Thesis statement

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A thesis statement usually appears near the end of the introductory paragraph of a paper, and it offers a concise summary of the main point or claim of the essay, research paper, etc. A thesis statement is usually one sentence that appears at the end of the first paragraph, though it may occur as more than one.[1] The thesis statement is developed, supported, and explained in the course of the paper by means of examples and evidence.

Types of thesis statements[edit]

The thesis statement will reflect the kind of paper you are writing. There are three kinds of papers: analytical, expository, and argumentative. The thesis will take a different form for each of these kinds of papers. [2]

Further reading[edit]

  • Jonathan Culler and Kevin Lamb. Just being difficult? : academic writing in the public arena Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 2003. ISBN 0-8047-4709-1
  • William Germano. Getting It Published, 2nd Edition: A Guide for Scholars and Anyone Else Serious About Serious Books. ISBN 978-0-226-28853-6. Read a chapter.
  • Wellington, J. J. Getting published : a guide for lecturers and researcherLondon ; New York : RoutledgeFalmer, 2003. ISBN 0-415-29847-4
  • John A. Goldsmith et al. "Teaching and Research" in The Chicago Guide to Your Academic Career. ISBN 0-226-30151-6.
  • Cary Nelson and Stephen Watt. "Scholarly Books" and "Peer Review" in Academic Keywords: A Devil's Dictionary for Higher Education. ISBN 0-415-92203-8.
  • Martin Horton-Eddison. "First Class Essays" Hull, United Kingdom : Purple Peacock Press, 2012
  • Carol Tenopir and Donald King. "Towards Electronic Journals: Realities for Librarians and Publishers. SLA, 2000. ISBN 0-87111-507-7.
  • Björk, B-C. (2007) "A model of scientific communication as a global distributed information system" Information Research, 12(2) paper 307.
  • Furman, R. (2007). Practical tips for publishing scholarly articles: Writing and publishing in the helping professions. Chicago: Lyceum Books.
  • Cargill, M. and O'Connor, P. (2013) Writing Research Articles. West Sussex, UK. John Wiley & Sons Inc. 2nd ed. ISBN 978-1-4443-5621-2

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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