Timeline of Indianapolis

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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.

19th century[edit]

1800s-1840s[edit]

  • 1816
    • U.S. Congress authorizes a state government for Indiana and donates federal land to establish a permanent seat of government for the new state.[1]
  • 1818
  • 1820
    • On January 11 the Indiana General Assembly authorizes a selection committee to choose a permanent site for the new state capital. On June 7 the commissioners select four sections of land along west fork of the White River, on its eastern bank, two miles northwest of the Indiana's geographic center.[3][4]
  • 1821
    • On January 6 the Indiana General Assembly ratifies the site selection on the White River in central Indiana as the permanent state capital of Indiana and names it Indianapolis, the state's new seat of government.[5][6]
    • Alexander Ralston and Elias Pym Fordham are appointed to survey the site selected for the new state capital.[7]
    • The town's first two justices of the peace are appointed on January 9.[8]
    • Several hundred cases of illness and twenty-five fatalities, most of them children, are reported in Indianapolis after heavy rains fall during June, July, and August.[9]
    • The town's first property lots are offered for sale on October 8.[10]
    • Local residents erect the town's first log schoolhouse; however, the town's first permanent school is not established until 1824.[11]
    • A town cemetery is established near the White River. The site is renamed Greenlawn Cemetery in 1862.[12]
    • Marion County, Indiana, is established on December 31, 1821, with Indianapolis named as the county’s seat of government.[13]
  • 1822
    • Indianapolis Gazette, the city's first newspaper, begins publication.[14][15]
    • Indianapolis's first postmaster is appointed.[16]
    • The first election of Marion County government officials is held.[17]
    • The state legislature appropriates funds to build state roads to Indianapolis, while the Marion County government begins construction of county roads.[18]
    • The first session of the Fifth Judicial Circuit Court in Marion County is held in a local resident's log home.[19]
    • A militia is organized in central Indiana.[20]
    • The town's first jail is built.[21]
    • Methodists organize their first Indianapolis congregation. Its first church, erected in 1829, is replaced with Wesley Chapel in 1846. Meridian Street Methodist Episcopal Church is dedicated in 1871. The congregation merges with the Fifty-first Street Methodist Church in 1945, and the combined congregation erects Meridian Street Methodist Church, which opens in 1952.[22]
    • Baptists organize the First Baptist Church congregation in Indianapolis on October 10. The congregation first meets in a log schoolhouse. The First Baptist Church is completed in 1831.[23][24][25]
  • 1823
    • The Western Censor and Emigrant's Guide begins publication. Its name is changed to the Indiana Journal in 1825. The Journal becomes a permanent daily newspaper in 1853, and merges with The Indianapolis Star on June 8, 1904.[26]
    • The Indiana Central Medical Society is formed to license physicians to practice medicine.[27][28]
    • The town's first theatrical performance takes place at a local tavern.[29]
    • Presbyterians establish Indianapolis’s First Presbyterian Church congregation on July 23. Its first church is completed in 1824. The congregation merges with the Meridian Highlands Presbyterian Church in 1970, establishing the First-Meridian Highland Church congregation.[30][31][32][33]
    • The Indianapolis Sabbath School Union is established.[34]
  • 1824
    • Marion County courthouse is completed; it also houses the Indiana General Assembly until a new Indiana Statehouse is completed in 1835.[15]
    • The town's first training school for militia officers and soldiers is established.[35]
    • A series of severe spring storms flood waterways and set high water marks for Indianapolis.[36]
  • 1825
    • Indiana's state government relocates to Indianapolis from Corydon, Indiana, effective January 1.[15]
    • Indiana State Library is established.[37]
    • Indianapolis Journal newspaper begins publication.[14]
    • The first Marion County courthouse is completed in January.[38]
    • The first session of the state legislature in Indianapolis begins in January at the newly completed county courthouse.[39]
    • The Indiana State Library is founded.[40]
    • The Marion County Agricultural Society is organized.[41]
  • 1826
  • 1827
  • 1828
    • The town's first cavalry company is organized.[46]
    • The Indianapolis Steam Mill Company, the town's first incorporated business, builds a new mill along the White River. The mill is completed in 1831, but it proves unprofitable and closes in 1835.[47]
    • The Marion County Temperance Society is formed.[48]
  • 1829
    • Indiana Colonization Society is formed.[49]
  • 1830 – Indiana population estimate: 1,900.[50]
    • Indiana Historical Society is organized on December 11. Benjamin Parke serves as its first president.[51][52]
    • The Indiana Democrat begins publication and consolidates operations with the Gazette. The Democrat becomes the Indiana State Sentinel in 1841. The Sentinel becomes the town's first permanent daily newspaper in 1851; it is discontinued in 1906.[26]
