This Is What I Do (Sonny Rollins album)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
This Is What I Do
Studio album by Sonny Rollins
Released 2000
Recorded May 8, 9 & July 29, 2000
Genre Jazz, hard bop, straight-ahead jazz, mainstream
Length 48:19
Label Milestone
Producer Sonny and Lucille Rollins
Sonny Rollins chronology
Global Warming
(1998)
This Is What I Do
(2000)
Without a Song: The 9/11 Concert
(2002)
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4/5 stars[1]

This Is What I Do is an album by jazz saxophonist Sonny Rollins, released on the Milestone label in 2000, featuring performances by Rollins with Clifton Anderson, Stephen Scott, Bob Cranshaw, Jack DeJohnette and Perry Wilson.[2]

Reception[edit]

The Allmusic review by Alex Henderson states "This Is What I Do falls short of essential, but it offers some nice surprises and is a rewarding addition to Rollins' huge catalog".[3] The Penguin Guide to Jazz gave it a maximum four-star rating and classified it as part of its core collection, stating "This Is What I Do is unmistakable, and great Sonny Rollins".[4] The album won a 2001 Grammy Award for Best Jazz Instrumental Album.[5]

Track listing[edit]

All compositions by Sonny Rollins except as indicated
  1. "Salvador" – 7:55
  2. "Sweet Leilani" (Harry Owens) – 7:01
  3. "Did You See Harold Vick?" – 9:19
  4. "A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square" (Eric Maschwitz, Manning Sherwin) – 8:06
  5. "Charles M." – 10:19
  6. "Moon of Manakoora" (Frank Loesser, Alfred Newman) – 5:44
Recorded at Clinton Recording Studios, New York City on May 8 & 9, 2000, except tracks 3 & 5, recorded on July 29.

Personnel[edit]

Musicians[edit]

Production[edit]

  • Troy Halderson – recording engineering
  • Mark Fraunfelder – recording assistance
  • Jeremy Welsh – recording assistance
  • Richard Corsello – remixing engineering
  • George Horn – mastering
  • Jamie Putnam – art direction, design
  • John Abbott – photography (including cover)
  • Steve Maruta – photography

References[edit]

  1. ^ Allmusic Review
  2. ^ Sonny Rollins discography accessed 21 September 2009
  3. ^ Henderson, Alex Allmusic Review accessed 21 September 2009.
  4. ^ Cook, Richard & Morton, Brian (2008) The Penguin Guide to Jazz Recordings, p. 1235–36. Penguin.
  5. ^ Grammy Past Winners accessed April 2, 2013