Thomas Enqvist

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Thomas Enqvist
Thomas Enqvist ATC2010.jpg
Country  Sweden
Residence Monte Carlo, Monaco
Born (1974-03-13) 13 March 1974 (age 40)
Stockholm, Sweden
Height 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in)
Turned pro 1991
Retired 2006
Plays Right-handed (two-handed backhand)
Prize money $10,461,641
Singles
Career record 448–297
Career titles 19
Highest ranking No. 4 (15 November 1999)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open F (1999)
French Open 4R (2001)
Wimbledon QF (2001)
US Open 4R (1993, 1996, 2000)
Other tournaments
Tour Finals SF (1995)
Olympic Games 3R (1996)
Doubles
Career record 35–46
Career titles 1
Highest ranking No. 169 (8 May 2000)

Thomas Karl Johan Enqvist (born 13 March 1974 in Stockholm) is a former professional tennis player from Sweden.

He was quickly touted as the only Swede who could follow in the footsteps of Björn Borg, Mats Wilander and Stefan Edberg, and was ranked as high as World No. 4 (which he attained in 1999) in the ATP Rankings, reaching the final of the Australian Open the same year.

Tennis career[edit]

Throughout his career, Enqvist finished a year ranked in the top 10 four times and won at least one ATP title for six consecutive years. In 1998 he underwent surgery in Stockholm to remove a small piece of bone from his right foot and had surgery on his right shoulder to repair a repetitive strain injury. Despite his surgeries, Enqvist posted some impressive victories, including wins over Pete Sampras, Juan Carlos Ferrero, and Andy Roddick.

Enqvist won a total of 19 singles titles, the biggest being ATP Masters Series titles at Paris (1996), Stuttgart (1999) and Cincinnati (2000). He also won one doubles title.

His best showing at a Grand Slam event was in 1999, when he lost the Australian Open final to Yevgeny Kafelnikov of Russia. He also reached the quarter-finals of Wimbledon in 2001 and at the 1996 Australian Open.

Enqvist was a force on the Swedish Davis Cup team. In 1998, he helped Sweden reach the finals of the Davis Cup for the fourth time in five years.

He currently works as captain for the Swedish Davis Cup team and as an expert commentator for Eurosport Sweden.

Major finals[edit]

Grand Slam finals[edit]

Singles: 1 (0–1)[edit]

Outcome Year Tournament Opponent in the final Score in the final
Runner-up 1999 Australian Open Russia Yevgeny Kafelnikov 6–4, 0–6, 3–6, 6–7(1–7)

Masters Series finals[edit]

Singles: 3 (3–1)[edit]

Outcome Year Tournament Opponent in the final Score in the final
Winner 1996 Paris Russia Yevgeny Kafelnikov 6–2, 6–4, 7–5
Winner 1999 Stuttgart Netherlands Richard Krajicek 6–1, 6–4, 5–7, 7–5
Runner-up 2000 Indian Wells Spain Àlex Corretja 4–6, 4–6, 3–6
Winner 2000 Cincinnati United Kingdom Tim Henman 7–6(7–5), 6–4

Career singles finals (26)[edit]

Wins (19–7)[edit]

Legend
Grand Slam (0–1)
Tennis Masters Cup (0–0)
ATP Masters Series (3–1)
ATP Championship Series (2–1)
ATP Tour (14–4)
Titles by Surface
Hard (13–7)
Grass (0–0)
Clay (2–0)
Carpet (4–0)
Outcome No. Date Championship Surface Opponent in the final Score in the final
Winner 1. 19 October 1992 Bolzano, Italy Carpet (i) France Arnaud Boetsch 6–1, 1–6, 7–6(9–7)
Winner 2. 30 August 1993 Schenectady, U.S. Hard New Zealand Brett Steven 4–6, 6–3, 7–6(7–0)
Winner 3. 16 January 1995 Auckland, New Zealand Hard United States Chuck Adams 6–2, 6–1
Winner 4. 27 February 1995 Philadelphia, U.S. Carpet (i) United States Michael Chang 0–6, 6–4, 6–0
Winner 5. 15 May 1995 Pinehurst, U.S. Clay Argentina Javier Frana 6–3, 3–6, 6–3
Runner-up 1. 7 August 1995 Los Angeles, U.S. Hard Germany Michael Stich 7–6(9–7), 6–7(4–7), 2–6
Winner 6. 21 August 1995 Indianapolis, U.S. Hard Germany Bernd Karbacher 6–4, 6–3
Winner 7. 13 November 1995 Stockholm, Sweden Hard (i) France Arnaud Boetsch 7–5, 6–4
Winner 8. 15 April 1996 New Delhi, India Hard Zimbabwe Byron Black 6–2, 7–6(7–3)
Winner 9. 4 November 1996 Paris, France Carpet (i) Russia Yevgeny Kafelnikov 6–2, 6–4, 7–5
Winner 10. 11 November 1996 Stockholm, Sweden Hard (i) United States Todd Martin 7–5, 6–4, 7–6(7–0)
Winner 11. 17 February 1997 Marseille, France Hard (i) Chile Marcelo Ríos 6–4, 1–0, ret.
Runner-up 2. 28 July 1997 Los Angeles, U.S. Hard United States Jim Courier 4–6, 4–6
Winner 12. 9 February 1998 Marseille, France Hard (i) Russia Yevgeny Kafelnikov 6–4, 6–1
Runner-up 3. 2 March 1998 Philadelphia, U.S. Hard (i) United States Pete Sampras 5–7, 6–7(3–7)
Winner 13. 4 May 1998 Munich, Germany Clay United States Andre Agassi 6–7(4–7), 7–6(8–6), 6–3
Winner 14. 11 January 1999 Adelaide, Australia Hard Australia Lleyton Hewitt 4–6, 6–1, 6–2
Runner-up 4. 1 February 1999 Australian Open, Melbourne Hard Russia Yevgeny Kafelnikov 6–4, 0–6, 3–6, 6–7(1–7)
Winner 15. 1 November 1999 Stuttgart Indoor, Germany Hard (i) Netherlands Richard Krajicek 6–1, 6–4, 5–7, 7–5
Winner 16. 15 November 1999 Stockholm, Sweden Hard (i) Sweden Magnus Gustafsson 6–3, 6–4, 6–2
Runner-up 5. 10 January 2000 Adelaide, Australia Hard Australia Lleyton Hewitt 6–3, 3–6, 2–6
Runner-up 6. 20 March 2000 Indian Wells, U.S. Hard Spain Àlex Corretja 4–6, 4–6, 3–6
Winner 17. 5 July 2000 Cincinnati, U.S. Hard United Kingdom Tim Henman 7–6(7–5), 6–4
Runner-up 7. 28 August 2000 Long Island, U.S. Hard Sweden Magnus Norman 3–6, 7–5, 5–7
Winner 18. 30 October 2000 Basel, Switzerland Carpet (i) Switzerland Roger Federer 6–2, 4–6, 7–6(7–4), 1–6, 6–1
Winner 19. 18 February 2002 Marseille, France Hard (i) France Nicolas Escudé 6–7(4–7), 6–3, 6–1