    • The Indianapolis Female School, the town's first school for young women, opens in March.[53]
  • 1831
    • Town officials appoint Indianapolis's first board of health when the town experiences its first case of small pox.[51]
    • The steamboat Robert Hanna arrives in town on April 11. After it departs from Indianapolis the boat runs aground along the White River; no steamboat successfully returns to the capital city.[54]
  • 1832
    • The town is incorporated and local government is placed under the direction of five elected trustees.[55]
    • The first election for town officials is held in September. Samuel Henderson serves as first president of the town's board of trustees.[56]
    • The state legislature authorizes the establishment of the Marion County Seminary, which opens in 1834.[57][58]
    • The town's first foundry is established; it begins operations in 1833.[59]
  • 1833
    • The town's first market house is built. The structure becomes known as the Indianapolis City Market.[51][60]
    • The town's first Church of Christ congregation is organized. Its first church building is erected in 1837. Christian Chapel, completed in 1852, is renamed Central Christian Church in 1879.[61]
  • 1834
    • The town's first brewery is established.[62]
    • The State Bank of Indiana is chartered and establishes its main office and one of its first sixteen branch locations in Indianapolis.[58]
  • 1835
    • Construction of a Greek Revival-style Indiana Statehouse is completed.[63]
    • The Indiana State Board of Agriculture is established in February.[64]
    • The Marion County Board of Agriculture is formed in June. The first Marion County fair is held on October 30–31.[64]
    • The Indianapolis Benevolent Society is established in November.[65]
    • The town purchases its first hand engine for its volunteer firefighters.[66]
  • 1836
  • 1837
    • The National Road arrives in Indianapolis.[73]
    • Indianapolis Female Institute opens.[74]
    • Marion Guards become Indianapolis's first militia company.[75]
    • The town erects a new firehouse on the north side of the Circle.[62]
    • The First English Lutheran Church congregation (also known as Mount Pisgah Evangelical Lutheran Church) is organized. Its first church is erected in 1838.[76]
    • Holy Cross, the city’s oldest Catholic parish, is formed in November. The Chapel of the Holy Cross, the parish’s first church, is completed in 1840. Its second church, completed in 1850, is named Saint John the Evangelist Catholic Church. It is replaced with Saint John’s Cathedral in 1871.[61][77]
    • The town's Episcopalian congregation organizes and begins construction of its first Christ Church on the Circle. Christ Church Cathedral, completed in 1859, replaces the earlier church and is built on the same site.[78]
  • 1838
    • Indianapolis reincorporates with a new charter and a new town council formation.[79]
    • The city's Second Presbyterian Church congregation organizes on November 19. Its first church building is dedicated in 1840.[80]
  • 1839
    • The state's bankruptcy halts Central Canal construction after nine miles are opened for traffic.[50]
    • The Indiana General Assembly appropriates funds to purchase a home at Illinois and Meridian streets to serve as the official governor's residence. It is sold in 1865 and later demolished.[81]
  • 1840 - Indianapolis population: 2,692.[50]
  • 1841
    • Zion's Church, the city's first German-speaking Evangelical congregation, is organized on April 18. Its first church is dedicated in 1845. The church is renamed Zion Evangelical United Church of Christ in 1957, when it merges with other congregations.[61]
  • 1842
    • Indianapolis's Methodists divide into two congregations. One group remains at the Methodist church on the Circle; the other establishes Roberts Chapel in 1843.[82]
  • 1843
    • Roberts Chapel becomes the city's eastside Methodist congregation. Its first church is dedicated in 1846. The congregation dedicates its new church, named Robert Park Methodist Episcopal Church, in 1876.[61]
  • 1844
    • The state government assumes responsibility for William Willard's private school for the deaf, established in 1843,[50][74] and renames it the Indiana State Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb. Construction of its new facility in Indianapolis is completed in 1850.[83][84]
    • Saint Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church, a German Lutheran congregation, is organized. Its first church is dedicated in 1845.[85]
    • The town's first Universalist Church Society is organized, but it exists only briefly.[86]
    • The Indiana Freeman, an antislavery newspaper, appears in November.[87]
    • The Marion County Library is established in the basement of the county courthouse.[88][89]
  • 1845
    • The city's first Methodist congregation is divided a second time to create a western congregation, whose first church is known as Strange Chapel. The congregation erects Saint John's Methodist Episcopal Church in 1871.[90]
  • 1846
    • The Second Baptist Church congregation is organized. Its first church is built in 1849.[91][92]
  • 1847
