Tim Morehouse

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Tim Morehouse
Tim Morehouse.jpg
Morehouse in 2008
Medal record
Competitor for  United States
Men's Fencing
Olympic Games
Silver 2008 Beijing Sabre Team
President Barack Obama participates in a fencing demonstration with Tim Morehouse on the White House lawn

Timothy Frank "Tim" Morehouse[1][2] (born July 29, 1978) is an American fencer who won a Silver Medal competing in the men's sabre as a member of the United States fencing team, at the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing. Morehouse is coached by Yury Gelman.

Early life[edit]

Morehouse is the son of Eloise and John Morehouse.[3] He grew up in the Riverdale section of the Bronx in New York City. He originally took up fencing at Riverdale Country School in order to be excused from gym class.[4] In high school, he played on the Riverdale Country School's baseball team all four years and was a member of the cross country running team for one year.[4] He was the fencing team's captain and most valuable player during his junior and senior years at the school.[5]

Higher education[edit]

Morehouse received a bachelor's degree from Brandeis University in 2000, majoring in History. He was awarded a masters degree in Teaching from Pace University in 2003.[5][6]

Religious/ethnic heritage[edit]

His maternal grandmother was a Jewish immigrant who escaped Nazi Germany in the 1930s; she later joined the Quakers.[1] Morehouse was raised with a "mixture" of religious traditions. He spoke in an interview before the 2012 Olympics about how his "sense of being Jewish" is based on the experiences of his maternal grandmother, and that he plans to participate in the 2013 Maccabiah Games, an international Jewish athletic event held in Israel every four years.[1][7][8]

Fencing career[edit]

Morehouse won a Silver Medal competing in the men's sabre as a member of the United States fencing team, at the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing. He is a two-time individual U.S. National Champion (2010 and 2011) and was the number-one-ranked U.S. men's saber fencer from 2008-2011. He trains with Yury Gelman at the Manhattan Fencing Center, and at Bodhizone Human Performance and Sports Physical Therapy in New York City.

College[edit]

Morehouse attended Brandeis University, where he was ranked in the top 10 of the NCAA's Division I men's sabre in each of his final three years at the school (ranked tenth in 1998, sixth in 1999 and fourth in 2000). He was honored as an NCAA All-American in each of those years. He was voted by coaches and athletes as NCAA men's sabre fencer of the year in 2000. Morehouse led Brandeis to be ranked tenth among all Division I schools in 2000.

Olympics[edit]

Morehouse was selected as an alternate on the U.S. Fencing Team at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, after mounting a comeback and defeating Ahmed Yilla at the U.S. Fencing National Championship in Atlanta, where he competed as part of Fencers Club. As a replacement, Morehouse was ineligible for individual competition but could participate as a substitute in team competition.[9] Morehouse was ranked 16th in the world in 2007.[4]

Morehouse competed in men's sabre at the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, and won the Silver Medal. In the 2012 London Olympic Games, he lost in the individual quarterfinals to Diego Occhiuzzi of Italy, who went on to win silver. In the team event Morehouse was one of two fencers from the Beijing Olympics still on the team, the other being James Williams.[10] The team eventually came in 8th.[11]

Service and philanthropy[edit]

After graduating from college, Morehouse taught underprivileged students while working with Teach For America, teaching 7th grade at Intermediate School 90 in Washington Heights, Manhattan while he coached the fencing team at his alma mater, Riverdale Country School. He has worked at the organization's offices in New York City while he trained for the Olympics.

After the 2008 Olympics, Morehouse worked to promote the sport of fencing and established programs to attract new participants to the sport. As a motivational speaker, Morehouse spoke to over 15,000 children and young people in urban schools about his Olympic story. He has also given presentations to Fortune 100 and 500 organizations. One of the highlights of his career took place in 2009 when he taught President Obama to fence on the White House lawn in support of Chicago’s bid to host the 2016 Summer Olympics. He has appeared on the Today Show and Happy Hour on Fox Business. In 2008, he was one of the featured athletes on the Emmy Award-winning television documentary, “My First Time: Competing at the Olympics.” Morehouse was inducted into Brandeis Athletics Hall of Fame in 2009,[12] and was the youngest recipient of Brandeis University's Alumni Achievement Award in 2010[13] for his achievements as an athlete and his work with Teach For America. He was named by Fast Company as one of the most influential alumni of Teach For America.[14]

A producer of fencing events and fundraisers, Morehouse founded and produced the Fencing Masters Tournament, the largest spectator fencing competition in the U.S. He supports various non-profits and is an Athlete Ambassador for Right to Play, an organization working with volunteers and partners to use sport and play to enhance child development in areas of disadvantage. In 2011, Morehouse founded the Fencing-in-the-Schools foundation – a non-profit program dedicated to bringing the sport of fencing to under-served communities throughout the country.

He is the author of the book, American Fencer: Modern Lessons from an Ancient Sport (2012), in which he shares experiences as an Olympic athlete and teacher.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Elfman, Lois. "Our Olympic Moment: Tim Morehouse Heads To London", Chutzpah, July 25, 2012. Accessed July 26, 2012. ""Much of his sense of determination is inspired by his Jewish heritage. His maternal grandmother and two of her sisters escaped from Germany in the mid-1930s.... “My middle name, Frank, is the last name of my Jewish heritage. My sense of being Jewish comes from my awareness of my grandmother’s courage and determination to live in the face of enormous difficulties.” ... He will also continue training because he plans to compete in the Maccabiah Games in Israel in 2013."
  2. ^ http://juegospanamericanos2011.inder.cu/Atletas/Ficha.aspx?IDAtleta=3640
  3. ^ Tim Morehouse, USA Fencing. Accessed July 23, 2012.
  4. ^ a b c Wolfer, Sondra. "Olympic fencer Tim Morehouse takes his stab at being the best", New York Daily News, July 21, 2008. Accessed August 5, 2008.
  5. ^ a b Timothy Morehouse, USA Fencing. Accessed August 5, 2008.
  6. ^ Home page, Tim Morehouse. Accessed September 18, 2008.
  7. ^ [1]
  8. ^ [2]
  9. ^ Mordkoff, David via Associated Press. "Fencer Smart likes USA's prospects at Athens", USA Today, April 26, 2004. Accessed August 5, 2008.
  10. ^ Associated Press. "US Men's Saber Team Faces Top-Seeded Russia at Olympics in Chase for 1st Fencing Medal", The Washington Post, August 2, 2012. Accessed August 11, 2012.
  11. ^ "US Mens Saber Team Ends Olympic Games in Eighth Place", August 3, 2012. Accessed August 11, 2012.
  12. ^ "Tim Morehouse - Brandeis Athletics"
  13. ^ "Olympian, Activist Win Alumni Achievement Awards". Brandeis Magazine Alumni News. Fall 2010. Retrieved 10 April 2012. 
  14. ^ St. John, Jeninne Lee.“Teach for America’s Most Influential Alumni”,”Fast Company magazine”, Dec 28, 2010. Accessed April 10, 2012.

External links[edit]

  • [3] Tim Morehouse website
  • [4] Fencing Masters website