Timeline of Kampala

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The following is a timeline of the history of Kampala, Buganda, Uganda.

Prior to 20th century[edit]

20th century[edit]

21st century[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i The Red Book 1922-23: Handbook and Directory for Kenya Colony and Protectorate, Uganda Protectorate, Tanganyika Territory, and Zanzibar Sultanate. Nairobi: East African Standard Ltd. 1922. 
  2. ^ a b "Uganda", Encyclopaedia Britannica (11th ed.), New York: Encyclopaedia Britannica Co., 1910, OCLC 14782424 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h David Kiyaga-Mulindwa (2004). "Kampala". In Kevin Shillington. Encyclopedia of African History. Routledge. pp. 731–2. ISBN 978-1-135-45670-2. 
  4. ^ "Railway Age Gazette". New York. 1915. 
  5. ^ "Chronology of Catholic Dioceses: Uganda". www.katolsk.no. Norway: Oslo katolske bispedømme (Oslo Catholic Diocese). Retrieved September 2014. 
  6. ^ a b c d "Uganda Profile: Timeline". BBC News. Retrieved 23 February 2013. 
  7. ^ C.J. Endra (2002), "Public and School Libraries in Uganda", Proceedings of the PanAfrican PanArab Conference on Public and School Libraries, Netherlands: International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, ISBN 9070916851 
  8. ^ "Uganda National Cultural Centre". Retrieved 23 February 2013. 
  9. ^ Don Rubin, ed. (1997), World Encyclopedia of Contemporary Theatre, London: Routledge 
  10. ^ a b c d "Uganda". www.citypopulation.de. Oldenburg, Germany: Thomas Brinkhoff. Retrieved 23 February 2013. 
  11. ^ "Uganda". Political Chronology of Africa. Political Chronologies of the World. Europa Publications. 2001. ISBN 0203409957. 
  12. ^ "Watotochurch.com". Retrieved 23 February 2013. 
  13. ^ "Uganda: Directory". Africa South of the Sahara 2004. Regional Surveys of the World. Europa Publications. 2004. ISBN 1857431839. 
  14. ^ a b c d e Karen Fung (ed.). "Uganda: News". Africa South of the Sahara: Selected Internet Resources. USA: Stanford University. Retrieved 23 February 2013. 
  15. ^ Ari Nave (2010). "Kampala". In Kwame Anthony Appiah and Henry Louis Gates. Encyclopedia of Africa. Oxford University Press. p. 630. ISBN 978-0-19-533770-9. 
  16. ^ Julie Bosman (July 15, 2012). "Big Air in Kampala". New York Times. Retrieved 23 February 2013. 
  17. ^ Andreas Mehler et al., ed. (2008). "Uganda". Africa Yearbook: Politics, Economy and Society South of the Sahara in 2007 4. Koninklijke Brill. ISBN 90-04-16805-2. 
  18. ^ "Uganda Community Libraries Association". Retrieved October 2014. 
  19. ^ "Economist". 24 February 2011. Retrieved 23 February 2013. 
  20. ^ "Kampala hit by renewed violence". BBC News. 11 September 2009. 
  21. ^ "Nine Dead in Kampala Riots". Global Voices. 11 September 2009. 
  22. ^ "Uganda: Students riot, Kampala burns". Global Voices. 17 March 2010. 
  23. ^ Protests in Uganda Over Rising Prices Grow Violent, New York Times, 21 April 2011 
  24. ^ "The State of African Cities 2014". United Nations Human Settlements Programme. ISBN 978-92-1-132598-0. Retrieved September 2014. 
  25. ^ We need to create awareness about African literature produced here, The EastAfrican, 4 July 2014 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]