    • Heavy rains from December 1846 cause record flooding in January, the city's most significant flood since 1824. In November 1847 a flood nearly equal to the one in January damages property in Indianapolis and West Indianapolis, the National Road, and the Indiana Central Canal.[93][94]** Indianapolis voters approve a new charter to make Indianapolis an incorporated city effective March 30.[50]
    • Samuel Henderson is elected the city's first mayor on April 24.[50][95]
    • Indianapolis voters approve a charter to make Indianapolis an incorporated city effective March 30.[50]
    • City voters approve taxes to establish free public schools.[96]
    • The Locomotive begins publication on August 16. It discontinues operations in 1861 and consolidates with the Sentinel.[97]
    • The Indiana Institute for the Education of the Blind opens in October. Construction of the main building on its a new site is completed in 1853. It is demolished in 1909 to make space for a new facility.[74][98]
    • Construction is completed on the main building of the Indiana Hospital for the Insane.[74][99]
    • Madison and Indianapolis Railroad, the first steam railroad in Indiana, begins operations and arrives in Indianapolis on October 1.[50]
  • 1848
    • The Indianapolis Union Railway Company is organized to erect a connecting line between railroads serving Indianapolis. The company begins laying track in 1850.[100][101]
    • The Central Plank Road Company is chartered to construct plank roads connecting Indianapolis to nearby towns.[100]
    • The city's first telegraph lines link Indianapolis to Dayton, Ohio.[102]
    • The Indiana Volksblatt, the city's first German-language newspaper, begins publication in September.[14][50] It is discontinued in 1907.[103][104]
    • Indianapolis and Bellefontaine Railroad in operation.[citation needed]
    • Free Soil Banner begins publication.[105]
    • The Indiana Central Medical College is organized on November 1.[106]
    • Another small pox scare alarms city residents.[107]
  • 1849
    • The First German Methodist Episcopal Church congregation organizes. Its first church is built in 1850.[90][108]

1850s-1890s[edit]

  • 1850 – Indianapolis population: 8,091[109]
    • Construction on the Grand Lodge of the Free Masons, the city's first public hall, is completed.[110]
    • North Western Christian University, renamed Butler University in 1877, receives its charter from the state legislature. The university opens for classes in 1855. The school relocates to Irvington in 1875–76, and moves to a new location, known as Fairview Park, in 1928.[111][112][113]
    • The city's first United Brethren in Christ congregation is organized. Its first church opens in 1851.[114]
    • Indianapolis Business University is established.[37]
    • Union Track Railway Company is organized in May.[citation needed]
  • 1851
    • Indianapolis's first gasworks is completed.[115]
    • Indianapolis Gas Light and Coke Company is chartered by the state legislature in March. The company begins supplying city residents with natural gas for lighting in 1852.[116][117]
    • The Indianapolis Turngemeinde, the first of the city's German clubs and cultural societies, is established on July 28. It merges with other German clubs and becomes known as the Indianapolis Social Turnverein, or Turners.[118][119]
    • The Indiana Female College, established by the city's Methodists, receives its charter from the state legislature.[120]
    • The Indianapolis Widows and Orphans Friends' Society, predecessor to the Children's Bureau of Indianapolis, is incorporated. The Society erects the first Indianapolis Widows' and Orphans' Asylum in 1855. It is renamed the Indianapolis Orphans' Asylum in 1875. The orphanage is closed in 1941.[121][122]
  • 1852
    • The City Guards militia is organized.[123]
    • The Center Township Library opens in the Center Township Trustee's office.[124]
    • The McLean Female Seminary, a boarding and day school for girls, is established. In 1865 its facility is sold to the Indiana Female Seminary.[125][126]
    • The first Indiana State Fair is held on October 19–25, on the grounds of what becomes known as Military Park, west of downtown Indianapolis.[102][109]
    • Indiana and Illinois Central Railway Company is established.[127]
    • The First German Reformed Church of Indianapolis congregation is organized. Their first church is dedicated on June 24.[128]
  • 1853
    • The Mechanic Rifles militia is organized.[123]
    • Indianapolis's first Union depot, the first of its kind in the United States to serve competing railroad lines, opens on September 28.[129][130] It is demolished in 1887 to make space for the Indianapolis Union Station, a new passenger depot that is completed in 1888.[131]
    • Indianapolis and Cincinnati Railroad in operation.[citation needed]
    • Indianapolis Union Railway in operation.[citation needed]
    • Voters approve a new city charter that provides for an elected mayor and a fourteen-member city council.[79]
    • Freie Presse von Indiana, a weekly German-language newspaper, begins publication in Indianapolis.[132]
    • The city's free public schools establish operations under a common school system and open for enrollment. The city's first free public high school opens in the old Marion County Seminary;[133] however, it closes in 1858, when the Supreme Court of Indiana declares the local school tax unconstitutional.[134]
