Timeline of Grozny

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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Grozny, Chechen Republic, Russia.

19th century[edit]

  • 1876 - Population: 6,000 (approximate).[2][3]
  • 1893 - Oil discovered in Grozny area.[2]
  • 1897 - Population: 15,599.[4]

20th century[edit]

  • 1900 - Synagogue opens.[5]
  • 1913 - Population: 34,000.[2]
  • 1926 - Population: 97,000.[2]
  • 1932 - Electric tramway begins operating.
  • 1936 - Chechen-Ingush Philharmonic Society active.[2]
  • 1937 - Grozny Music College opens.[2]
  • 1939 - Population: 175,000.[2]
  • 1973 - January: Ingush demonstrations at Lenin Square.[6]
  • 1989 - Population: 397,000.[2]
  • 1997
    • City renamed "Dzokhar-Ghala."[9]
    • June: Mayoral election declared invalid.[14]

21st century[edit]

  • 2006 - Population: 240,000 (estimate).[22]
  • 2007 - Muslim Khuchiyev becomes mayor.
  • 2012
    • Islam Kadyrov becomes mayor.[28]
    • Lermontov Drama Theatre rebuilt.[29]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Élisée Reclus (1876), The Earth and its Inhabitants, Edited by A.H. Keane, London: Virtue & Co. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Amjad Jaimoukha (2005), The Chechens: a Handbook, Routledge, ISBN 9780415323284 
  3. ^ "Groznaya", Hand-book for Travellers in Russia, Poland, and Finland (4th ed.), London: J. Murray, 1888 
  4. ^ "Groznyi", Encyclopaedia Britannica (11th ed.), New York: Encyclopaedia Britannica Co., 1910, OCLC 14782424 
  5. ^ "Grozny". Jewish Virtual Library. Retrieved 21 April 2013. 
  6. ^ Russia, the Ingush-Ossetian Conflict in the Prigorodnyi Region. Human Rights Watch. 1996. ISBN 1564321657. 
  7. ^ a b Kimberly Zisk Marten (2012), Warlords: Strong-arm Brokers in Weak States, Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, ISBN 9780801450761 
  8. ^ Monica Duffy Toft (2003), The Geography of Ethnic Violence, Princeton University Press, ISBN 9780691113548 
  9. ^ a b Carlotta Gall; Thomas de Waal (1998), Chechnya: calamity in the Caucasus, New York: New York University Press, ISBN 0814729630 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h Ian Jeffries (2002), The New Russia: a Handbook of Economic and Political Developments, RoutledgeCurzon, ISBN 9780700716210 
  11. ^ Bogdan Szajkowski (1995). "Chechnia: The Empire Strikes Back". GeoJournal 37. 
  12. ^ a b c d "Chechnya Profile: Timeline". BBC News. Retrieved 21 April 2013. 
  13. ^ Julie Wilhelmsen (2005). "Between a Rock and a Hard Place: The Islamisation of the Chechen Separatist Movement". Europe-Asia Studies 57. 
  14. ^ "Grozny Elections Declared Invalid". Moscow Times. 3 June 1997. Retrieved 21 April 2013. 
  15. ^ "Chechen rebels told to surrender". BBC News. 2 February 2000. Retrieved 21 April 2013. 
  16. ^ "Chechen Rebels Report Loss of 3 Commanders". Los Angeles Times. 2 February 2000. Retrieved 21 April 2013. 
  17. ^ "'Nothing Is Left' in Grozny, Returning Refugees Discover". New York Times. 12 February 2000. Retrieved 21 April 2013. 
  18. ^ "Russians Order Grozny Residents To Leave, Sealing Off Ruined City". New York Times. 15 February 2000. Retrieved 21 April 2013. 
  19. ^ "Grozneftegaz". Rosneft. Retrieved 21 April 2013. 
  20. ^ Paul J. Murphy (2010), Allah's angels: Chechen women in war, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, ISBN 9781591145424 
  21. ^ "Chechnya Bomb Kills President, a Blow to Putin". New York Times. 10 May 2004. Retrieved 21 April 2013. 
  22. ^ C.J. Chivers (3 May 2006). "Spring rebuilding in Chechnya". New York Times. Retrieved 21 April 2013. 
  23. ^ Alexei V. Malashenko; Aziza Nuritova (2009). "Islam in Russia". Social Research 76. 
  24. ^ "A Chechen avenue is named for Putin". New York Times. 6 October 2008. Retrieved 21 April 2013. 
  25. ^ "The Wild South: Russia’s treatment of its republics in the Caucasus has turned them into tinderboxes". The Economist. London. 27 November 2008. Retrieved 21 April 2013. 
  26. ^ "Population of capital cities and cities of 100,000 or more inhabitants". Demographic Yearbook 2011. United Nations Statistics Division. 2012. Retrieved 21 April 2013. 
  27. ^ Seth Mydans (5 October 2011). "Gleaming City Rising From Ruins Can’t Hide Psychic Scars of a War". New York Times. Retrieved 21 April 2013. 
  28. ^ Territories of the Russian Federation 2013. Routledge. 2013. ISBN 185743675X. 
  29. ^ "Chechen drama theatre starts new season". Voice of Russia. 21 March 2012. Retrieved 21 April 2013. 
  30. ^ "Chechnya skyscraper on fire". The Guardian. UK. 4 April 2013. Retrieved 21 April 2013. 

This article incorporates information from the Russian Wikipedia.

Further reading[edit]

Published in the 20th century
  • "Grosnyi". Brockhaus' Konversations-Lexikon (in German) (14th ed.). Leipzig: Brockhaus. 1908. 
Published in the 21st century
  • I. Demchenko (2013). "The Illusion of Peace: The Reconstruction of Grozny and the New Chechen Identity". In Sarah Moser. New Cities in the Muslim World. London: Reaktion. ISBN 978-94-007-4684-8. 

External links[edit]