Thunderbolt (Six Flags New England)

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Thunderbolt
Thunderbolt, Six Flags New England Entrance.jpg
Ride Entrance
Six Flags New England
Coordinates 42°2′20″N 72°36′48″W / 42.03889°N 72.61333°W / 42.03889; -72.61333Coordinates: 42°2′20″N 72°36′48″W / 42.03889°N 72.61333°W / 42.03889; -72.61333
Status Operating
Opening date 1941
General statistics
Type Wood
Manufacturer Joseph E. Drambour
Designer Harry Baker
Track layout Figure Eight
Height 70 ft (21 m)
Length 2,600 ft (790 m)
Speed 40 mph (64 km/h)
Duration 1:00
Height restriction 48 in (122 cm)
Flash Pass Available
Thunderbolt at RCDB
Pictures of Thunderbolt at RCDB

Thunderbolt is a wooden roller coaster located at Six Flags New England. Opened in 1941, It was designed by Harry Baker and Harry Traver, and built by Joseph Drambour.[1] Thunderbolt is the oldest roller coaster at Six Flags New England. It is also the oldest roller coaster in any Six Flags park (the Wild One at Six Flags America was built in 1917, but it was relocated from another park and has only been at Six Flags America since 1985). The single PTC train has 4 cars, and an individual lap bar and seatbelt for each person. An attendant has to manually unlock each car's lap bars by stepping on and pushing down a release bar at the front of each car. [2] The Thunderbolt Roller Coaster was dedicated an ACE Coaster Landmark on August 2, 2008. It has also recently received a new coat of paint.

History[edit]

The track, train and plans for Thunderbolt were purchased by park owner Edward Carroll Sr. from the 1939 New York World's Fair.[3] When it opened in 1941, it was called Cyclone; the ride was renamed Thunderbolt in 1964.[2]

The Thunderbolt has recently been refurbished and given a new coat of paint.

External Websites[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Roller Coaster Database, http://www.rcdb.com/182.htm
  2. ^ a b Commemorative plaque at park from American Coaster Enthusiasts, http://www.aceonline.org/census/PhotoDetail.aspx?ID=6068
  3. ^ Cecchi, David. Images of America Riverside Park. Arcadia Publishing, 2011, pg. 81