Theomatics

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Theomatics is a numerological study of the Hebrew/Aramaic and Greek text of the Christian Bible, based upon gematria and isopsephia, which its proponents show the direct intervention of God in the writing of Christian scripture.

Etymology[edit]

The term "theomatics" was coined by Del Washburn in 1976 as a combination of "Θεός" ("God") and "mathematics". Washburn wrote three books about theomatics[1] and created a website[2] espousing the hypothesis.

Methodology[edit]

Theomatics is not the same thing as Bible code; it uses an entirely different technique. The Bible code (also called ELS for Equidistant Letter Sequences) uses a letter skipping technique. Theomatics, on the other hand, is based on gematria and isopsephia, systems which assign numerical values to letters in the ancient Hebrew/Aramaic and Greek alphabets.

Controversy[edit]

An analysis and criticism of theomatics has been published by Tim Hayes, previously under the pseudonym "A. B. Leever". [3][4]

A German statistician, Kurt Fettelschoss, published an analysis[5] that found that "The observed quantity of theomatic hits is significantly not random".[6] A response to the findings were posted by Tim Hayes.[7]

An analysis by Russell Glasser, entitled "Theomatics Debunked",[8] shows the same phenomenon in a secular text.

Washburn's website has a page entitled "Scientific Proof"[9] which discusses and responds to potential arguments against theomatics.

References[edit]

  1. ^ The three books are:
  2. ^ Del Washburn. "What is Theomatics?". Retrieved 2006-12-09. 
  3. ^ Hayes, Tim. "ABLEEVER". Retrieved 8 January 2014. "I am Tim Hayes, "a believer" in Jesus Christ, whom I know and love." 
  4. ^ Hayes, Tim. "Theomatics". Retrieved October 10, 2005. 
  5. ^ Kurt Fettelschoss. "Table of Contents". Theomatics. Retrieved 2006-12-09. 
  6. ^ Kurt Fettelschoss. "Cover letter". Retrieved 2006-12-09. 
  7. ^ Hayes, Tim. "Response to Fettelschoss". Retrieved 2006-12-09. 
  8. ^ Russell Glasser. "Theomatics Debunked". Retrieved October 10, 2005. 
  9. ^ Del Washburn. "Scientific Proof of the Discovery". Retrieved 2005-10-10. 

Further reading[edit]