Thomas Gray Hull

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Thomas Gray Hull (May 20, 1926 – July 29, 2008) was a United States federal judge.

Biography[edit]

Born in Greeneville, Tennessee to Hayes and Carrie Hull, had one sister, Mary Lou Hull Wexler, wife of Judge Ben K.Wexler of Greeneville. He was married to Joan Brandon Hull, mother of his four children for forty years. Mrs. Hull died in 1995. In 1999 he was married to Helge Hull who was devoted to his love and care throughout their lives together. Thomas Hull was a Corporal in the United States Army during World War II, from 1944 to 1946.Hull has also been a member of the Asbury United Methodist Church in Greenville since 1940 and a member of the American Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars since 1946. He received a J.D. from the University of Tennessee College of Law in 1951. He was in private practice in Greeneville, Tennessee from 1951 to 1972. Beginning in 1951, Judge Hull was a general practice lawyer in Greeneville, Tennesse. He was a member of the Tennessee House of Representatives from 1955 to 1965. He was a Chief clerk, Tennessee House of Representatives from 1969 to 1970. He was a judge on the 20th Judicial Circuit of Tennessee from 1972 to 1979. In 1979, he and his brother-in-law Carl Brandon bought controlling interest of a bank in Greeneville, now known as Andrew Johnson Bank. He also was instrumental in the formation of Greeneville Federal Bank, where his son serves as president. He was a Legal counsel to Governor Lamar Alexander, Tennessee from 1979 to 1981. He was in private practice in Greeneville, Tennessee from 1981 to 1982.

Hull was a federal judge on the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Tennessee. Hull was nominated by President Ronald Reagan on October 24, 1983, to a seat vacated by Frank W. Wilson. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on November 9, 1983, and received his commission on November 14, 1983. He served as chief judge from 1984-1991. He assumed senior status on October 1, 2002. Hull served in that capacity until a tuesday, July 29, 2008, due to an extended illness which lead to his death.

He died in Greeneville, Tennessee.

Sources[edit]