    • The first Bates House hotel opens for business.[135] It is replaced at the turn of the century.[136]
    • A new Universalist church congregation is organized in the city. The congregation’s First Universalist Church is erected in 1860.[86][137][138]
    • Construction begins on Odd Fellows Hall.[74][139] It is completed in 1855.[120]
  • 1854
  • 1855
  • 1856
    • The Indiana Republican Party holds its first state convention in Indianapolis.[109]
    • The Indianapolis National Guards organize.[123]
    • A Hebrew cemetery is established on three acres, three miles south of the city’s center.[146]
    • The Indianapolis Hebrew Congregation organizes on November 2. The congregation's East Market Street temple is dedicated in 1868. Its Meridian Street temple is dedicated in 1958.[146][147][148]
    • Saint Marienkirche, the city's first German-language Catholic parish, is established. Its first church and school open in 1858.[149]
  • 1857
    • The Metropolitan Theater, the first in the city to be built for that purpose, is completed. The theater opens in 1858 and is later renovated and renamed the Park.[150]
    • The City Grays militia is organized.[123]
    • Plymouth Congregational Church, the city's first Congregational Church, is organized. Its church is dedicated in 1871. The congregation merges with North Congregational Church in 1906 and Mayflower Congregational Church in 1908. The consolidated congregation is renamed the First Congregational Church.[151][152]
  • 1858
    • The Indianapolis Female Institute, a Baptist-affiliated boarding school and day school for girls, is established. It opens for classes in 1859 and closes in 1872.[153][154]
    • After the Supreme Court of Indiana declares a local school tax is unconstitutional, the city's public schools struggle for funding and suspend operations until 1861.[155][156]
  • 1859
  • 1860 – Indianapolis population: 18,611[109]
    • A rapidly moving tornado passes through southeast Indianapolis on May 29; however, the most significant destruction occurs east and west of the city.[163]
    • The city's Independent Zouaves and Zouave Guards militia are organized.[123][159]
    • A new location for the state fairgrounds is established on approximately thirty-eight acres along Alabama Street, north of the city.[164]
  • 1861
    • On February 12 Abraham Lincoln makes a stop in Indianapolis en route to Washington, D.C. to be sworn in as the sixteenth president of the United States.[165]
    • The Indianapolis National Guards, City Grays, Independent Zouaves, Zouave Guards, and one additional group from Indianapolis are assigned to the Eleventh Regiment during the Civil War.[166]
    • Camp Morton is set up as a mustering ground for Union troops on the state fairgrounds at Alabama Street. The camp's first soldiers arrive on April 17.[167]
    • A local manufacturer begins production of ammunition near the Indiana Statehouse. The arsenal is relocated about one and a half miles east of downtown Indianapolis.[168]
    • Indianapolis Public Schools, the city's free public school system, reorganizes. Its elementary schools reopen in 1862; however, the city's public high school remains closed until 1864. In December 1867 the school board purchases the former Second Presbyterian Church building on the Circle and uses it as the city's public high school.[96][169]
    • Hebrew Benevolent Society is organized.[170]
  • 1862
    • Camp Morton is converted to a prisoner-of-war camp for Confederate soldiers. The site returns to its original purpose as a fairgrounds after the war.[167]
    • Congress passes legislation to establish a permanent federal arsenal at Indianapolis.[168] Approximately seventy-six acres of land are purchased east of town in 1863. Construction on the facility is completed in 1868.[158]
    • Eighteen acres of land is purchased to establish Saint John Catholic Cemetery, two miles south of the city. It is renamed Holy Cross Cemetery in 1891.[171]
    • Young Men's Literary and Social Union is organized.[170]
    • Indiana State Museum is established.[citation needed]
    • Indianapolis and Madison Railroad is in operation.[citation needed]
  • 1863
    • The Battle of Pogue's Run, a political confrontation at the state's Democratic convention, occurs in May.[172]
    • Kingan Brothers, renamed Kingan and Company in 1875, opens its first packing facility in Indianapolis.[173]
    • The city's first central watch tower and alarm bell, an early fire warning system, is established.[174] The city's first electric fire alarm system is installed in 1868.[175]
    • An Indianapolis Home for Friendless Women is initially built on seven acres of donated land south of the city; however, it is never completed. The home is reestablished closer to the city’s center in 1867.[176]
    • Crown Hill Cemetery is established.[37] The site is dedicated on June 1, 1864.[177]
    • Indianapolis, Rochester and Chicago Railroad in operation.[citation needed]
  • 1864
    • Indianapolis Board of Trade is organized.[74]
    • Indianapolis, Peru and Chicago Railway is in operation.[citation needed]
    • Indianapolis High School, renamed Shortridge High School in 1897, opens in two rooms of a ward (elementary) school.[105][178]
    • The Citizen's Street and Railway Company begins operating the city's first mule-drawn streetcar line from the Union railway depot in June.[179]
