Thomas George Roddick

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Sir Thomas George Roddick
Thomas George Roddick.png
Member of the Canadian Parliament
for St. Antoine
In office
1896–1904
Preceded by The electoral district was created in 1892
Succeeded by Herbert Brown Ames
Personal details
Born (1846-07-31)July 31, 1846
Harbor Grace, Newfoundland
Died February 20, 1923(1923-02-20) (aged 76)
Montreal, Quebec
Political party Conservative
Spouse(s) Urelia M McKinnon,
Amy Redpath Roddick

Sir Thomas George Roddick (July 31, 1846 – February 20, 1923) was a Canadian surgeon, medical administrator, and politician born in Harbor Grace, Newfoundland

Medical service[edit]

Thomas George Roddick attended the Model and Normal Schools in Truro, Nova Scotia and graduated from the Medical Faculty of McGill University in 1868 with the highest honours, winning the Holmes Gold Medal and Final Prize. From 1868 to 1874, he was Assistant House Surgeon at the Montreal General Hospital.[1] In 1872, he was appointed Lecturer on Hygiene at McGill University. He was appointed a Demonstrator of Anatomy in 1874 and in 1875 was named Professor of Clinical Surgery. Earlier in 1877, Roddick traveled to Edinburgh to witness Joseph Lister's medical antiseptic system.[2] Roddick returned to Montreal later that year and introduced Joseph Lister's antiseptic system, primarily his 'carbolic spray,' revolutionizing the way medicine was practiced in Montreal's Hospitals.[3] In 1894 Roddick, with the aid of fellow specialist James Bell, created the Department of Surgery and became the first chief surgeon of the Royal Victoria Hospital.[4] However, by 1901 Roddick found himself no longer able to practice surgery, having become allergic to the new antiseptic replacing the carbolic acid he had introduced to Montreal, iodoform.[5] He was instead given the position of Dean of the Faculty of Medicine at McGill University from 1901 to 1908, where he could contribute to medicine without practicing surgery.[6] In subsequent years Roddick would play an instrumental role in the creation of the Medical Council of Canada as well as establishing a common system of examinations for students graduating with medical degrees in Canada. [7]

Military service[edit]

He has served on the Militia Force as Assistant Surgeon Grand Trunk Rifle Brigade, and Surgeon Major Prince of Wales Rifles. On the outbreak of the North-West Rebellion in 1885, he was selected to take charge of medical affairs in the field, with the rank of Deputy-Surgeon General of Militia. He organized the hospitals and medical service for the Expeditionary Force, and was recommended for C.M.G. by the General in command.

Political service[edit]

He was elected to the Canadian House of Commons for the riding of St. Antoine in the 1896 federal election. A Conservative he was re-elected in 1900. He helped pass the "Roddick Bill" or Canada Medical Act which created a national medical licensing standard that allowed physicians to practice in every province in Canada. With the creation of the Medical Council of Canada in 1912 Roddick was named first on the Canadian Medical Register.[8]

He was President of the Canadian Medical Association and President of the British Medical Association. He was knighted in 1914.

Family[edit]

He was married to Urelia M McKinnon of Pointe-Claire, Quebec in 1880, but she died in Montreal in 1890. Then Amy Redpath Roddick became the second wife of Thomas Roddick on September 3, 1906. Amy Redpath Roddick (May 16, 1868 - February 16, 1954) was the first-born child and only daughter of Ada Mills and John James Redpath.


Death and Controversy[edit]

Sir Thomas Roddick died the 20th February 1923 and was buried at Mont Royal Cemetery on the 22nd.[9] However upon reading his Will on the 26th, six days after his death and four days after his burial, the executors of his Will realized his final wishes had been to be cremated and demanded Sir Roddick be exhumed and cremated according to his wishes.[10] Lady Roddick staunchly opposed his exhumation, stating her husband's final wishes had changed shortly before his death.[11] The case was brought before the Quebec Superior Court and was successfully contested by Mrs Roddick.[12]

Roddick is buried at Mont Royal Cemetery in section F4 1, where Mrs Amy Redpath Roddick erected a family funerary monument for her husband which mirrored that which she had erected at McGill University in his honor, the Roddick Gates.[13]

Honours[edit]

  • Sir Thomas Roddick Hospital built in early 1950s by the American Government in Newfoundland and Labrador is named in his honour.
  • McGill University's Roddick Gates were erected by Amy Roddick Redpath and named in his honour.[14]
  • Roddick fountain, in Harbor Grace, Newfoundland, is named in his honour.
  • He was knighted in 1912

References[edit]

  1. ^ Roddick, Sir Thomas George
  2. ^ Terry, Neville. The Royal Vic the story of Montreal's Royal Victoria Hospital, 1894-1994. Montréal, Qué.: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1994,75
  3. ^ Terry, Neville. The Royal Vic the story of Montreal's Royal Victoria Hospital, 1894-1994. Montréal, Qué.: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1994,75
  4. ^ Terry, Neville. The Royal Vic the story of Montreal's Royal Victoria Hospital, 1894-1994. Montréal, Qué.: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1994, 94
  5. ^ Terry, Neville. The Royal Vic the story of Montreal's Royal Victoria Hospital, 1894-1994. Montréal, Qué.: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1994,76
  6. ^ Terry, Neville. The Royal Vic the story of Montreal's Royal Victoria Hospital, 1894-1994. Montréal, Qué.: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1994,74,76
  7. ^ Terry, Neville. The Royal Vic the story of Montreal's Royal Victoria Hospital, 1894-1994. Montréal, Qué.: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1994,74
  8. ^ Terry, Neville. The Royal Vic the story of Montreal's Royal Victoria Hospital, 1894-1994. Montréal, Qué.: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1994,74
  9. ^ Young, Brian J., Respectable burial Montreal's Mount Royal Cemetery, Montreal, QC: McGill-Queen's University Press, 2003, 137
  10. ^ Young, Brian J., Respectable burial Montreal's Mount Royal Cemetery, Montreal, QC: McGill-Queen's University Press, 2003, 137
  11. ^ Young, Brian J., Respectable burial Montreal's Mount Royal Cemetery, Montreal, QC: McGill-Queen's University Press, 2003, 137
  12. ^ Young, Brian J., Respectable burial Montreal's Mount Royal Cemetery, Montreal, QC: McGill-Queen's University Press, 2003, 137
  13. ^ Young, Brian J., Respectable burial Montreal's Mount Royal Cemetery, Montreal, QC: McGill-Queen's University Press, 2003, 137
  14. ^ Young, Brian J., Respectable burial Montreal's Mount Royal Cemetery, Montreal, QC: McGill-Queen's University Press, 2003, 137

External links[edit]