Theale, Berkshire: Theale Green Community School 
  • Spalding, Frances (2009), John Piper, Myfanwy Piper: Lives in Art, Oxford: Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-956761-1 
  • Theale Green Community School (2010), Staff Handbook 2010/11, Theale, Berkshire 
  • West Berkshire Council (2010), "Application Details (10/01399/FUL)", Planning and Building (Newbury, Berkshire), retrieved 14 September 2010 

External links[edit]