    • Saint Peter's Catholic parish is established. Its first church opens in 1865. It is renamed Saint Patrick's parish in 1870 and construction begins on a new church that is completed in 1871. The parish maintains separate parochial schools for boys and girls.[180][181]
  • 1865
    • April 30 - Lincoln funeral train arrives in Indianapolis.[182]
    • The state legislature establishes the Criminal Circuit Court of Marion County in Indianapolis on December 20.[183]
    • The German-language Taglicher Telegraph, a weekly newspaper, and the Spottsvigel, a Sunday edition of the Telegraph, begin publication. The Telegraph becomes the city's first daily German-language newspaper in 1866.[14][184][185][186]
    • Indianapolis and Vincennes Railroad is in operation.[citation needed]
    • Construction begins on a boys' school at Saint John the Evangelist Catholic Church. In 1867 the school opens under the direction of the Brothers of the Sacred Heart. It closes in 1929, and its building is demolished in 1979.[187]
  • 1866
    • Jeffersonville, Madison and Indianapolis Railroad in operation.
    • Citizens Gaslight and Coke Company is established.[188]
    • City Hospital is equipped and staffed to begin treatment of civilian patients.[144]
    • The Allen African Methodist Episcopal Church congregation is organized and occupies its first church building.[189]
    • Saint Paul’s Episcopal Church parish is organized. Its first church building is dedicated in 1869.[78][190]
    • The first Union soldiers' bodies that had been buried elsewhere in the city during the Civil War are reinterred in a tract of land at Crown Hill Cemetery.[191]
    • Indianapolis hosts the first national Grand Army of the Republic encampment in November.[192]
  • 1867
  • 1868
  • 1869
    • Indianapolis, Bloomington and Western Railway is in operation.[citation needed]
    • John H. Holliday founds the Indianapolis News, an evening daily newspaper. Its first issue appears on December 7.[198][199][200]
    • The city establishes its first sewage system.[201]
    • The Waterworks Company of Indianapolis is incorporated.[116]
    • Mayflower Congregational Church, the city's second Congregational Church is organized. Its church is dedicated in 1870. The congregation consolidates with Plymouth Congregational Church in 1908.[202]
    • South Street Baptist Church is organized.[149]
    • The Indiana Medical College is organized.[203]
    • The city's first German Reform Church congregation is organized.[204]
  • 1870 - Indianapolis population: 48,244.[200]
    • The city's first Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) branch is organized.[205]
    • A Lutheran cemetery is established south of the city on ten acres of land.[204]
    • The Society of Friends (Quakers) establishes the Indianapolis Asylum for Friendless Colored Children, the state's only orphanage for African American children.[206]
    • Irvington, an eastside residential suburb, is platted. It is annexed to Indianapolis in 1902.[207][208]
  • 1871
    • The Indianapolis Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) builds a new facility on North Illinois Street; a new building was constructed at the same location in 1887.[74][200]
  • 1872
    • Indianapolis, Delphi and Chicago Railroad in operation.[citation needed]
    • A free public Library is established in the city. Its first library opens in the city's high school in 1873.[209] The library moves to larger quarters in 1875 and in 1880. A new main library opens in 1893. Its first four branches open in 1896. A new main library building is dedicated in 1917.[210][211]
    • Woodruff Place, a new suburban development, is established on October 2. The community is annexed to Indianapolis in 1962.[212][213]
    • Lyman S. Ayres acquires controlling interest in N.R. Smith and Ayres, the successor to the N.R. Smith and Company, Trade Palace. The dry goods store first appears as L. S. Ayres and Company in 1874. By 2006 the final stores in the Ayres department store chain are either sold, converted to Macy's stores, or closed.[214]
  • 1873
    • Indianapolis Sun newspaper begins publication.[14]
    • Indianapolis, Cincinnati and La Fayette Railroad in operation.[citation needed]
    • Saint Joseph, an Irish Catholic parish, is organized on the city's east side. In 1880 the parish builds a new church, while the Sisters of Providence establish its parochial school. A new school building is erected on the parish's property in 1881.[180][215]
  • 1875
    • Indianapolis, Decatur and Springfield Railway in operation.[citation needed]
    • The Church of the Sacred Heart, the city's second German Catholic parish, is established on the city's south side. The parish replaces its original church in 1885 and again in 1894.[216][217]
  • 1876
    • The Indianapolis Benevolent Society is founded. It is reorganized as the Charity Organization Society in 1879.[218][219]
    • Colonel Eli Lilly establishes a pharmaceutical manufactory on Pearl Street that becomes Eli Lilly and Company.[220]
  • 1877
  • 1878
    • Indianapolis's Belt Railroad of Indianapolis| Belt Railroad is completed.[225]
  • 1879
    • Indianapolis Leader begins publication.[225]
    • Woman's Temperance Publishing Association is formed.
