Theo Angelopoulos

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Theo Angelopoulos
Theodoros Angelopoulos Athens 26-4-2009-2.jpg
Angelopoulos presenting his film, The Dust of Time, in 2009 in Athens, Greece
Born Theodoros Angelopoulos
(1935-04-27)27 April 1935
Athens, Greece
Died 24 January 2012(2012-01-24) (aged 76)
Piraeus, Greece
Occupation Film director and screenwriter
Years active 1965–2012
Spouse(s) Phoebe Economopoulou (1980–2012; his death)
Children Anna Angelopoulou, Katerina Angelopoulou and Eleni Angelopoulou
Website
Official website

Theodoros "Theo" Angelopoulos (Greek: Θεόδωρος Αγγελόπουλος) (27 April 1935 – 24 January 2012) was a Greek filmmaker, screenwriter and film producer.

An acclaimed and multi-awarded film director who dominated the Greek art film industry from 1975 on,[1] Angelopoulos is one of the most influential and widely respected filmmakers in the world.[2][3][4] He started making films in 1967. In the 1970s he made a series of political films about modern Greece.

Angelopoulos, defined by Martin Scorsese as "a masterful filmmaker", developed a unique cinematic vision, characterized by slightest movement, slightest change in distance, long takes, and complicated but carefully composed scenes, offering a hypnotic, sweeping, and profoundly emotional cinema.[2][5]

In 1998 his film, Eternity and a Day, went on to win the prestigious Palme d'Or at the 51st edition of the Cannes Film Festival, and his films have been shown at the most important film festivals around the world.[6] In 2000 he was the President of the Jury at the 22nd Moscow International Film Festival.[7] The life of Theo Angelopoulos, his work, and his passion were the subject of a documentary directed in 2008 by Elodie Lelu. [8]

Biography[edit]

Theodoros Angelopoulos was born in Athens on 27 April 1935. During the Greek Civil War, his father was taken hostage and returned when Angelopoulos was 9 years old; according to the director, the absence of his father and looking for him among the dead bodies had a great impact on his cinematography.[9] He studied law at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, but after his military service went to Paris to attend the Sorbonne. He soon dropped out to study film at the Institut des hautes études cinématographiques (IDHEC) before returning to Greece. There, he worked as a journalist and film critic. Angelopoulos began making films after the 1967 coup that began the Greek military dictatorship known as the Regime of the Colonels. He made his first short film in 1968 and in the 1970s he began making a series of political feature films about modern Greece: Days of '36 (Meres Tou 36, 1972), The Travelling Players (O Thiassos, 1975) and The Hunters (I Kynighoi, 1977). In 1978, he was a member of the jury at the 28th Berlin International Film Festival.[10]

Theo Angelopoulos is a masterful filmmaker. He really understands how to control the frame. There are sequences in his work—the wedding scene in The Suspended Step of the Stork; the rape scene in Landscape in the Mist; or any given scene in The Traveling Players—where the slightest movement, the slightest change in distance, sends reverberations through the film and through the viewer. The total effect is hypnotic, sweeping, and profoundly emotional. His sense of control is almost otherworldly.

Martin Scorsese[5]

He quickly established a characteristic style, marked by slow, episodic and ambiguous narrative structures as well as long takes (The Travelling Players, for example, consists of only 80 shots in about four hours of film). These takes often include meticulously choreographed and complicated scenes involving many actors.

The sad state of contemporary Greece is built against Angelopoulos’ poignant poetry of images. In The Travelling Players, Angelopoulos portrays a road narrative through the Grecian provinces, and reveals the fascism, the absence of democracy and national identity, at the face of the military junta.

In Landscape in the Mist the social-realist air merges into surrealism as the director takes his audience once again through misty towns and snowy wilderness. His lifelong tendency to amalgamate Greek myths and history into current political events is revealed once again in his oedipal drama The Weeping Meadow. He stands – along with the few representing the Greek cultural Renaissance in the second half of the 20th century – as a testimony to the elites of his nation who have constantly belittled their culture in lieu of insatiable consumerism which has redefined Greek modernity.[11] His regular collaborators include the cinematographer Giorgos Arvanitis, the screenwriter Tonino Guerra and the composer Eleni Karaindrou. One of the recurring themes of his work is immigration, the flight from homeland and the return, as well as the history of 20th century Greece. Angelopoulos was considered by British film critics Derek Malcolm[12] and David Thomson[13] as one of the world's greatest directors.

