Tim Valentine

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Tim Valentine
Tim Valentine.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from North Carolina's 2nd district
In office
January 3, 1983 – January 3, 1995
Preceded by Lawrence H. Fountain
Succeeded by David Funderburk
Personal details
Born (1926-03-15) March 15, 1926 (age 88)
Rocky Mount, North Carolina
Political party Democratic
Religion Baptist

Itimous Thaddeus Valentine, Jr. (born March 15, 1926), generally known as Tim Valentine, was a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives from North Carolina from 1983 to 1995.

Valentine was born in Rocky Mount, North Carolina and attended public schools. During World War II he joined the U.S. Army Air Corps (now the United States Air Force) and served on active duty from 1944 to 1946. He graduated from The Citadel in Charleston, South Carolina in 1948, and graduated from the law school of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1952, being admitted to the North Carolina bar that same year.

Valentine served in the North Carolina House of Representatives from 1955 to 1960. Thereafter, he was an advisor and counsel to Governor Dan K. Moore and later chaired the executive committee of the North Carolina Democratic Party (1966–1968). He was a delegate to the 1968 Democratic National Convention. In 1982 he was elected to Congress from North Carolina's 2nd congressional district and served six terms in the House of Representatives. He did not stand for re-election in 1994 and retired from elected office when his term expired in January 1995.

One of Valentine's sons, Phil Valentine, is a conservative talk show host in Nashville on 99.7 WWTN.

Notes[edit]

Valentine has sons Steve, Mark and Phil. Beth Valentine Dollar is his only daughter. He is married to Barbara Valentine. They have nine grandchildren.

References[edit]

External links[edit]

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Lawrence H. Fountain
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from North Carolina's 2nd congressional district

1983–1995
Succeeded by
David Funderburk