Thomas Aquinas Flannery

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Thomas Aquinas Flannery (May 10, 1918 – September 20, 2007) was a United States federal judge.

Born in Washington, D.C., Flannery received an LL.B. from Catholic University of America School of Law in 1940. He was in private practice in Washington, D.C. from 1940 to 1942, and was then in the United States Army Air Corps during World War II, from 1942 to 1945, returning to private practice in Washington, D.C. from 1945 to 1948. He was a trial attorney of U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C. from 1948 to 1950, and an Assistant U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia from 1950 to 1962. He again returned to private practice in Washington, D.C. from 1962 to 1969, and was the United States Attorney for the District of Columbia from 1969 to 1971.

On November 18, 1971, Flannery was nominated by President Richard Nixon to a seat on the United States District Court for the District of Columbia, vacated by Leonard P. Walsh. Flannery was confirmed by the United States Senate on December 1, 1971, and received his commission on December 6, 1971. He assumed senior status on May 10, 1985, serving in that capacity until his death, in Washington, D.C.

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