Thomas Cholmondeley, 4th Baron Delamere

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Captain Tom Cholmondeley served in the Welsh Guards during the Second World War.

The Rt. Hon. Thomas Pitt Hamilton Cholmondeley, 4th Baron Delamere (/ˈʌmli/; 19 August 1900– 13 April 1979), styled The Honourable Thomas Cholmondeley from birth until 1931, was a British peer.[1] Popularly known (from 1931) as Tom Delamere, he owned the vast Soysambu Ranch in Kenya.

Personal life[edit]

Cholmondeley was the eldest son of The 3rd Baron Delamere, whom he succeeded in 1931.[2] His mother was Lady Florence Anne Cole, an Anglo-Irish aristocrat who was the daughter of The 4th Earl of Enniskillen.[1] Cholmondeley was an indirect descendant of Sir Robert Walpole, the first Prime Minister of Great Britain.[3]

In 1924, Cholmondeley married Phyllis Anne Montagu Douglas Scott (1904-1978), daughter of Lord George William Montagu Douglas Scott (1866–1947; younger son of The 6th Duke of Buccleuch) and Lady Elizabeth Emily Manners (1878–1924; daughter of The 7th Duke of Rutland).[1] The children of that marriage were:

  • The Hon. Elizabeth Florence Marion (b. 26 December 1925 -d. 1988).[1]
  • The Hon. Anne Jeannetta Essex (b. 2 September 1927 - d. 18 October 2013). [4]
  • Hugh George (b. 18 January 1934).[1]

Cholmondely had become Baron Delamere (in 1931) by the time he and Baroness Delamere were divorced in 1944.[1] In June of that year, Lord Delamere re-married, this time to The Hon. Ruth Mary Clarisse Ashley (1906-1986), daughter of the then late Lt. Col. Lord Mount Temple (a former Tory Cabinet minister), who was the first (and only) Baron Mount Temple (of the second creation), and Amalia Mary Maud Cassel. This second marriage ended in divorce in 1955.[1] On 26 March 1955, Lord Delamere married, thirdly, Diana Caldwell (1913-1987), daughter of Seymore Caldwell, better known as Diana Delves-Broughton.[5]

Vale Royal Great House, formerly the seat of the Barons of Delamere -- sold in 1947

Lands and estates[edit]

In this period, the Cholmondeley family continued to own ancestral land and estates in Cheshire in the North of England. However, Lord Delamere lived, worked and invested most of his life in building modern Kenya. In 1934, Tom Delamere moved his family into Vale Royal Abbey, only to be forced out in 1939 when His Majesty's Government converted Vale Royal to serve as a sanatorium for soldiers of World War II. The Cholmondeleys were restored to possession of the abbey after the war, but by 1947 the house and grounds had been sold.[6]

Baron Delamere died at age 79 in August 1979; and he was succeeded in the lands, estates and title by his son from his first marriage, Hugh Cholmondeley, 5th Baron Delamere.[1]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Lundy, Darryl. "4th Baron Delamere, ID #13979". The Peerage. [unreliable source][unreliable source]
  2. ^ Lundy, Darryl. "3rd Baron Delamere, ID #72546". The Peerage. [unreliable source][unreliable source]
  3. ^ Hayden, Joseph. (1851). The book of dignities, pp. 527, 565.
  4. ^ "The Hon Anne Jeannetta Essex Garnett 1927-2013". Peerage News. 
  5. ^ "Lady Delamere, Figure in Murder," New York Times. September 5, 1987.
  6. ^ Holland, G.D et al. (1977). Vale Royal Abbey and House, p. 32; Westair-Reproductions: Cheshire, Museum finder

References[edit]

Peerage of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Hugh Cholmondeley
Baron Delamere
1931–1979
Succeeded by
Hugh Cholmondeley