    • Boston School of Elocution and Expression is established.[37]
    • Indiana Bee Keepers' Association is formed.[37]
    • Indianapolis and Danville Railroad in operation.[citation needed]
    • Members of the city's German community establish the Independent Turnverein.[226] The group remodels the former Third Presbyterian Church into a meeting hall, which is dedicated in 1885. A new building is erected on an adjacent lot in 1897.[227]
    • The Benjamin D. Bagby and Company begin publishing the Indianapolis Leader in August; it is discontinued in 1890.[228]
  • 1880 – Indianapolis population: 75,056.[225]
    • The English Opera House, a lavishly decorated theater on the Circle, opens on September 27.[105][150]
    • Indianapolis and Evansville Railroad in operation.[citation needed]
    • Indianapolis and Ohio State Line Railway in operation.[citation needed]
    • Chicago and Indianapolis Air Line Railway in operation.[citation needed]
    • Saint Bridget, an Irish Catholic parish, is organized and construction is completed on its church. The parish's parochial school is erected in 1881.[229][230]
  • 1881
  • 1882
    • May Wright Sewall and her husband, Theodore Lovell Sewell, establish the Girls' Classical School. The college preparatory school continues operations until 1907.[233]
  • 1883
    • The Art Association of Indianapolis is founded.[234]
  • 1884
    • The city's German community establishes an industrial training program in the German-English School. The Indianapolis Public Schools establishes its vocational training program at Shortridge High School in 1888.[235]
    • William Hayden English completes the first section of a grand hotel adjacent to the English Opera House. The hotel's second section is added in 1896.[236]
  • 1885
    • Chess Club and Hendricks Club is organized.[37]
  • 1886
  • 1887
  • 1888
    • The Indianapolis Propylaeum, a women's cultural organization, is incorporated on June 6. The group erects a meeting hall in 1889.[239][240]
    • Construction is completed on a Renaissance Revival-style Indiana Statehouse to replace an earlier structure built at the same location.[241]
    • Construction on the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument begins. Its installation is completed in 1902. The monument is dedicated on May 15, 1902.[242]
    • The Sun begins publication on March 12. It is renamed the Indiana Daily Times in 1914.[243]
    • Indianapolis Freeman newspaper begins publication.
    • Indianapolis, Decatur and Western Railway in operation.[citation needed]
  • 1889
  • 1890 – Indianapolis population: 105,436[245]
    • The Commercial Club of Indianapolis is organized. The club becomes the Indianapolis Chamber of Commerce in 1912.[246]
    • The city's first electric-powered streetcar service begins on June 18.[247]
  • 1892
  • 1893
    • Construction begins on the Das Deutsche Haus (The German House), the city's center for German culture.[250] The east wing is completed in 1894. The remainder is completed over the next four years.[227] The finished building is dedicated in 1898, and renamed the Athenæum during World War I.[251]
    • The Southside Turnverein is established.[226] The group dedicates its new Prospect Street facility in 1901.[227]
  • 1894
    • First basketball played in the city at the Illinois Street YMCA.[245]
    • The Church of the Assumption parish is established in west Indianapolis.[249]
  • 1895
  • 1896
    • George P. Stewart and William H. Porter establish the Indianapolis Recorder.[252]
    • William H. Block founds a retail department store on Washington Street.[253] The business is incorporated in 1907. Construction begins on a new eight-story building in 1910.[254]
    • A new Holy Cross Catholic parish is established on Indianapolis's east side, reviving the name of the city’s first Catholic church.[255]
  • 1897
  • 1898
    • The Catholic Diocese of Vincennes is renamed the Catholic Diocese of Indianapolis.[195] It is elevated to the Archdiocese of Indianapolis in 1944.[256]
  • 1899

20th century[edit]

1900s-1940s[edit]

1950s-1990s[edit]

21st century[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ A. C. Howard (1857). A. C. Howard’s Directory for the City of Indianapolis: Containing a Correct List of Citizens’ Names, Their Residence and Place of Business, with a Historical Sketch of Indianapolis from its Earliest History to the Present Day. Indianapolis: A. C. Howard. p. 3. 
