Theodore J. Bauer

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Theodore J. Bauer
Bauer.gif
Born November 18, 1909
Iowa City, Iowa
Died May 6, 2005(2005-05-06) (aged 95)
Wyckoff, New Jersey
Occupation Infectious disease specialist, physician
Employer United States Public Health Service, Becton Dickinson

Theodore J. "Ted" Bauer (November 18, 1909 – May 6, 2005) was an American Infectious disease specialist who was head of the Communicable Disease Center (now known as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) from 1953 to 1956,[1] and who also served as Assistant Surgeon General of the United States.[2]

Biography[edit]

Bauer was born November 18, 1909 in Iowa City, Iowa. Despite his family having lost both its broom factory and farm during the Great Depression, Bauer was able to work his way through school to earn both his B.S. (1934) and M.D. (1933) degrees from the University of Iowa.[1] Upon graduating from the University of Iowa Medical School, Bauer took internships and residencies in Chicago and New York City, furthering his interest in public health epidemiology.[1]

Bauer married Helen in 1939. They had three children.[2]

Bauer's first major act in his career in the United States Public Health Service was the establishment of a Venereal Disease Center in Chicago in 1942.[1] He went on to serve as Chief of the Division of Venereal Disease in Washington, D.C. from 1948 to 1953, and then as Medical Officer in Charge of the Communicable Disease Center (now known as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) in Atlanta from 1953 to 1956.[1] Bauer also served on numerous expert committees for the World Health Organization between 1948 and 1957.[1][2] Finally, Bauer was Chief of the Bureau for State Services in the United States Public Health Service in Washington, D.C. from 1960 to 1962.[1] In 1962, Bauer was awarded the United States Public Health Service Distinguished Service Medal upon his retirement after 29 years of service, having achieved the rank of Assistant Surgeon General of the United States.[1][2]

In 1962, Bauer went to work for Becton Dickinson and Company, where he was Senior Vice President for Research and Medical Affairs until 1975.[1][2] Bauer also served on Becton Dickinson's Board of Directors from 1965 to 1985.[2] Additionally, Bauer served on numerous expert committees for the American Medical Association, the Wyckoff Board of Health, the planning board for Hackensack University Medical Center, and the New Jersey Governor's Health Care Administration Board.[2]

He died at his home in Wyckoff, New Jersey on May 6, 2005.[2]

Publications[edit]

Bauer published more than 50 scientific articles on infectious diseases and chronic disease control, and was editor of the Journals of Venereal Disease Information from 1948 to 1952.[1] He published his memoirs in 2001, entitled Disease Finder From The Midwest.[3]

Selected awards[edit]

Bauer received the United States Public Health Service Distinguished Service Medal in 1962.[1] He received the University of Iowa Distinguished Alumni Award in 1997.[1][2] In 2002, Bauer was inducted into the Immaculate Heart Academy Hall of Fame.[2]

Legacy[edit]

He was survived by three children, nine grandchildren, and seven great grandchildren.[2] Both Bauer and his wife were life members of the University of Iowa Alumni Association and members of the University of Iowa Foundation's Presidents Club.[1] Bauer was a parishioner of the Church of St. Elizabeth of Hungary (Wyckoff, New Jersey) and a member of the High Mountain Golf Club (Franklin Lakes, New Jersey).[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m University of Iowa. "1997 Distinguished Alumni Award Winner Theodore J. Bauer". Retrieved 18 February 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Ancestry.com. "Obit: Dr. Theodore J. Bauer". Retrieved 18 February 2010. 
  3. ^ Bauer, Theodore J. (2001). Disease Finder From The Midwest (The Memoirs of Theodore J. Bauer, M.D.). April F. Smith. ISBN 0-9713788-0-0.