Tim Wilson (comedian)

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Tim Wilson
Birth name Timothy Collins Wilson
Born (1961-08-05)August 5, 1961
Columbus, Georgia, U.S.
Died February 26, 2014(2014-02-26) (aged 52)
Columbus, Georgia, U.S.
Genres Country, comedy, parody
Occupations Singer-songwriter, comedian
Instruments Vocals, acoustic guitar
Years active 1994–2014
Labels Southern Tracks, Capitol Nashville
Associated acts Jeff Foxworthy, Toby Keith, Pinkard & Bowden, Billy Gardell

Timothy Collins "Tim" Wilson (August 5, 1961 – February 26, 2014) was an American stand-up comedian and country music artist, whose act combined stand-up comedy and original songs.[1]

He released more than a dozen comedy albums, including several for Capitol Records Nashville, and made frequent appearances on the John Boy and Billy, Big D and Bubba and Bob and Tom Show. Wilson also appeared on numerous television programs, including The Tonight Show with Jay Leno and American Revolution Country Comedy on CMT. In 2011, Wilson appeared on CMT's Ron White's Comedy Salute to the Troops.

In 2012, Wilson appeared on the Showtime comedy special, Billy Gardell's: Road Dogs, with Gardell hosting along with comedians Ben Creed and Kenny Rogerson.[2] Wilson produced the show's musical theme, "Back Home To You" by guitarist Scotty Bratcher.[citation needed]

Life and career[edit]

Wilson was born August 5, 1961, in Columbus, Georgia, and attended Presbyterian College in Clinton, South Carolina, as an English major.[3] His parents were school teachers. He was a self-described libertarian, and sometimes included his political standpoints in his comedy routines.[4] He co-wrote comedian Jeff Foxworthy's 1996 single "Redneck 12 Days of Christmas", as well as several parodies for the 1980s comedy duo Pinkard & Bowden.[1]

Wilson began his recording career in Atlanta, on the Southern Tracks label with music publisher Bill Lowery. Members of the Atlanta Rhythm Section played on many of Wilson's early recordings, with ARS keyboardist Dean Daughtry producing.[1] Wilson later recorded extensively in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, with the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section. He co-produced Allnight Allstars with Muscle Shoals engineer Steve Melton. The project appeared on Capitol Nashville and includes Levon Helm, Greg Allman, Jimmy Hall, Bobby Whitlock, and members of both the Atlanta Rhythm Section and the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section.[5]

In 2009, Wilson and Roger Keiss wrote a detective book entitled Happy New Year — ted, about serial killer Ted Bundy.[6] He can be heard discussing his research and his book in great detail while visiting the Off The Air Podcast, hosted by Chick McGee of the Bob and Tom Show.

Death[edit]

Wilson died of a heart attack on February 26, 2014. Early reports stated that he died in Nashville, Tennessee; however, his longtime friend and manager Chris Dipetta clarified that he had been traveling, but had made it to his hometown of Columbus, Georgia, before he died.[7] More details from the referenced story state: "Wilson, 52, drove to Columbus from a gig in Michigan to visit his brother en route to a weekend show in Birmingham, Ala. when he started feeling ill, said Dipetta, who worked with Wilson for 30 years. Dipetta continued, "I talked to him yesterday afternoon and he said he felt bad, was short of breath, and I said, "get to the hospital now!" His brother took him to the hospital and he had a massive heart attack and passed away at 9:15 p.m." Wilson left behind his wife and two children.[8][9]

Tribute show[edit]

On May 9, 2014, The Bob and Tom show sponsored a tribute comedy show to honor Tim and help provide an education for his son.[10] This three and a half hour show was presented at the Paramount Theatre (Anderson, Indiana). The announced lineup included the Bob and Tom show personalities (Bob Kevoian, Tom Griswold, Kristi Lee, and Chick McGee); Dr. Gonzo; Heywood Banks; Drew Hastings; and Donny Baker. Surprise guests were introduced during the show and included, Duke Tumatoe; Indianapolis Colts punter, Pat McAfee; Rickey Rydell and Scotty Bratcher. Additional music talent was provided by Steve Allee, keyboard and PJ Yinger, trumpet. Bob Kevoian did a solo performance of a Tim Wilson tribute song on ukelele which left few dry eyes in the audience.