While critics have speculated on how he developed his style, Angelopoulos made clear in one interview that "The only specific influences I acknowledge are Orson Welles for his use of plan-sequence and deep focus, and Mizoguchi, for his use of time and off-camera space."[14]

Angelopoulos was awarded honorary doctorates by the Université libre de Bruxelles, Belgium in 1995, by Paris West University Nanterre La Défense, France, by the University of Essex, UK in July 2001,[15] by the University of Western Macedonia, Greece in December 2008,[16] and by the University of the Aegean, Greece in December 2009.[17]

Death[edit]

Angelopoulos died late on Tuesday, 24 January 2012, several hours after being involved in an accident while shooting his latest film, The Other Sea in Athens. The filmmaker had been with his crew in the area of Drapetsona, near Piraeus when he was hit by a motorcycle driven by an off-duty police officer, on Tuesday evening. The accident occurred when Angelopoulos, 76, attempted to cross a busy road. He was taken to the hospital, where he was treated in an intensive care unit but succumbed to his serious injuries several hours later. Before expiring, Angelopoulos suffered at least one heart attack.[18][19]

Awards[edit]

Angelopoulos won numerous awards, including the Palme d'Or at the 51st edition of the Cannes Film Festival in 1998 for Eternity and a Day (Mia aioniotita kai mia mera). His films have been shown at the most important film festivals around the world.[6]

Year Issuer Award Film Result
1968 Thessaloniki Hellenic Association of Film Critics – Best Short Fiction The Broadcast Won[20][a]
1970 Thessaloniki Best Greek Art Film Reconstruction Won[21][b]
1970 Thessaloniki Best Greek New Director Reconstruction Won[21][b]
1970 Thessaloniki Hellenic Association of Film Critics – Best Film Reconstruction Won[21][b]
1971 Berlinale FIPRESCI – Special Mention Reconstruction Won[22]
1971 Georges Sadoul Best Film of the Year Shown in France Reconstruction Won
1971 Hyères Best Foreign Film Reconstruction Won
1972 Thessaloniki Best Greek Director Days of '36 Won[23][c]
1973 Berlinale FIPRESCI – Forum of New Cinema Days of '36 Won[24]
1975 Cannes FIPRESCI (Parallel Sections) The Travelling Players[d] Won[25][26]
1975 Berlinale Interfilm Award – Forum of New Cinema The Travelling Players[d] Won[25][27]
1975 Thessaloniki Best Greek Film The Travelling Players[d] Won[25][28][e]
1975 Thessaloniki Best Greek Director The Travelling Players[d] Won[25][e]
1975 Thessaloniki Best Greek Screenplay The Travelling Players[d] Won[25][e]
1975 BFI Sutherland Trophy The Travelling Players[d] Won[25][29]
1977 Cannes Palme d'Or The Hunters Nominated[30][31]
1978 Chicago Golden Hugo for Best Film The Hunters Won
1980 Kinema Junpo Best Foreign Language Film Director The Travelling Players[d] Won[25][32]
1980 Japanese Academy Best Foreign Language Film The Travelling Players[d] Nominated[25][33]
1980 Venice FIPRESCI Alexander the Great Won[34]
1980 Thessaloniki Best Greek Film Alexander the Great Won[35]
1980 Thessaloniki Hellenic Association of Film Critics – Best Film Alexander the Great Won[35]
1984 Cannes Palme d'Or Voyage to Cythera Nominated[36][37][f]
1984 Cannes Best Screenplay Voyage to Cythera Won[36][37][f]
1984 FIPRESCI International Critic's Prize Voyage to Cythera Won[36][f]
1984 Rio Critics' Award Voyage to Cythera Won
1986 Venice Golden Lion The Beekeeper Nominated[38]
1988 Venice Silver Lion Landscape in the Mist Won[39][g]
1989 Berlinale Interfilm Award – Forum of New Cinema Landscape in the Mist Won[41]
1989 EFA European Film Award for Best Film Landscape in the Mist Won[40][42]
1991 Cannes Palme d'Or The Suspended Step of the Stork Nominated[43]
1991 Chicago Golden Hugo for Best Director Landscape in the Mist Won[h]
1995 Cannes Palme d'Or Ulysses' Gaze Nominated[44][45]
1995 Cannes Grand Jury Prize Ulysses' Gaze Won[43][44]
1995 Cannes International Critics' Prize Ulysses' Gaze Won[43][44]
1995 EFA FIPRESCI – FELIX of the Critics Ulysses' Gaze Won[46][47]
1996 FSCC Prix Léon Moussinac – Best Foreign Film Ulysses' Gaze Won[48]
1996 INSFJ Best Foreign Film Director Ulysses' Gaze Won[49]
1997 Goya Best European Film Ulysses' Gaze Nominated[50]
1997 Mainichi Best Foreign Language Film Ulysses' Gaze Won[51]
1997 Sant Jordi Best Foreign Film Ulysses' Gaze Won[52]
1997 Turia Best Foreign Film Ulysses' Gaze Won[53]
1998 Cannes Palme d'Or Eternity and a Day Won[54][55]
1998 Cannes Prize of the Ecumenical Jury Eternity and a Day Won[54][55]
1998 São Paulo Audience Award – Best Feature Ulysses' Gaze 3[56]
1998 Thessaloniki Best Greek Film The Beekeeper Won[57]
1998 Thessaloniki Best Greek Director The Beekeeper Won[57]
1998 Thessaloniki Best Greek Screenplay The Beekeeper Won[57]
1999 ACCA Silver Condor for Best Foreign Film Ulysses' Gaze Won[58]
2001 ACCA Silver Condor for Best Foreign Film Eternity and a Day Won[58]
2004 Berlinale Golden Bear The Weeping Meadow Nominated[41]
2004 EFA European Film Award for Best Film The Weeping Meadow Nominated[59][60][i]
2004 EFA Audience Award The Weeping Meadow Nominated[59][60][i]
2004 EFA FIPRESCI – European Film Academy Critics The Weeping Meadow Won[59][60][61][i]
2005 Fajr Special Jury Prize – Spiritual Competition The Weeping Meadow Won[62]

