Thomas J. O'Brien (Michigan politician)

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For other people of the same name, see Thomas J. O'Brien (disambiguation).
Thomas J. O'Brien (Michigan politician)
OBrien USAmbassador 1910 Japan.jpg
The Honorable Thomas J. O'Brien, U.S. Ambassador to Japan, in 1910.
U.S. Ambassador to Denmark
In office
1905–1907
President Theodore Roosevelt
Preceded by Laurits S. Swenson
Succeeded by Maurice Francis Egan
U.S. Ambassador to Japan
In office
1907–1911
President Theodore Roosevelt
Preceded by Luke E. Wright
Succeeded by Charles Page Bryan
U.S. Ambassador to Italy
In office
1911–1913
President William Howard Taft
Preceded by John G. A. Leishman
Succeeded by Thomas Nelson Page
Personal details
Born Thomas J. O'Brien
(1842-07-30)30 July 1842
Jackson, Michigan
Died 19 May 1933(1933-05-19) (aged 90)
Nationality  United States
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Delia Howard O'Brien (1848-1926)
Alma mater University of Michigan

Thomas James O’Brien (July 30, 1842 – May 19, 1933) was a politician and diplomat from the U.S state of Michigan.

O'Brien was born in Jackson, Michigan, on July 30, 1842, the son of Timothy O'Brien and Elizabeth Lander O'Brien. On September 4, 1873, he married Delia Howard (July 14, 1848 - January 22, 1926).[1][2]

O'Brien was a lawyer by profession and a Republican politician. In 1883 he was an unsuccessful candidate for the office of Justice of the Michigan Supreme Court. In 1896 and 1904 he was a delegate to the Republican National Convention from Michigan.

Ambassador[edit]

O’Brien, a graduate of the University of Michigan law school, held the following posts as ambassador of the United States:

Death[edit]

O’Brien died on May 19, 1933. He is buried with his wife at Oakhill Cemetery in Grand Rapids, Michigan.[3][4]

Notes[edit]

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]

While serving as U.S. Ambassador to Japan, O'Brien (right center) looks on as Rear Admiral John Hubbard (right foreground) presents a loving cup to the Imperial Japanese Navy on behalf of the U.S. Atlantic Fleet in Tokyo, Japan, in January 1910 in recognition of the courtesy extended to the "Great White Fleet" during its October 1908 visit to Japan. Admiral Saitō Makoto (left foreground) accepts it; Admiral Heihachiro Togo is just beyond and to left of Saitō.
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Laurits S. Swenson
U.S. Ambassador to Denmark
1905–1907
Succeeded by
Maurice Francis Egan
Preceded by
Luke E. Wright
U.S. Ambassador to Japan
1907–1911
Succeeded by
Charles Page Bryan
Preceded by
John G. A. Leishman
U.S. Ambassador to Italy
1911–1913
Succeeded by
Thomas Nelson Page