They Just Had to Get Married

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They Just Had to Get Married
Directed by Edward Ludwig
Produced by Carl Laemmle Jr.
Written by Cyril Harcourt (play)
Gladys Lehman
H.M. Walker
Preston Sturges (uncredited)
Clarence J. Marks
(add'l dialogue)
Starring Slim Summerville
Zasu Pitts
Roland Young
Verree Teasdale
Music by James Dietrich
Cinematography Edward Snyder
Edited by Ted J. Kent
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release dates December 22, 1932 (San Diego)
January 5, 1933 (U.S.)
Running time 69 minutes
Country United States
Language English

They Just Had to Get Married (1933) is a comedy film directed by Edward Ludwig and starring Slim Summerville, Zasu Pitts, Roland Young, and Verree Teasdale.

The screenplay was written by Gladys Lehman, H.M. Walker, and an uncredited Preston Sturges, based on the Broadway play A Pair of Silk Stockings (1914) by Cyril Harcourt.[1][2] This was the play's third film adaptation.[3]

Plot[edit]

When wealthy Henry Davidson dies, he leaves all his money to his faithful butler, Sam Sutton (Summerville), and maid, Molly Hull (Pitts), who are finally able to get married. Their new lives as millionaires gets them involved with flirtatious Lola Montrose (Teasdale) and Davidson's relative Hillary Hume (Young), and complications ensue.

Sam and Molly lose everything, break up, and are finally tricked into reconciling.[4][5]

Cast[edit]

Cast notes:

Production[edit]

The original title of this film was They Had to Get Married. However, the Hays Office disapproved of this title, and requested the addition of the world "just".[3]

They Just Had to Get Married was the third film version of Cyril Harcourt's 1914 play A Pair of Silk Stockings. The first two were both silent films: a 1918 Lewis J. Selznick presentation also called A Pair of Silk Stockings,[6] and a 1927 Universal film called Silk Stockings.[7] These films are not related to the 1957 film Silk Stockings, which was a musical remake of Ninotchka (1939).[3]

The film premiered in San Diego, California on 22 December 1932, and went into general American release on 5 January 1933.[8]

Notes[edit]

External links[edit]