Lifetime achievement awards[edit]

Theodoros Angelopoulos was also the recipient of many awards for his long standing career.[6]

Year Provider Award
1995 Université libre de Bruxelles Honorary Doctorate
1996 Italian National Syndicate of Film Journalists European Silver Ribbon[49]
2001 University of Essex Honorary Graduate[15]
2003 Copenhagen International Film Festival Honorary Award[63][j]
2003 Flaiano Film Festival Honorary Award[64]
2004 Montreal World Film Festival Grand Prix Special des Amériques[65]
2004 Busan International Film Festival Hand Printing[66]
2008 University of Western Macedonia Honorary Graduate[16]
2010 Yerevan International Film Festival Lifetime Achievement Award[67]
2009 University of the Aegean Honorary Graduate[17]
Paris West University Nanterre La Défense Honorary Doctorate

Filmography[edit]

Feature films[edit]

Year Title
Original title
Contribution Notes
1970 Reconstitution
(Anaparastasi)
Director
1972 Days of '36
(Meres tou '36)
Director Part 1 of the "Trilogy of History"
1975 The Travelling Players
(O Thiassos)
Director/writer Part 2 of the "Trilogy of History"
1977 The Hunters
(I Kinighi)
Director/co-writer Part 3 of the "Trilogy of History"
1980 Alexander the Great
(O Megalexandros)
Director
1984 Voyage to Cythera
(Taxidi sta Kythira)
Director/co-writer Part 1 of the "Trilogy of Silence"
1986 The Beekeeper
(O Melissokomos)
Director/co-writer Part 2 of the "Trilogy of Silence"
1988 Landscape in the Mist
(Topio stin Omichli)
Director/co-writer European Film Award for Best Film 1989
Part 3 of the "Trilogy of Silence"
1991 The Suspended Step of the Stork
(To Meteoro Vima tou Pelargou)
Director/writer Part 1 of the "Trilogy of Borders"
1995 Ulysses' Gaze
(To Vlemma tou Odyssea)
Director/co-writer Part 2 of the "Trilogy of Borders"
1998 Eternity and a Day
(Mia aioniothta kai mia mera)
Director/co-writer Palme d'Or 1998
Part 3 of the "Trilogy of Borders"
2004 The Weeping Meadow
(Trilogia I: To Livadi pou dakryzi)
Director Part 1 of the trilogy on modern Greece
2009 The Dust of Time
(I skoni tou chronou)
Director Part 2 of the trilogy on modern Greece
[68] The Other Sea
(I alli thalassa)
Director/writer Part 3 of the trilogy on modern Greece