Grand Slam Singles performance timeline[edit]

Tournament 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 Career SR Career Win-Loss
Grand Slam Tournaments
Australian Open A A Q2 2R 1R 2R 3R QF 4R 2R F 1R A 2R 1R 3R 1R 0 / 13 21–12
French Open A A A A 1R 1R 1R 1R A 3R 2R 3R 4R 2R 1R 3R 1R 0 / 12 11–12
Wimbledon A A Q1 A 1R A 1R 2R A 3R 3R 4R QF 2R 1R 3R 1R 0 / 11 15–11
U.S. Open A A A Q1 4R 3R 2R 4R A A 1R 4R 1R 3R 2R 2R A 0 / 10 16–10
Grand Slam SR 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 1 0 / 4 0 / 3 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 1 0 / 3 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 3 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 4 0 / 3 0 / 46 N/A
Annual Win-Loss 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–1 3–4 3–3 3–3 8–4 3–1 5–3 9–4 8–4 7–3 5–4 1–4 7–4 0–3 N/A 63–45
ATP Masters Series
Indian Wells NME A A A Q1 A 3R 2R 2R QF 1R F 2R QF 1R 1R 3R 0 / 11 16–11
Miami NME A A A 1R A 4R 2R 2R QF SF 4R 3R 3R 3R 1R 1R 0 / 12 15–11
Monte Carlo NME A A A 1R A 2R 2R 2R 1R 2R 2R 2R 1R A 1R A 0 / 10 4–10
Rome NME A A A A A A 3R A 1R 1R 3R 2R 3R 1R A Q1 0 / 7 7–7
Hamburg NME A A A 1R A A A A A A 2R 1R 1R A A A 0 / 4 1–4
Canada NME A A A A QF SF QF QF A 1R 3R 1R 1R Q2 1R A 0 / 9 13–9
Cincinnati NME A A A Q1 3R SF SF 2R A 2R W 1R 3R 2R 1R A 1 / 10 20–9
Stuttgart NME A 1R 3R 1R 2R QF 3R 2R A W 2R QF A 2R Q2 A 1 / 11 16–9
Paris NME A A A A A 2R W SF 1R 3R 2R 2R A A 1R Q1 1 / 8 11–7
Masters Series SR N/A 0 / 0 0 / 1 0 / 1 0 / 4 0 / 3 0 / 7 1 / 8 0 / 7 0 / 5 1 / 8 1 / 9 0 / 9 0 / 7 0 / 5 0 / 6 0 / 2 3 / 82 N/A
Annual Win-Loss N/A 0–0 0–0 0–1 0–4 6–3 15–7 14–7 6–6 6–5 13–7 19–7 8–9 8–7 4–5 0–6 2–2 N/A 103–77
Year End Ranking 1103 472 231 63 88 59 7 9 28 22 5 9 24 44 96 72 133 N/A

A = did not participate in the tournament
LQ = lost in the qualifying draw

External links[edit]

Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Russia Yevgeny Kafelnikov
ATP Most Improved Player
1995
Succeeded by
United Kingdom Tim Henman
Preceded by
Croatia Goran Ivanišević
ATP Champions Tour
Year-End No.1

2009, 2010
Succeeded by
Spain Carlos Moyá