Tim Armstrong (executive)

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Tim Armstrong
Tim Armstrong in 2009.jpg
Armstrong in 2009
Born Timothy M. Armstrong
(1971-12-21) December 21, 1971 (age 42)
United States
Occupation CEO
Salary $12.1 million (2012) [1][2]

Timothy M. "Tim" Armstrong[3] (born December 21, 1971)[4][5] is CEO and Chairman of AOL Inc. Previously, he was President of Google's Americas operation.[6] He replaced the outgoing Randy Falco as current CEO as of March 12, 2009. He was also one of the cofounders of the local news website Patch Media.[7][8]

Biography[edit]

Education[edit]

He is a 1993 graduate of Connecticut College with a double major in Economics and Sociology.[9][10][11]

Other roles and activities[edit]

Armstrong sits on the boards of the Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB), the Advertising Council, and the Advertising Research Foundation, and is a trustee at Connecticut College and Lawrence Academy.[12] He was also a founder of the United Football League and is the owner of the Boston Blazers of the National Lacrosse League.[13]

On behalf of NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg, he chaired Media.NYC.2020,[14] which reviewed the future of the global media industry, the implications for NYC, and suggested actionable next steps for the NYC government.

Controversies[edit]

In August 2013 an audio recording was leaked of Armstrong offhandedly firing an employee earlier that month during a conference call with over 1000 attending for taking a photo of the event.[15] Tim Armstrong has publicly apologized for the firing of the employee since then, but did not offer to reverse the firing or provide any compensation.[16]

In February 2014, Armstrong claimed that ObamaCare and two “distressed babies” increased healthcare costs for AOL by $7.1 million per year and that, as a result, 401(k) contribution benefits for rank-and-file employees would be modified so employees that left before the end of the year, received no company contribution towards their 401(k).[1][17]

References[edit]

Notes

  1. ^ a b Lynn, Jia. "AOL chief cuts 401(k) benefits, blames Obamacare and two "distressed babies"". Washingtonpost.com. Retrieved February 10, 2014. 
  2. ^ Could AOL CEO Tim Armstrong’s salary pay for health care? – Megan McArdle, Bloomberg News
  3. ^ Vega, Tanzina (August 9, 2011). "AOL Shares Fall on Report of Weak Gain in Ad Sales". New York Times. 
  4. ^ Metz, Rachel (May 13, 2011). "CEO Tim Armstrong on AOL's turnaround". USA Today. Associated Press. "Armstrong, 40" 
  5. ^ Kopytoff, Verne G. (August 17, 2011). "That Remake of AOL? It’s Still Being Written". New York Times. "Armstrong, 40" 
  6. ^ Kell, John (March 12, 2009). "Time Warner: Google Executive Tim Armstrong Named AOL Chairman, CEO". CNN Money. Dow Jones Newswires. Archived from the original on March 12, 2009. Retrieved March 13, 2009. 
  7. ^ Cain Miller, Claire; Stone, Brad (April 12, 2009). "'Hyperlocal' Web Sites Deliver News Without Newspapers". The New York Times. 
  8. ^ Schonfeld, Erick (June 11, 2009). "AOL Buys Local Startups Going And Patch (And CEO Tim Armstrong Brings an Investment In-House)". TechCrunch. 
  9. ^ "Tim Armstrong Named Chairman and CEO of AOL" (Press release). AOL. March 2009. [dead link]
  10. ^ "Armstrong praised for teamwork". CamelTracks. Connecticut College. March 15, 2009. 
  11. ^ Benner, Ellie (April 19, 2011). "AOL CEO Tim Armstrong ’93 discusses career path since Conn". The College Voice. 
  12. ^ "At a glance-Tim Armstrong". Forbes. Retrieved April 8, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Executives". United Football League. 2010. Archived from the original on April 16, 2010. Retrieved April 15, 2010. 
  14. ^ Strauss, Steven; Kristy Sundjaja; Peter Robinson; Andrew Chen (2012). Media.NYC.2020. NYCEDC. 
  15. ^ Nicholas Carlson, provided by (August 9, 2013). "AOL CEO Tim Armstrong Fired Patch's Creative Director In Front Of 1,000 Coworkers (AOL)". SFGate. Retrieved February 10, 2014. 
  16. ^ Kaufman, Leslie (August 13, 2013). "AOL Chief Apologizes Over Firing of Worker". The New York Times. 
  17. ^ My Baby and AOL’s Bottom Line – Slate

Further reading

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Randy Falco
CEO of AOL
2009–present
Succeeded by
Incumbent