Thiazyl trifluoride

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Thiazyl trifluoride
Thiazyl-trifluoride-2D-dimensions.png Thiazyl-trifluoride-3D-vdW.png
Identifiers
CAS number 15930-75-3 N
PubChem 140008
ChemSpider 123471 YesY
ChEBI CHEBI:30507 YesY
Jmol-3D images Image 1
Properties
Molecular formula NSF3
Molar mass 103.07 g mol−1
Melting point −72.6 °C (−98.7 °F; 200.6 K)
Boiling point −27.1 °C (−16.8 °F; 246.1 K)
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
 N (verify) (what is: YesY/N?)
Infobox references

Thiazyl trifluoride is a chemical compound of nitrogen, sulfur, and fluorine, having the formula NSF3. It exists as a stable, colourless gas, and is an important precursor to other sulfur-nitrogen-fluorine compounds.[1] It has tetrahedral molecular geometry around the sulfur atom, and is regarded to be a prime example of a compound that has a sulfur-nitrogen triple bond.[2]

Preparation[edit]

NSF3 can be synthesised by the fluorination of thiazyl fluoride, NSF, with silver(II) fluoride, AgF2:

NSF + 2 AgF2 → NSF3 + 2 AgF

or by the oxidative decomposition of FC(O)NSF2 by silver(II) fluoride.:[3]

FC(O)NSF2 + 2 AgF2 → NSF3 + 2 AgF + COF2

It is also a product of the oxidation of ammonia by S
2
F
10
.[4]

Reactions[edit]

NSF3 reacts with carbonyl fluoride (COF2) in the presence of hydrogen fluoride to form pentafluorosulfanyl isocyanate (SF5NCO).[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Oskar Glemser and Rüdiger Mews (1980). "Chemistry of Thiazyl Fluoride (NSF) and Thiazyl Trifluoride (NSF3): A Quarter Century of Sulfur-Nitrogen-Fluorine Chemistry". Angew. Chem Int. Ed Engl. 19 (11): 883–899. doi:10.1002/anie.198008831. 
  2. ^ Borrmann, T.; Lork, E.; Mews, R. D.; Parsons, S.; Petersen, J.; Stohrer, W. D.; Watson, P. G. (2008). "The crystal structures of NSF
    3
    and (NSF
    2
    N(CH
    3
    )CH–)
    2
    : How short is the 'Crystallographic' N≡S triple bond?". Inorganica Chimica Acta 361 (2): 479–486. doi:10.1016/j.ica.2007.05.016.
      edit
  3. ^ Chivers, Tristram; Laitinen, Risto S. (2006). "Chalcogen–Nitrogen Chemistry". In Devillanova, Francesco. Handbook of Chalcogen Chemistry. London: The Royal Society of Chemistry. p. 238. doi:10.1039/9781847557575. ISBN 978-0-85404-366-8. 
  4. ^ Steve Mitchell (1996). Steve Mitchell, ed. Biological interactions of sulfur compounds. CRC Press. p. 14. ISBN 0-7484-0245-4. 
  5. ^ US patent 3,666,784, Alan F. Clifford, Thomas C. Rhyne and James W. Thompson, "Process For Preparing .alpha.,.alpha.-Fluorinated Alkyl Isocyanates", issued 1972-05-30