Timeline of Havana

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The following is a timeline of the history of Havana, Cuba.

16th century[edit]

17th century[edit]

18th century[edit]

Map of Havana, 1739

19th century[edit]

  • 1810 - Hurricane.[1]
  • 1811 - Population: 94,023.[1]
  • 1813 - El Lucero de la Habana newspaper begins publication.
  • 1817 - Botanical Gardens established.[5]
  • 1828 - El Templete chapel built in the Plaza de Armas.[1]
  • 1832 - El Noticioso y Lucero de la Habana newspaper begins publication.
  • 1834 - President's Palace built.[2]
  • 1835 - Fernando VII aqueduct constructed.[1]
  • 1837 - Railway (Havana-Bejucal), Mercado de Cristina, and city jail[1] constructed.
  • 1838 - Great Theatre of Havana opens.
  • 1846 - Great Havana Hurricane.
  • 1854 - Colegio de Belén opens.[citation needed]
  • 1856 - Hotel Inglaterra built.[5]
  • 1860 - Royal Academy of Medical, Physical, and Natural Sciences established.[6]
  • 1863 - City walls dismantled.
  • 1868
  • 1871 - November 27: Students executed.[2]
  • 1876 - Hotel Pasaje built.[8]
  • 1877
    • Villalba palace built.[5]
    • Payret Theatre opens.[9]
  • 1878 - Acueducto de Albear inaugurated.
  • 1881 - Jane Theater-Circus built.[5]
  • 1882 - School of arts and trades opens.[1]
  • 1884 - La Lucha newspaper begins publication.[1]
  • 1888 - La Discusion newspaper begins publication.[1]
  • 1889 - Population: 200,000.[10]
  • 1890 - Alhambra Theatre opens.[11]
  • 1894 - Manzana de Gomez built.[5]
  • 1898 - February 15: United States Navy Ship Maine explosion.
  • 1899 - U.S. military occupation begins.[1]

20th century[edit]

Map of Havana, 1909

21st century[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad "Havana", The Encyclopaedia Britannica (11th ed.), New York: Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1910, OCLC 14782424 
  2. ^ a b c d e "Havana", The United States, with Excursions to Mexico, Cuba, Porto Rico, and Alaska (4th ed.), Leipzig: K. Baedeker, 1909 
  3. ^ a b c John James Clune (2001). "A Cuban Convent in the Age of Enlightened Reform: The Observant Franciscan Community of Santa Clara of Havana, 1768-1808". The Americas 57. 
  4. ^ Jedidiah Morse (1797), "Havannah", The American Gazetteer, Boston: S. Hall, and Thomas & Andrews 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i Jean-François Lejeune, John Beusterien and Narciso G. Menocal (1996). "The City as Landscape: Jean Claude Nicolas Forestier and the Great Urban Works of Havana, 1925-1930". Journal of Decorative and Propaganda Arts 22. 
  6. ^ Pedro M. Pruna (1994). "National Science in a Colonial Context: The Royal Academy of Sciences of Havana, 1861-1898". Isis 85. JSTOR 235461. 
  7. ^ Bankers' Loan and Securities Company, New Orleans (1916), The Republic of Cuba, New Orleans 
  8. ^ Carlos Venegas Fornias, Narciso G. Menocal and Edward Shaw (1996). "Havana between Two Centuries". Journal of Decorative and Propaganda Arts. 
  9. ^ Waldo Jiménez de la Romera (1887), Cuba, Puerto-Rico y Filipinas (in Spanish), Barcelona: D. Cortezo y ca., OCLC 3153821 
  10. ^ Karl August Zehden (1889), Commercial Geography, London: Blacke & Son, Limited 
  11. ^ a b Susan Thomas (2008), Cuban Zarzuela: Performing Race and Gender on Havana's Lyric Stage, University of Illinois Press, ISBN 9780252033315, 0252033310 
  12. ^ Kirwin R. Shaffer (2009). "Havana Hub: Cuban Anarchism, Radical Media and the Trans-Caribbean Anarchist Network, 1902-1915". Caribbean Studies 37. 
  13. ^ Marrion Wilcox; George E. Rines, eds. (1917), Encyclopedia of Latin America, New York: Encyclopedia Americana Corporation, OCLC 603664 
  14. ^ "Mexico and Central America, 1900 A.D.: Key Events". Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art. Retrieved May 2014. 
  15. ^ "Cuban Heritage Collection". University of Miami Libraries. Retrieved January 14, 2013. 

Further reading[edit]

Published in the 19th century
Published in the 20th century
Published in the 21st century

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 23°08′00″N 82°23′00″W / 23.133333°N 82.383333°W / 23.133333; -82.383333