Thorpe B. Isaacson

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Thorpe B. Isaacson
Photograph of Thorpe B. Isaacson
Assistant to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles
January 23, 1970 (1970-01-23) – November 9, 1970 (1970-11-09)
Called by Joseph Fielding Smith
Counselor in the First Presidency
October 28, 1965 (1965-10-28) – January 18, 1970 (1970-01-18)
Called by David O. McKay
End reason Dissolution of First Presidency on the death of David O. McKay
Assistant to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles
September 30, 1961 (1961-09-30) – October 28, 1965 (1965-10-28)
Called by David O. McKay
End reason Called as Counselor in the First Presidency
First Counselor in the Presiding Bishopric
April 6, 1952 (1952-04-06) – September 30, 1961 (1961-09-30)
Called by Joseph L. Wirthlin
End reason Honorable release of Joseph L. Wirthlin and his counselors
Second Counselor in the Presiding Bishopric
December 12, 1946 (1946-12-12) – April 6, 1952 (1952-04-06)
Called by LeGrand Richards
End reason Honorable release of LeGrand Richards and his counselors
Personal details
Born Henry Thorpe Beal Isaacson
(1898-09-06)September 6, 1898
Ephraim, Utah, United States
Died November 9, 1970(1970-11-09) (aged 72)
Salt Lake City, Utah, United States
Resting place Salt Lake City Cemetery
40°46′37.92″N 111°51′28.8″W / 40.7772000°N 111.858000°W / 40.7772000; -111.858000 (Salt Lake City Cemetery)

Henry Thorpe Beal Isaacson (September 6, 1898 – November 9, 1970) was a leader in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), serving as a counselor in the First Presidency to church president David O. McKay from 1965 to 1970.

Isaacson was born in Ephraim, Sanpete County, Utah to parents Martin Isaacson and Mary Jemima Beal. Isaacson received his education at Snow Academy (now Snow College), Brigham Young University, Utah State University and the University of California-Berkeley.

On June 20, 1920 Isaacson married Lula Maughan Jones in the Salt Lake Temple. They eventually became the parents of two children. Isaacson worked as a school teacher and athletic coach in Idaho and later was a school district superintendent. He also was involved in insurance sales and real estate. Isaacson also served for a time on the Utah State University Board of Trustees.

He was ordained a high priest in 1941 by Charles A. Callis of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. In 1946 he became a second counselor to Presiding Bishop LeGrand Richards, and then as first counselor to Presiding Bishop Joseph L. Wirthlin in 1952. In 1961 he was sustained as an Assistant to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles.

On October 28, 1965, Isaacson was sustained as a counselor to church president David O. McKay in the First Presidency of the church. Isaacson suffered a stroke on February 7, 1966, which severely limited his activities as a counselor. Alvin R. Dyer was added as a counselor to the First Presidency to fill the role Isaacson was to perform. Isaacson was released from the First Presidency upon McKay's death on January 18, 1970, and resumed his former position as an Assistant to the Twelve.

Isaacson died in Salt Lake City, Utah and was buried at the Salt Lake City Cemetery.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • 2004 Church Almanac, published by Deseret Morning News, page 61,62
  • Leon R. Hartshorn. Outstanding Stories by General Authorities. (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Company, 1975) Vol. 3, p. 175.
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints titles
Assistant to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles
January 23, 1970 – November 9, 1970
September 30, 1961 – October 28, 1965
Vacant
Title last held by
Hugh B. Brown
as Third Counselor in the First Presidency 
Counselor in the First Presidency
October 28, 1965 – January 18, 1970
Served alongside:
Joseph Fielding Smith (October 29, 1965 - January 18, 1970)
Alvin R. Dyer (April 6, 1968 – January 18, 1970)
Vacant
Title next held by
Gordon B. Hinckley
Preceded by
Joseph L. Wirthlin
First Counselor in the Presiding Bishopric
April 6, 1952 – September 30, 1961
Succeeded by
Robert L. Simpson
Secound Counselor in the Presiding Bishopric
December 12, 1946 – April 6, 1952
Succeeded by
Carl W. Buehner