Discography[edit]

Albums[edit]

Title Album details[11] Peak chart positions
US Country US Comedy US Heat
Waking Up the Neighborhood
  • Release date: July 26, 1994
  • Label: Southern Tracks
Tough Crowd
  • Release date: July 15, 1995
  • Label: Southern Tracks
Low-Class Love Affair
  • Release date: September 18, 1995
  • Label: Southern Tracks
Tuned Up
  • Release date: May 6, 1997
  • Label: Southern Tracks
It's a Sorry World 44 31
Road Comedy 101
  • Release date: February 16, 1999
  • Label: Southern Tracks
Gettin' My Mind Right
  • Release date: October 5, 1999
  • Label: Capitol Nashville
28 28
Hillbilly Homeboy
  • Release date: June 6, 2000
  • Label: Capitol Nashville
48
I Should've Married My Father-In-Law
  • Release date: October 23, 2001
  • Label: Capitol Nashville
64
Super Bad Sounds of the 70's
  • Release date: May 20, 2003
  • Label: Capitol Nashville
57
The Real Twang Thang
  • Release date: January 25, 2005
  • Label: Capitol Nashville
11
Church League Softball Fistfight
  • Release date: November 22, 2005
  • Label: Capitol Nashville
12
But I Could Be Wrong
  • Release date: March 20, 2007
  • Label: Capitol Nashville
61 4 42
Mr. Wilson Explains America
  • Release date: October 20, 2009
  • Label: Capitol Nashville
13
Caffeine Wired, Nervous & Pale
  • Release date: June 11, 2013[12]
  • Label: Capitol Nashville
"—" denotes releases that did not chart

Compilation albums[edit]

Title Album details Peak positions
US Country
Songs for the Musically Disturbed:
His (Almost) Greatest Hits
  • Release date: November 26, 1996
  • Label: Southern Tracks
Certified Aluminum: His Greatest
Recycled Hits, Volume 1
  • Release date: August 13, 2002
  • Label: Capitol Nashville
62
"—" denotes releases that did not chart

Singles[edit]

Year Single Peak positions Album
US Country
1993 "Garth Brooks Has Ruined My Life" 70 Tough Crowd
2000 "The Ballad of John Rocker" 66 Hillbilly Homeboy
2002 "The Jeff Gordon Song" Certified Aluminum
2003 "Booty Man" Super Bad Sounds of the 70's
"—" denotes releases that did not chart

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Ankeny, Jason. "Tim Wilson biography". Allmusic. Retrieved 2008-06-12. 
  2. ^ "Kenny Rogerson"
  3. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2008). Hot Country Songs 1944 to 2008. Record Research, Inc. p. 472. ISBN 0-89820-177-2. 
  4. ^ "Tim Wilson - Libertarian". TheAdvocates.org. Archived from the original on 2008-04-23. Retrieved 2008-06-12. 
  5. ^ "ALL NIGHT ALL STARS". Archived from the original on March 9, 2012. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  6. ^ Kinslow, Gina (2009-08-06). "Comedian Tim Wilson to perform at Plaza Saturday". Glasgow Daily Times. Retrieved 2009-09-22. 
  7. ^ Fernandez, Maria Elena (Feb 27, 2014). "Comedic country singer Tim Wilson dies at 52". NBC News. Today. Retrieved 26 August 2014. 
  8. ^ http://www.mlive.com/entertainment/bay-city/index.ssf/2014/02/bob_tom_show_comedian_tim_wils.html
  9. ^ Stallings, Amy (February 27, 2014).Report: Comedian Tim Wilson dies after suffering heart attack whas11.com; retrieved February 27, 2014.
  10. ^ "Join us for the Tim Wilson Benefit Show". bobandtom.com. 21 April 2014. Retrieved 10 May 2014. 
  11. ^ http://www.billboard.com/artist/429955/tim+wilson/chart?f=315
  12. ^ https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/caffeine-wired-nervous-pale/id656707522

External links[edit]