Timeline of Kampala

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The following is a timeline of the history of Kampala, Buganda, Uganda.

19th century[edit]

20th century[edit]

  • 1901 - Kampala Sports Club formed.[1]
  • 1904 - St. Paul's church built in Mengo.[2]
  • 1905 - Government station relocated to Nakasero Hill.[1]
  • 1910 - Goan Institute established.[1]
  • 1911 - Kamapala Club founded.[1]
  • 1913 - Indian Association formed.[1]
  • 1917 - Kampala Public Library established.[1]
  • 1921 - Central Council of Indian Associations of Uganda headquartered in Kampala.[1]
  • 1950 - July 28: Knifing at hospital.
  • 1963 - City becomes part of republic of Uganda.[4]
  • 1965 - Apollo Hotel in business.
  • 1969 - Population: 330,700.[8]
  • 1970 - Crested Towers built.
  • 1971 - January 25: Coup.
  • 1991 - Population: 774,241.[8]

21st century[edit]

  • 2002 - Population: 1,189,142.[8]
  • 2004 - Observer newspaper begins publication.[10]
  • 2008 - Memonet (media network) formed.[10]
  • 2009 - September: Conflict between Buganda partisans and police.[13]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i The Red Book 1922-23: Handbook and Directory for Kenya Colony and Protectorate, Uganda Protectorate, Tanganyika Territory, and Zanzibar Sultanate. Nairobi: East African Standard Ltd. 1922. 
  2. ^ a b "Uganda", Encyclopaedia Britannica (11th ed.), New York: Encyclopaedia Britannica Co., 1910, OCLC 14782424 
  3. ^ "Railway Age Gazette". New York. 1915. 
  4. ^ a b c d "Uganda Profile: Timeline". BBC News. Retrieved February 23, 2013. 
  5. ^ C.J. Endra (2002), "Public and School Libraries in Uganda", Proceedings of the PanAfrican PanArab Conference on Public and School Libraries, The Hague, Netherlands: International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, ISBN 9070916851 
  6. ^ "Uganda National Cultural Centre". Retrieved February 23, 2013. 
  7. ^ Don Rubin, ed. (1997), World Encyclopedia of Contemporary Theatre, London: Routledge 
  8. ^ a b c d e "Uganda". www.citypopulation.de. Oldenburg, Germany: Thomas Brinkhoff. Retrieved February 23, 2013. 
  9. ^ "Watotochurch.com". Retrieved February 23, 2013. 
  10. ^ a b c d e "Uganda: News". Africa South of the Sahara. USA: Stanford University. Retrieved February 23, 2013. 
  11. ^ Julie Bosman (July 15, 2012). "Big Air in Kampala". New York Times. Retrieved February 23, 2013. 
  12. ^ "Economist". February 24, 2011. Retrieved February 23, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Kampala hit by renewed violence". BBC News. September 11, 2009. 

External links[edit]