Timeline of Lynn, Massachusetts

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The following is a timeline of the history of Lynn, Massachusetts, USA.

17th-18th century[edit]

  • 1629 - Saugus founded.
  • 1637 - Saugus renamed "Lynn"[1]
  • 1642 - Saugus Iron Works in business.[2]
  • 1644 - Reading separates from Lynn.[1]
  • 1720 - Lynnfield burying-ground established.[3]
  • 1732 - Saugus burying-ground established.[3]
  • 1782 - Lynnfield separates from Lynn.[1]
  • 1793 - Post office in operation.[3]
  • 1797 - Population: 2,291.[4]

19th century[edit]

  • 1803 - Floating Bridge constructed on Salem-Boston turnpike.[3]
  • 1812 - Eastern Burial-Place established.[3]
  • 1814 - Town House built.[5]
  • 1815
Lyceum building
Ezra W. Mudge
Music Hall
St. Stephen's Memorial Episcopal Church
G.A.R. Hall and Museum
Emblem of Lynn Historical Society, 1898

20th century[edit]

Vamp Building
Walter H. Creamer
Lynn Post Office
Capitol Diner
Lynn City Hall

21st century[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Lynn", The Encyclopaedia Britannica (11th ed.), New York: Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1910, OCLC 14782424 
  2. ^ C. J. H. Woodbury (1892), The Saugus Iron Works at Lynn, Mass, Lynn, Mass: Press of Thos. P. Nichols, OCLC 6545698 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i Benjamin F. Arrington (1922), "City of Lynn", Municipal history of Essex County in Massachusetts, New York: Lewis historical publishing company, OCLC 1619460 
  4. ^ Jedidiah Morse (1797), "Lynn", The American gazetteer, Boston: At the presses of S. Hall, and Thomas & Andrews 
  5. ^ a b c d e "City of Lynn", Industries of Massachusetts: historical and descriptive review of Lynn, Lowell, Lawrence, Haverhill, Salem, Beverly, Peabody, Danvers, Gloucester, Newburyport, and Amesbury, and their leading manufacturers and merchants, New York: International Pub. Co., 1886, OCLC 19803267 
  6. ^ a b Davies Project. "American Libraries before 1876". Princeton University. Retrieved October 1, 2012. 
  7. ^ a b c d e "US Newspaper Directory". Chronicling America. Washington DC: Library of Congress. Retrieved October 1, 2012. 
  8. ^ "Lynn Natural History Society". Magazine of Horticuture (Boston, Mass.: Hovey & Co.). October 1843. 
  9. ^ a b c James R. Newhall (1890), History of Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts, 2 (1864-1893), Lynn: G. C. Herbert, OCLC 2882816 
  10. ^ "High Rock Park". City of Lynn. Retrieved October 1, 2012. 
  11. ^ Carlson, Stephen P. (1980). All Aboard!. Saugus, Massachusetts: Stephen P. Carlson. 
  12. ^ a b Bradlee, Francis F. C. (1917). The Eastern Railroad: A Historical Account of Early Railroading in Eastern New England. Salem, MA: The Essex Institute. 
  13. ^ Lynn Public Library. "About our library". Retrieved October 1, 2012. 
  14. ^ David Newhall Johnson (1880), Sketches of Lynn: or, the changes of 50 years, Lynn, Mass.: T. P. Nichols, printer 
  15. ^ Fraser, Caroline (1999). God's Perfect Child: Living and Dying in the Christian Science Church. Henry Holt and Company. p. 52. ISBN 978-0805044317. Retrieved August 26, 2013. 
  16. ^ The City Hall of Lynn, Lynn, Mass.: T. P. Nichols, printer, 1869 
  17. ^ Proceedings in Lynn, Massachusetts, June 17, 1879: being the two hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the settlement, Lynn, Mass.: Published by order of the City Council, 1880, OCLC 4042721 
  18. ^ "Lynn Woods Reservation". City of Lynn. Retrieved October 1, 2012. 
  19. ^ W.H. Michael (1889). "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: Fiftieth Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 
  20. ^ "FAQs: How did the firm impact the advent of electricity?". J.P. Morgan. Retrieved 3 February 2013. 
  21. ^ a b c Belcher, Jonathan (31 December 2011). "Changes to Transit Service in the MBTA district" (PDF). NETransit. Retrieved 13 March 2012. 

Further reading[edit]

Published in the 19th century

External links[edit]