These Foolish Things (album)

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These Foolish Things
Studio album by Bryan Ferry
Released 5 October 1973 (1973-10-05)
Recorded June 1973 (1973-06)
Genre Rock
Glam rock
Length 43:46
Label Virgin
Producer Bryan Ferry, John Porter, John Punter
Bryan Ferry chronology
These Foolish Things
(1973)
Another Time, Another Place
(1974)
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic 4/5 stars link
Robert Christgau A- link

These Foolish Things is the debut solo studio album by Bryan Ferry, whom at the time was still Roxy Music's lead vocalist. The album was released in October 1973 on Virgin Records, it was an commercial and critical success, peaking at number 5 on the albums chart in the United Kingdom. The album is considered to be a departure from Roxy Music's sound, because it consists entirely of cover versions, mainly of standard songs. The album achieved Gold status by the BPI in the United Kingdom in May 1974[1]

Most of the tracks on the album, were personal favorites of Ferry's which spanned several decades from 1930's standards such as the title track through 1950's Elvis Presley to Bob Dylan and the Rolling Stones.[2]

Ferry's cover of The Rolling Stones' classic "Sympathy for the Devil", is considered to be ironic by fans, because Ferry's then-girlfriend Jerry Hall, left him for Mick Jagger in 1977.

Rhapsody praised the album, calling it one of their favorite cover albums.[3]

Composition[edit]

When Ferry was asked about the album, he said "It's a very catholic selection, I've given up trying to please all of the people all of the time. Some will like it for one reason, some for another. And some will presumably dislike it for the wrong reasons though I hope the general point of it will be understood. Its amusement value. I think,".[4]

Critical reception[edit]

Reviewing for AllMusic, critic Ned Raggett wrote of the album "Throughout Ferry's instantly recognizable croon carries everything to a tee, and the overall mood is playful and celebratory. Wrapping up with a grand take on "These Foolish Things" itself, this album is one of the best of its kind by any artist."[5] And the critic, Robert Christgau wrote of the album "Ferry both undercuts the inflated idealism of the original and reaffirms its essential power. Along the way, he also establishes "It's My Party" as a protest song. And just in case we're getting any highfalutin ideas, the title track reminds us that pop is only, well, foolish things, many of which predate not only Andy Warhol but rock and roll itself."[6]

Track listing[edit]

No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. "A Hard Rain's a-Gonna Fall" (Bob Dylan cover from the album The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan (1962)) Bob Dylan 5:19
2. "River of Salt" (cover) Irving Brown, Bernard Zackery, Jan Zackery 1:48
3. "Don't Ever Change" (cover) Gerry Goffin, Carole King 2:15
4. "Piece of My Heart" (Erma Franklin cover from the 1967 single) Jerry Ragovoy, Bert Berns 3:06
5. "Baby I Don't Care" (cover) Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller 1:50
6. "It's My Party" (Lesley Gore cover from the album I'll Cry If I Want to (1963)) Walter Gold, John Gluck Jr., Herb Weiner 2:00
7. "Don't Worry Baby" (The Beach Boys cover from the album Shut Down Volume 2 (1964)) Brian Wilson, Roger Christian 4:13
8. "Sympathy for the Devil" (The Rolling Stones cover from the album Beggars Banquet (1968)) Mick Jagger, Keith Richards 5:50
9. "The Tracks of My Tears" (The Miracles cover from the album Going to a Go-Go (1965)) William "Smokey" Robinson, Jr., Warren Moore, Marvin Tarplin 3:04
10. "You Won't See Me" (The Beatles cover from the album Rubber Soul (1965)) John Lennon, Paul McCartney 2:32
11. "I Love How You Love Me" (The Paris Sisters cover from the 1961 single) Barry Mann, Larry Kolber 3:02
12. "Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever" (Four Tops cover from the album On Top (1966)) Ivy Jo Hunter, Stevie Wonder 3:06
13. "These Foolish Things" (cover) Jack Strachey (music), Eric Maschwitz (lyrics) 5:41

Personnel[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]