Thor: Vikings

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Thor: Vikings
Cover of the 1st issue
Publication information
Publisher MAX Comics, Marvel Comics
Schedule Monthly
Format Limited series
Genre
Publication date September 2003 – January 2004
Number of issues 5
Main character(s) Thor, Doctor Strange
Creative team
Writer(s) Garth Ennis
Artist(s) Glenn Fabry
Letterer(s) Dave Sharpe
Colorist(s) Paul Mounts
Editor(s) Joe Quesada
Collected editions
Thor: Vikings ISBN 978-0-7851-1175-7

Thor: Vikings is a 5-issue comic book limited series published by MAX Comics, an imprint of Marvel Comics for adult audiences, in July – November 2003. Written by Garth Ennis and illustrated by Glenn Fabry, the series follows Thor's adventures against a group of thousand-year-old zombie Vikings who attack New York City.[1][2][3]

Publication history[edit]

The series is composed of five comics :

  • Thor: Vikings #1 "Endless Ocean"
  • Thor: Vikings #2 "Kingdom of Iron"
  • Thor: Vikings #3 "Time Like a River"
  • Thor: Vikings #4 "Fight the Good Fight"
  • Thor: Vikings #5 "See You In Valhalla"

The comics are rated parental advisory/explicit content.[3]

Plot synopsis[edit]

In 1003 AD, along the west coast of Norway, Lord Harald Jaekelsson and his Vikings raid the town of Lakstad. After having their way with the women and killing nearly all the villagers, they decide to leave for the New World. But the town wise man, the last survivor, with the help of a runestone, places a curse on them. He pleads with the gods that they never reach their destination. Harald takes a bow and shoots the wise man dead, and they sail on. They sail for 1000 years, until they finally land at the South Street Seaport in New York. They are not human any more; they are powerful zombies. They kill everyone they encounter, and are about to have fun with a woman when Thor shows up.[4]

Harald Jaekelsson recognizes the Avenger as the god of thunder. Not afraid of him, he beats Thor without difficulty, ties Mjolnir to him, then tosses him in the Hudson. His men continue their reign of terror over New York. They create a mountain of severed heads. They fight and defeat policemen and army. Their Viking ship, magically powered by the spell, can fly in the streets and throw fire. Thor manages to pull himself out of the river; Doctor Strange is waiting for him.[5]

A journalist and his cameraman cover the story of the invasion. They are interviewing the mayor when a spear goes through his head. After recovering in Doctor Strange's house, Thor follows him into a room where a mystic river runs, "somewhere time flows by like a river and may be observed as such." This allows the sorcerer to look at the past, seeking for answers. There, they discover how Harald and his crew came to be so powerful. The death of the town wise man provided too much blood for the spell. They figure out that to stop Harald and his Vikings, they need descendants of his bloodline. They look through time and select three mighty warriors and bring them forward to help: Sigrid, a Viking battle maiden, Magnus of the Danes, a Teutonic knight, and Erik Loonroth, a Luftwaffe Messerschmitt pilot in the Second World War. Meanwhile, the Avengers - Captain America, Iron Man, Vision, the Scarlet Witch, and Hawkeye - have been defeated and need medical assistance. More Marines are sent to fight against Harald and his men.[6]

A helicopter flies over the city and discovers the heads of the Marines on pikes in the street. Doctor Strange and Thor ask Harald Jaekelsson's descendants to fight with them. They are all ready to fight for a noble cause, especially Erik. Doctor Strange uses their blood to empower a spell to make them as strong as the undead Vikings, and they go to fight them. Harald now has a bone throne at the top of the Empire State Building. The heroes defy him. The Messerschmitt attacks the flying Viking ship.[7]

The heroes stage an assault on Harald Jaekelsson's forces, Erik in the air, the others fighting on the ground. In a moment of inattention, Harald strikes Thor in the back. He knock out Sigrid and wounds Magnus. The God of Thunder fights back. In the air, the Vikings jump onto Erik's airplane. The pilot bails out safely with his parachute and lets the plane crash into the ship, destroying them both. All Harald's dead Vikings are destroyed. Out of respect, Sigrid, Magnus and Erik decide to not help Thor finish Harald. The Avenger sends him directly off earth and into space. Finally, the three warriors return to the time of their own war. When they disappear, Thor says: "I will see thou in Valhalla"[8]

Collected editions[edit]

The trade paperback Thor: Vikings collecting #1-5 was published in February 2004 (ISBN 9780785111757)

Reception[edit]

Each comic of the series Thor: Vikings was in the 70 first places of the Top 300 Comics in terms of sales for each comic in 2003.[9][10][11][12][13]

The trade paperback Thor: Vikings reached 5th place in the Top 50 Graphic Novels/TPB's in terms of sales in February 2004.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Weiland, Jonah (April 24, 2003). "Marvel Comics Solicitations for July, 2003". Comic Book Resources News. Retrieved September 5, 2010. 
  2. ^ Weiland, Jonah (August 26, 2003). "Marvel Comics Solicitations for product shipping November, 2003". Comic Book Resources News. Retrieved September 5, 2010. 
  3. ^ a b "Thor: Vikings #5". Marvel Comics catalog. Retrieved September 5, 2010. 
  4. ^ Garth Ennis (w), Glenn Fabry (p), "Endless Ocean", Thor: Vikings #1 (September 2003), MAX Comics
  5. ^ Garth Ennis (w), Glenn Fabry (p), "Kingdom of Iron", Thor: Vikings #2 (November 2003), MAX Comics
  6. ^ Garth Ennis (w), Glenn Fabry (p), "Time Like a River", Thor: Vikings #3 (October 2003), MAX Comics
  7. ^ Garth Ennis (w), Glenn Fabry (p), "Fight the Good Fight", Thor: Vikings #4 (December 2003), MAX Comics
  8. ^ Garth Ennis (w), Glenn Fabry (p), "See You In Valhalla", Thor: Vikings #5 (January 2004), MAX Comics
  9. ^ Weiland, Jonah (August 13, 2003). "Market Share, Top 300 Comics, Top 50 Graphic Novels Actual Sales for July, 2003". Comic Book Resources News. Retrieved September 5, 2010. 
  10. ^ Weiland, Jonah (September 8, 2003). "Market Share, Top 300 Comics, Top 50 Graphic Novels Actual Sales for August, 2003". Comic Book Resources News. Retrieved September 5, 2010. 
  11. ^ Weiland, Jonah (October 6, 2003). "Market Share, Top 300 Comics, Top 50 Graphic Novels Actual Sales for September, 2003". Comic Book Resources News. Retrieved September 5, 2010. 
  12. ^ Weiland, Jonah (November 11, 2003). "Market Share, Top 300 Comics, Top 50 Graphic Novels Actual Sales for October, 2003". Comic Book Resources News. Retrieved September 5, 2010. 
  13. ^ Weiland, Jonah (December 9, 2003). "Market Share, Top 300 Comics, Top 50 Graphic Novels Actual Sales for November, 2003". Comic Book Resources News. Retrieved September 5, 2010. 
  14. ^ Weiland, Jonah (March 12, 2004). "Market Share, Top 300 Comics, Top 100 Graphic Novels for February, 2004". Comic Book Resources News. Retrieved September 5, 2010. 

External links[edit]