Other films[edit]

Year Title
Original title
Contribution Notes
1968 Broadcast
(I Ekpombi)
Director/writer Short film
1983 Athens
(Athina, epistrofi stin Akropoli)
Director/writer Television film
1995 Lumière and Company
(Lumière et compagnie)
Co-director/co-writer Up to 52 seconds segment of portmanteau film, with contributions from 41 international film directors in which each made a short film using the original Cinématographe camera invented by the Lumière brothers.
2007 To Each His Own Cinema
(Chacun son cinéma)
Co-director/co-writer Trois minutes (Three Minutes) segment of portmanteau film commissioned for the 60th anniversary of the Cannes Film Festival, with contributions from 36 directors.
2011 Invisible World
(Mundo Invisivel)
Co-director/co-writer Short film Sky below The underworld of the center and of the underground of São Paulo and its almost imperceptible inhabitants. The colorful of street art of graffiti in the melancholy of the outside world without redemption, and the weight of divine consciousness.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ At the Thessaloniki International Film Festival of 1968, The Broadcast was also the recipient of a Honorable Mention by the Hellenic Association of Film Critics Award.[20]
  2. ^ a b c At the Thessaloniki International Film Festival of 1970, Reconstruction was also awarded:
  3. ^ At the Thessaloniki International Film Festival of 1972, Giorgos Arvanitis was awarded the Best Greek Cinematography prize for Days of '36.[23]
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h The Travelling Players was also awarded:
    • The Best Film in the World for 1970–1980 by Italian Film Critics Association.
    • One of the Top Films in the History of Cinema by FIPRESCI.
    • The Grand Prix of the Arts, Japan.
    • The Golden Age Award, Brussels.
  5. ^ a b c At the Thessaloniki International Film Festival of 1975, The Travelling Players was also awarded:[28]
  6. ^ a b c At the 37th Cannes Film Festival, the Best Screenplay was awarded to Theodoros Angelopoulos, Tonino Guerra, and Thanassis Valtinos, and, the FIPRESCI International Film Critics Award was awarded ex-aequo with Paris, Texas by Wim Wenders.[36]
  7. ^ At the 46th Venice International Film Festival, Landscape in the Mist and Theodoros Angelopoulos were also awarded:[39] Theodoros Angelopoulos, and the film cast and crew were also nominated for:[40]
  8. ^ At the 27th Chicago International Film Festival, Landscape in the Mist was also awarded the Silver Plaque for Best Cinematography
  9. ^ a b c At the 17th European Film Awards (2004), Theodoros Angelopoulos was also nominated for Best Director.[60]
  10. ^ Theodoros Angelopoulos was the head of the jury of the first edition of the Copenhagen International Film Festival, held between 13–20 August 2003.[63]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Merry 2004, p. 145.
  2. ^ a b Horton 1999, preface.
  3. ^ Malcolm 2000.
  4. ^ Thomson 2000, pp. 21–22.
  5. ^ a b Horton 1999, back cover.
  6. ^ a b c "Theodoros Angelopoulos – Awards". IMDb. 
  7. ^ "22nd Moscow International Film Festival (2000)". MIFF. Retrieved 26 March 2013. 
  8. ^ Presentation of the documentary about Theo Angelopoulos on Eurochannel
  9. ^ "Theodoros Angelopoulos", editions Kastanioti, p. 189.
  10. ^ "Berlinale 1978: Juries". berlinale.de. Retrieved 4 August 2010. 
  11. ^ "Theo Angelopoulos And Greece". Silhouette Magazine & Learning and Creativity. 2012-04-01. Retrieved 2014-06-22. 
  12. ^ Malcolm 2000.
  13. ^ Thomson 2002, pp. 21–22.