  2. ^ Howard, p. 2.
  3. ^ M. Teresa Baer (2012). Indianapolis: A City of Immigrants. Indianapolis: Indiana Historical Society. p. 56. ISBN 978-0-87195-299-8. 
  4. ^ Howard, p. 1.
  5. ^ Howard, p. 4.
  6. ^ Jacob Piatt Dunn (1910). Greater Indianapolis: The History, the Industries, the Institutions, and the People of a City of Homes I. Chicago: The Lewis Publishing Company. p. 26. 
  7. ^ William A. Browne Jr. (Summer 2013). "The Ralston Plan: Naming the Streets of Indianapolis". Traces of Indiana and Midwestern History (Indianapolis, Ind.: Indiana Historical Society) 25 (3): 8. 
  8. ^ Ignatius Brown (1868). Logan’s History of Indianapolis from 1818. Indianapolis: Logan and Company. p. 4. 
  9. ^ Berry R. Sulgrove (1884). History of Indianapolis and Marion County Indiana. Philadelphia: L. H. Everts and Company. p. 30. 
  10. ^ Dunn, Greater Indianapolis, p. 31–32.
  11. ^ Dunn, Greater Indianapolis, p. 90–91.
  12. ^ Doublas A. Wissing (2013). Crown Hill: History, Spirit, and Sanctuary. Indianapolis: Indiana Historical Society Press. p. 2. ISBN 9780871953018. 
  13. ^ David J. Bodenhamer and Robert G. Barrows, eds. (1994). The Encyclopedia of Indianapolis. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press. p. 1479. ISBN 0-253-31222-1. 
  14. ^ a b c d e f "US Newspaper Directory". Chronicling America. Washington DC: Library of Congress. Retrieved October 7, 2012. 
  15. ^ a b c Howard, p. 15.
  16. ^ Howard, p. 13.
  17. ^ Howard, p. 14.
  18. ^ Max R. Hyman, ed. (1902). The Journal Handbook of Indianapolis: An Outline History. Indianapolis, Ind.: The Indianapolis Journal Newspaper Company. p. 10. 
  19. ^ Brown, p. 8–10.
  20. ^ W. R. Holloway (1870). Indianapolis: A Historical and Statistical Sketch of the Railroad City, A Chronicle of its Social, Municipal, Commercial and Manufacturing Progress with Full Statistical Tables. Indianapolis, Ind.: Indianapolis Journal. p. 20. 
  21. ^ Hyman, The Journal Handbook of Indianapolis, p. 80.
  22. ^ Daniel F. Evans (1996). At Home in Indiana for One Hundred and Seventy-Five Years, 1821-1996. Indianapolis, Ind.: Guild Press of Indiana. pp. 27, 38–39, and 63. ISBN 1878208799. 
  23. ^ Alvah C. Waggoner (1947). "One Hundred Twenty-Five Years: Issued on the Occasion of the Celebration of the One Hundred Twenty Fifth Anniversary of the Organization of the First Baptist Church of Indianapolis". Indianapolis, Ind.: First Baptist Church. pp. 8–10. 
  24. ^ Harold R. Hoffman (1966). A Light in the Forest: A History of the First Baptist Church of Indianapolis, Indiana, 1822-2003. Carmel, Ind.: UN Communications. p. 17–20 and 79–80. 
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References[edit]

  • "125th Anniversary Celebration, 1851-1976: Tabernacle Presbyterian Church, Indianapolis, Indiana". Indianapolis, Ind.: Tabernacle Presbyterian Church. 1976. 
  • Baer, M. Teresa (2012). Indianapolis: A City of Immigrants. Indianapolis: Indiana Historical Society. ISBN 978-0-87195-299-8. 
  • Berry, S. L. (2011). Stacks: A History of the Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library. Indianapolis, Ind.: Indianapolis Marion County Public Library Foundation. ISBN 9780615445021. 
  • Bodenhamer, David J., and Robert G. Barrows, eds. (1994). The Encyclopedia of Indianapolis. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press. ISBN 0-253-31222-1. 
  • Brown, Ignatius (1868). Logan’s History of Indianapolis from 1818. Indianapolis, Ind.: Logan and Company. 
  • Dunn, Jacob Piatt (1910). Greater Indianapolis: The History, the Industries, the Institutions, and the People of a City of Homes I. Chicago: The Lewis Publishing Company. 
  • Dunn, Jacob Piatt (1919). Indiana and Indianans III. Chicago and New York: American Historical Society. 
  • Esarey, Logan, Kate Milner Rabb, and William Herschell, eds. (1924). History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922; Also An Account of Indianapolis and Marion County (2nd ed.). Dayton, Ohio: Dayton Historical Publishing Company. 
