Thunder in the Morning Calm

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Thunder in the Morning Calm is a 2011 legal-thriller/political thriller written by Don Brown. Thunder in the Morning Calm, a novel that explores the question of whether American servicemen who were listed as MIAs may still be alive in North Korea from the Korean War, was released in the summer of 2011.Thunder in the Morning Calm [1] was the first novel released in Zondervan's Pacific Rim Series, and Brown has stated in interviews that he penned the novel in part to bring attention to the issue of Korean War POWs detained in North Korea, referring to Americans left behind in North Korean prison camps at the end of the Korean War.[2] Thunder in the Morning Calm is the first of three novels in Don Brown's Pacific Rim Series[3][4]

In 1996, the Eisenhower Presidential Library, also known as the Eisenhower Presidential Center released previously classified documents revealing that the United States left more than 900 men in North Korean prison camps at the end of the war in 1953. At the time, the United States, South Korea and North Korea all denied that Americans were still captured behind the borders. Those 900 Americans have never been accounted for. [5]

According to Brown, eyewitness accounts of elderly Americans in North Korea continued to leak out until 2005 or 2005. He has raised the question about the possibility of some Americans still being alive there, pointing out that some American veterans of the Civil War lived for as long as seventy five years after the Battle of Gettysburg. [6] Brown has cited reports of sightings of elderly Americans held in North Korea in the years after the war.[7][8]

The storyline in Thunder in the Morning Calm centers around a young naval intelligence officer, who, when discovering secret documents about Americans being left behind in North Korean, finances his own covert mission into North Korea to search for clues about his grandfather, who is Missing in Action from the Korean War.

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