  14. ^ The Last Modernist, ed. Andrew Horton, 1997
  15. ^ a b "Honorary Graduates :: Theodoros Angelopoulos". University of Essex. 9 December 2009. 
  16. ^ a b "Honorary Graduates :: Theodoros Angelopoulos". University of Western Macedonia. 15 December 2008. 
  17. ^ a b "Honorary Graduates :: Theodoros Angelopoulos". University of the Aegean. 12 July 2001. 
  18. ^ "Director Angelopoulos dies after accident while filming". Kathimerini. 25 January 2012. 
  19. ^ Associated Press (24 January 2012). "Culture – Film – Filmmaker Theo Angelopoulos dies in accident". guardian.co.uk. 
  20. ^ a b "Thessaloniki Film Festival (1968)". IMDb. 
  21. ^ a b c d "Thessaloniki Film Festival (1970)". IMDb. 
  22. ^ "Berlin International Film Festival (1971)". IMDb. 
  23. ^ a b "Thessaloniki Film Festival (1972)". IMDb. 
  24. ^ "Berlin International Film Festival (1973)". IMDb. 
  25. ^ a b c d e f g h "The Travelling Players (1975) – Awards". IMDb. 
  26. ^ "Cannes Film Festival (1975)". IMDb. 
  27. ^ "Berlin International Film Festival (1975)". IMDb. 
  28. ^ a b "Thessaloniki Film Festival (1975)". IMDb. 
  29. ^ "British Film Institute Awards (1975)". IMDb. 
  30. ^ "I KINIGUI" [The Hunters]. Cannes Film Festival. 
  31. ^ "Cannes Film Festival (1977)". IMDb. 
  32. ^ "Kinema Junpo Awards (1980)". IMDb. 
  33. ^ "Awards of the Japanese Academy (1980)". IMDb. 
  34. ^ "Venice Film Festival (1980)". IMDb. 
  35. ^ a b "Thessaloniki Film Festival (1980)". IMDb. 
  36. ^ a b c d "Awards 1984". Cannes Film Festival. 
  37. ^ a b "Cannes Film Festival (1984)". IMDb. 
  38. ^ "Venice Film Festival (1986)". IMDb. 
  39. ^ a b "Venice Film Festival (1988)". IMDb. 
  40. ^ a b "European Film Awards – 1989: The Winners". European Film Academy. 4 September 2008. 
  41. ^ a b "Berlin International Film Festival (1989)". IMDb. 
  42. ^ "European Film Awards (1989)". IMDb. 
  43. ^ a b c "Cannes Film Festival (1991)". IMDb. 
  44. ^ a b c "Festival de Cannes: Ulysses' Gaze". Cannes Film Festival. Retrieved 5 September 2009. 
  45. ^ "Cannes Film Festival (1995)". IMDb. 
  46. ^ "European Film Awards – 1995: The Winners". European Film Academy. 4 September 2008. 
  47. ^ "European Film Awards (1995)". IMDb. 
  48. ^ "French Syndicate of Cinema Critics (1996)". IMDb. 
  49. ^ a b "Italian National Syndicate of Film Journalists (1996)". IMDb. 
  50. ^ "Goya Awards (1997)". IMDb. 
  51. ^ "Mainichi Film Concours (1997)". IMDb. 
  52. ^ "Sant Jordi Awards (1997)". IMDb. 
  53. ^ "Turia Awards (1997)". IMDb. 
  54. ^ a b "Festival de Cannes: Eternity and a Day". Cannes Film Festival. Retrieved 1 October 2009. 
  55. ^ a b "Cannes Film Festival (1998)". IMDb. 
  56. ^ "São Paulo International Film Festival (1998)". IMDb. 
  57. ^ a b c "Thessaloniki Film Festival (1998)". IMDb. 
  58. ^ a b "Argentinean Film Critics Association Awards (1999)". IMDb. 
  59. ^ a b c "European Film Awards – 2004: The Winners". European Film Academy. 4 September 2008. 
  60. ^ a b c d "European Film Awards (2004)". IMDb. 
  61. ^ "special awards 2004". fIPRESCI. 
  62. ^ "Fajr Film Festival (2005)". IMDb. 
  63. ^ a b "Copenhagen International Film Festival (2003)". IMDb. 
  64. ^ "Flaiano International Prizes (2003)". IMDb. 
  65. ^ "Montréal World Film Festival (2004)". IMDb. 
  66. ^ "Pusan International Film Festival (2004)". IMDb. 
  67. ^ "Yerevan International Film Festival (2010)". IMDb. 
  68. ^ Left uncompleted by Angelopoulos' unexpected death in January 2012.

Bibliography and sources[edit]

Books
Journals, magazines, and web

External links[edit]