Theriaca (poem)

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This article is about the poem by Nicander. For other uses, see Theriaca (disambiguation).
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The Theriaca (Ancient Greek: Θηριακά) is the longest surviving work of the 2nd-century BC Greek poet Nicander of Colophon.

It is a 958-line hexameter poem describing the nature of venomous creatures, including snakes, spiders, and scorpions, and the wounds that they inflict.[1]

Nicander also wrote the companion work Alexipharmaca, which explored other poisons and venoms.

Etymology[edit]

The title is the Latinized form of the Greek neuter plural adjective θηριακά (thēriaka), "having to do with venomous animals",[2] which in turn derives from Ancient Greek: θηρίον (thērion), "wild animal".[3] A corresponding English noun theriac also exists.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Nicander of Colophon". University of Chicago. 
  2. ^ θηριακός. Liddell, Henry George; Scott, Robert; A Greek–English Lexicon at the Perseus Project.
  3. ^ θηρίον in Liddell and Scott.
  4. ^ "theriaca". dictionary.com. 

Further reading[edit]