Thursday Night Baseball

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Thursday Night Baseball
Format Major League Baseball
Starring Bob Costas
Matt Vasgersian
Rich Waltz (occasionally)
Al Leiter
Joe Magrane
Dan Plesac
Harold Reynolds
Jim Kaat
Mitch Williams
Sam Ryan
Theme music composer David Robidoux[1]
Country of origin United States
Production
Running time 3 hours (approximate)
Broadcast
Original channel MLB Network
Picture format 480i (SD)
720p (HD)
Original run April 9, 2009 – present

Thursday Night Baseball (also known as MLB Network Showcase) is the title of a presentation of Major League Baseball on cable and satellite channel MLB Network (self-produced by MLB Network), that premiered on April 9, 2009.[2] Longtime NBC Sports broadcaster Bob Costas is one of the play-by-play voices of the broadcasts.[3] Matt Vasgersian also does play-by-play on some games. Al Leiter, Joe Magrane, Dan Plesac, Harold Reynolds, Mitch Williams and Jim Kaat provide color commentary.[4] (Victor Rojas also did play-by-play during the 2009 season, but left the MLB Network to join the LA Angels broadcast team in 2010.) The new network produces 26 non-exclusive live games a year on Thursday nights. Since one or both teams' local TV rights holders also carry the games, the MLB Network feed is subject to local blackouts. In that event, the cities in the blacked-out markets will instead see a simulcast of another scheduled game via one team's local TV rights holder.

Former versions[edit]

The USA Thursday Game of the Week (1979–1983)[edit]

From 1979–1983, the USA Network broadcast Major League Baseball games under the Thursday Game of the Week banner.

The series began April 26, 1979 with a doubleheader: Cleveland at Kansas City[5] (Jim Woods/Bud Harrelson) followed by Baltimore at California[6] (Monte Moore/Maury Wills). The second game of the night was typically, based out of the West Coast. The games were usually blacked out of the competing teams' cities. Once in a while, when USA did a repeat of the telecast late at night, local cities were allowed to show the rerun.

From 1980–1981, Woods and Nelson Briles (replacing Harrelson) did the early games (except for a game at Montreal on October 2, 1980, which reunited Woods with onetime Boston Red Sox radio partner Ned Martin), while Moore and Wes Parker (replacing Wills) called the late game.

In 1982, doubleheaders did not start until June 17. Prior to the doubleheaders starting, Moore and Parker did the individual game until then. When the doubleheaders finally began, Moore and Parker moved over to the late game for the rest of the year. Meanwhile, Eddie Doucette (replacing Jim Woods) and Nelson Briles were assigned to call the early game.

USA continued with the plan of not starting doubleheaders until June in the final year of the package in 1983. Steve Zabriskie and Al Albert filled in for Eddie Doucette in September 1982 (Steve Grad also occasionally substituted) while Albert replaced Doucette for a game or more in 1983.

ABC Thursday Night Baseball (1989)[edit]

In 1989, the ABC network aired Thursday night Major League Baseball games after having broadcast Monday Night Baseball (and occasional Sunday afternoon games) since 1976. This was ABC's final year of consecutive baseball coverage (teaming with NBC, which had telecast Saturday afternoon games since 1966 and Major League Baseball in general since 1947) due to CBS signing a four-year contract (spanning from 1990–1993) to become the exclusive national broadcast network provider for Major League Baseball games.

Al Michaels was ABC's lead play-by-play commentator alongside color commentators Jim Palmer and Tim McCarver. Meanwhile, Gary Thorne was the backup play-by-play man alongside Joe Morgan (who had worked with Gary Bender the previous season) on color commentary.

Fox Sports Net coverage (1997-2001)[edit]

In 1997, as part of the contract with Major League Baseball it had signed the year before, Fox gained an additional outlet for its coverage. Its recently-launched cable sports network, Fox Sports Net, was given rights to two Thursday night games per week, one for the Eastern and Central time zones and one for the Mountain and Pacific time zones. In 2000, as part of an exclusive contract Fox signed with MLB, that coverage passed to Fox Family Channel and was reduced to one game per week. After the 2000 season, Fox also gained rights to the entire postseason and moved a large portion of its Division Series coverage to Fox Family. This lasted for one season due to The Walt Disney Company making a bid for Fox Family. As part of the negotiations Fox Family was renamed ABC Family and ESPN gained the rights to Fox Family and FX's MLB coverage, although the 2002 Division Series aired on ABC Family due to contractual issues, but with ESPN production, a sign of things to come at ABC Sports. Control of the overall contract remained with Fox, meaning they could renegotiate following the 2006 season and not allow ESPN to retain its postseason coverage. For the 2007 season Fox did exactly that, and TBS is now the cable home of the postseason as part of its new baseball contract.

Play-by-play announcers for the FSN/Fox Family coverage included Kenny Albert, Thom Brennaman, Chip Caray, Josh Lewin, and Steve Physioc. Color analysts included Bob Brenly, Kevin Kennedy, Steve Lyons, and Jeff Torborg. Occasionally FSN would simulcast a local-team feed of a game from one of its affiliated regional sports networks in lieu of a dedicated national production.

ESPN Thursday Night Baseball (2003–2006)[edit]

ESPN Thursday Night Baseball aired on either ESPN or ESPN2 from 2003–2006 and featured one game per week. It aired every Thursday at either 1 p.m. ET, 7 p.m. ET, 7:30 p.m. ET or 8:00 ET. Castrol served as the presenting sponsor for the telecasts.

The play-by-play commentator was Chris Berman along with either Joe Morgan or Eric Karros as color commentator. In 2006, Duke Castiglione joined the broadcast as the field reporter.

ESPN Thursday Night Baseball was discontinued after the 2006 season because the broadcast rights to the package were lost to TBS. TBS shows the games on Sunday afternoons that ESPN previously aired on Thursday nights. This is largely because the games were a byproduct of a deal Fox made to air games on its own cable channels, before opting to sell what is now ABC Family to Disney. The games were then moved to ESPN and ESPN2. Thursday Night Baseball was replaced with MLS Primetime Thursday.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "David Robidoux". APM Music. Retrieved 2012-11-28. 
  2. ^ Sandomir, Richard (October 2, 2008). "A Network to Satisfy the Appetite of Baseball-Hungry Fans". The New York Times. p. D8. 
  3. ^ Costas Joins MLB Network's Team Multichannel News February 3, 2009
  4. ^ "MLB Network Sets Thursday Night Baseball Lineup". TV Week. March 25, 2009. 
  5. ^ Apr 26, 1979, Indians at Royals Play by Play and Box Score
  6. ^ Apr 26, 1979, Orioles at Angels Play by Play and Box Score
  7. ^ REYNOLDS, MIKE (July 23, 2001). "Baseball Connects with Younger Viewers". Multichannel News. Retrieved 2008-05-21.