Tim McFeeley

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Tim McFeeley (born 1946 in Johnstown, New York) is a lawyer and gay activist. He is the Executive Director of the Center for Policy Alternatives (CPA),[1] a progressive political non profit.

McFeeley received his bachelor's degree from Princeton University and his J.D. from Harvard Law School.[2] He practiced law[3] in Boston for 17 years, first as an associate at a mid-sized law firm and later as corporate counsel for National Medical Care, Inc., an organization that provided a variety of specialized health care services and products.[4]

In Boston, McFeeley was active in civic and political activities and served on the boards of directors of Gay & Lesbian Advocates and Defenders and Boston Aging Concerns. McFeeley was a founder of both the Boston Lesbian and Gay Political Alliance and Bay State Stonewall Democrats.[5]

From 1989-95, McFeeley served as Executive Director of the Human Rights Campaign, a national gay activist organization.[6][7] In 1993 McFeeley directed HRCF's endeavors to lift the ban against gay and lesbian members of the Armed Services, an unsuccessful effort that led to the "don't ask, don't tell" policy. During that spring, McFeeley was part of the first delegation of gay and lesbian leaders to meet with the President, Bill Clinton in the Oval Office.[8]

Following his departure from HRCF in January 1995, McFeeley provided consulting services to a variety of for-profit and nonprofit organizations, including the National Senior Citizens Law Center, Common Cause, the National Association of Commissions for Women, and the National Stonewall Democrats. Since January 2001, McFeeley has served as Political Director for the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force.[9]

McFeeley authored The Price of Access, a book that describes and analyzes the federal end-stage renal disease program.[1][10]

McFeeley resides in Washington, D.C. and Provincetown, Massachusetts with his spouse, Robert J. Mondzak.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Friedman, Eli A. (2002). "Book Review The Price of Access By Tim McFeeley. 400 pp. Nashua, N.H., MDL Press, 2001. $27.95. 0-9716058-0-7". New England Journal of Medicine 346 (25): 2016–2017. doi:10.1056/NEJM200206203462521. ISSN 0028-4793. 
  2. ^ "A CONVERSATION WITH TIM MCFEELEY GAY RIGHTS CAMPAIGNER". Rocky Mountain News. January 26, 1994. Retrieved 20 May 2012. 
  3. ^ Eaklor, Vicki (2006-04-11). Bringing Lesbian and Gay Rights Into the Mainstream: Twenty Years of Progress. Psychology Press. pp. 171–. ISBN 9781560235262. Retrieved 2 September 2012. 
  4. ^ Robinson, John (Mar 6, 1986). "REUSE OF DIALYSIS DEVICES UNDER FIRE". Boston Globe. p. 6. Retrieved 2 September 2012. 
  5. ^ Jacobs, Ethan (April 5, 2008). "Pride goes green". EDGE Boston. Retrieved 17 September 2012. 
  6. ^ Schmalz, Jeffrey (February 7, 1993). "Gay Groups Regrouping For War on Military Ban". The New York Times. Retrieved 2010-04-16. 
  7. ^ Dunlap, David W. (6 November 1994). "THE 1994 CAMPAIGN: HOMOSEXUALITY; Struggle Over Gay Rights Moves to Statewide Level". The New York Times. p. 30. Retrieved 20 May 2012. 
  8. ^ Weisberg, Stuart E. (2009-09-30). Barney Frank: The Story of America's Only Left-Handed, Gay, Jewish Congressman. Univ of Massachusetts Press. pp. 400–. ISBN 9781558497214. Retrieved 2 September 2012. 
  9. ^ Publishing, Here (2001-06-19). The Advocate. Here Publishing. pp. 33–. Retrieved 2 September 2012. 
  10. ^ McFeeley, Tim (2001), The price of access : the story of life and death and money and the first national health care program and the three doctors who changed medicine in America forever, MDL Press, ISBN 978-0-9716058-0-0 

External links[edit]

Human Rights Campaign
Preceded by
Vic Basile
Executive Director
June 1989 – January 1995
Succeeded by
Elizabeth Birch