  • Fadely, James Philip (Winter 2006). "The Veteran and the Memorial: George J. Gangsdale and the Soldiers and Sailors Monument". Traces of Indiana and Midwestern History (Indianapolis: Indiana Historical Society) 18 (1): 33–35. 
  • Gaus, Laura Sheerin (1985). Shortridge High School, 1864–1981, in Retrospect. Indianapolis: Indiana Historical Society. ISBN 9780871950031. 
  • Geib, George W. (1981). Indianapolis: Hoosiers’ Circle City. American Portrait Series. Tulsa, Okla.: Continental Heritage Press. ISBN 9780932986191. 
  • Geib, George, and Miriam Geib (1994). Indianapolis First. Indianapolis, Ind.: Indianapolis Chamber of Commerce. ISBN 0-9627335-0-4. 
  • Hale, Hester Ann (1987). Indianapolis, The First Century. Indianapolis, Ind.: Marion County Historical Society. 
  • Historical Sketches of Eight-Eight Churches. Indianapolis, Ind.: The History Committee, Whitewater Valley Presbytery. 1976. 
  • "The History of Nine Urban Churches". Indianapolis, Ind.: The Riley-Lockerbie Ministerial Association of Downtown Indianapolis. 
  • Hoffman, Harold R. (1966). A Light in the Forest: A History of the First Baptist Church of Indianapolis, Indiana, 1822-2003. Carmel, Ind.: UN Communications. 
  • Holloway, W. R. (1870). Indianapolis: A Historical and Statistical Sketch of the Railroad City, A Chronicle of its Social, Municipal, Commercial and Manufacturing Progress with Full Statistical Tables. Indianapolis, Ind.: Indianapolis Journal. 
  • Howard, A.C. (1857). A. C. Howard’s Directory for the City of Indianapolis: Containing a Correct List of Citizens’ Names, Their Residence and Place of Business, with a Historical Sketch of Indianapolis from its Earliest History to the Present Day. Indianapolis, Ind.: A. C. Howard and Company. 
  • Hyman, Max R. , ed. (1902). The Journal Handbook of Indianapolis: An Outline History. Indianapolis, Ind.: The Indianapolis Journal Newspaper Company. 
  • Indiana Centennial Celebration Committee, Historical Committee (1920). Centennial History of Indianapolis: An Outline History. Indianapolis, Ind.: Max R. Hyman. 
  • Indianapolis, A Walk Through Time: A Self-Guided Tour of Historic Sites in the Mile Square Area. Indianapolis, Ind.: Marion County-Indianapolis Historical Society. 1996. 
  • Milestones 2000: A 20th Century Retrospective. Indianapolis, Ind.: Indianapolis Business Journal. 1999. 
  • Miller, John W. (1982). Indiana Newspaper Bibliography: Historical Accounts of All Indiana Newspapers Published from 1804 to 1980 and Locational Information for All Available Copies, Both Original and Microfilm. Indianapolis: Indiana Historical Society. 
  • Probst, George T., and Eberhard Reichmann (1989). The Germans in Indianapolis 1840-1918. Indianapolis, Ind.: German-American Center and Indiana German Heritage Society. 
  • Rosenberg, Ethel, and David Rosenberg (1979). To 120 Year!: A Social History of the Indianapolis Hebrew Congregation, 1856–1976. Indianapolis, Ind.: Indianapolis Hebrew Congregation. 
  • Rudolph, L. C. (1995). Hoosier Faiths: A History of Indiana’s Churches and Religious Groups. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press. ISBN 0-253-32882-9. 
  • Stineman, William F., and Jack W. Porter (1986). Saint John the Evangelist Church : A Photographic Essay of the Oldest Catholic Church in Indianapolis and Marion County. Indianapolis, Ind.: St. John the Evangelist Church. ISBN 0961613408. 
  • Sulgrove, Berry R. (1884). History of Indianapolis and Marion County Indiana. Philadelphia: L. H. Everts and Company. 
  • Weintraut and Associates Historians, Inc. (2000). "For the Children’s Sake: A History of the Children’s Bureau of Indianapolis, Inc.". Indianapolis, Ind.: Children’s Bureau of Indianapolis. 
  • White, Joseph M. (1997). An Urban Pilgrimage: A Centennial History of the Catholic Community of Holy Cross, Indianapolis, 1896–1996. Indinanapolis, Ind.: Joseph M. White. 
  • Wissing, Douglas A. (2013). Crown Hill: History, Spirit, and Sanctuary. Indianapolis: Indiana Historical Society Press. ISBN 9780871953018. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

Images[edit]