Thomas Dixon (architect)

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Thomas Dixon (died July 25, 1886[1]) was a Presbyterian architect born in Wilmington, Delaware and one of the founders of the Baltimore chapter of AIA.[2] He was the father of minister Thomas Freeman Dixon, an 1893 graduate of Princeton Theological Seminary. He partnered with his brother, James M. Dixon, from 1851 until James's death in 1863.[3] In 1871, he partnered with another well-known Baltimore architect Charles L. Carson for some time doing business from their offices at 117 Baltimore Street as "Thomas Dixon and Charles L. Carson"[4] until sometime before 1877 when the partnership was dissolved.[5] In 1827, he was elected into the National Academy of Design as an Honorary Academician.

He was married to Rebecca Howard, with whom he had one son: Rev. L. Freeman Dixon.[6] He lived at 253 North Eutaw Street in Baltimore at the time of his death.[7]

Selected works[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Late Thomas Dixon, The Sun (1837-1985); Jul 27, 1886; ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Baltimore Sun (1837-1985) pg. 4
  2. ^ American Institute of Architects and Engineers, The Sun (1837-1985); Nov 15, 1875; ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Baltimore Sun (1837-1985)
  3. ^ Wollon, James T. (March 11, 2010). "Thomas Dixon". Baltimore Architecture Foundation. 
  4. ^ Changes In Business Firms, The Sun (1837-1985); Jan 3, 1871; ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Baltimore Sun (1837-1985) pg. 4
  5. ^ The Obituary Record: Charles L. Carson The Well Known Architect, The Sun (1837-1985); Dec 19, 1891; ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Baltimore Sun (1837-1985) pg. 8
  6. ^ Death Of Mrs. R.H. Dixon, The Sun (1837-1985); Apr 28, 1898; ProQuest Historical Newspapers "The Baltimore Sun" (1837-1985) pg. 8
  7. ^ Died, The Sun (1837-1985); Jul 27, 1886; ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Baltimore Sun (1837-1985) pg. 2
  8. ^ a b "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2008-04-15. 
  9. ^ The Architecture of Baltimore an Illustrated History, Hayward & Shivers, 2004 ISBN 0-8018-7806-3, p. 142
  10. ^ Baltimore County Panorama, Brooks & Parsons, ISBN 0-937076-03-1, p. 29