Timeline of Mobile, Alabama

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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Mobile, Alabama, USA.

Prior to 19th century[edit]

19th century[edit]

  • 1810 - Mobile becomes part of the independent Republic of West Florida.
  • 1813
    • Spanish West Florida annexed to the United States.
    • Mobile Gazette newspaper begins publication.[2]
  • 1814 - Town of Mobile incorporated.
  • 1819 - City of Mobile incorporated.
  • 1821 - Mobile Commercial Register begins publication.
  • 1827 - Fire.[3]
  • 1829 - Mobile Female Benevolent Society founded.[4]
  • 1830 - City Hospital established.[4]
  • 1835 - Franklin Society Reading Room and Library founded.[5][6]
  • 1839 - October 2: Fire.[7]
  • 1840 - St. Francis Street Methodist Church founded.[4]
  • 1844 - Shaarai Shomayim congregation formed.[8]
  • 1850
  • 1852 - Public schooling begins in Barton Academy building.[9]
  • 1854 - Mobile Area Chamber of Commerce chartered.[4]
  • 1855 - Publisher S.H. Goetzel in business (approximate date).[10]
  • 1857 - City Hall built.

1860s[edit]

1870s-1890s[edit]

  • 1871 - Mobile Cotton Exchange established.
  • 1883 - Fidelia Club formed.[12]
  • 1889 - Mobile County Courthouse built.
  • 1894 - Clara Schumann Club (music group) formed.[4]

20th century[edit]

  • 1902 - Mobile Public Library established.
  • 1907 - Union Depot built.
  • 1910 - Population: 51,521.[1]
  • 1914 - Rotary Club of Mobile organized.[4]
  • 1918 - Alabama Dry Dock and Shipbuilding Company in business.[13]
  • 1925 - Lincoln Theatre built.[14]
  • 1927 - Saenger Theatre built.[14]
  • 1929
  • 1936 - American Association of University Women of Mobile organized.[4]
  • 1937 - Aluminum Ore Company refining plant constructed.[4]
  • 1953 - Consular Corps of Mobile organized (approximate date).[4]
  • 1962 - Mobile Genealogical Society founded.[15]
  • 1964 - Mobile British Women's Club active (approximate date).[4]
  • 1966 - Neighborhood Organized Workers established.[4]
  • 1974 - Azalea City News begins publication.[13]
  • 1985 - U.S. Naval Station Mobile opens.
  • 1989 - Mike Dow becomes mayor.[16]
  • 1995 - Bayfest (Mobile) (music festival) begins.

21st century[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Thomas McAdory Owen (1921), "Mobile", History of Alabama and dictionary of Alabama biography, Chicago: S.J. Clarke, OCLC 1872130 
  2. ^ a b c "US Newspaper Directory". Chronicling America. Washington DC: Library of Congress. Retrieved June 25, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Mobile", The North American Tourist, New York: A.T. Goodrich, 1839 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o McCall Library. "Collections". University of South Alabama. Retrieved June 25, 2013. 
  5. ^ a b Davies Project. "American Libraries before 1876". Princeton University. Retrieved June 25, 2013. 
  6. ^ Charles Coffin Jewett (1851), "Alabama", Notices of public libraries in the United States of America, Washington, D.C: U.S. House of Representatives, OCLC 18394449 
  7. ^ Hazard's United States Commercial and Statistical Register 1. Philadelphia. November 1839. 
  8. ^ "Mobile, Alabama". Encyclopedia of Southern Jewish Communities. Jackson, Mississippi: Goldring / Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life. Retrieved June 25, 2013. 
  9. ^ Willis G. Clark (1889). "Public School System of Mobile". History of Education in Alabama. U.S. Bureau of Education, Circular of Information. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 
  10. ^ "Hathi Trust". Retrieved June 25, 2013. 
  11. ^ Toyin Falola and Amanda Warnock, ed. (2007). "Chronology". Encyclopedia of the Middle Passage. Greenwood Press. ISBN 978-0-313-33480-1. 
  12. ^ Tom McGehee (January 2012). "The Former Higgins Mortuary". Mobile Bay. Retrieved June 25, 2013. 
  13. ^ a b "Guide to Printed Material at The Doy Leale McCall Rare Book and Manuscript Library". University of South Alabama. Retrieved June 25, 2013. 
  14. ^ a b "Historic Theatre Inventory". Maryland, USA: League of Historic American Theatres. Retrieved June 25, 2013. 
  15. ^ "Mobile Genealogical Society". Retrieved June 25, 2013. 
  16. ^ "Mayor". City of Mobile. Archived from the original on August 3, 2001. Retrieved June 25, 2013. 
  17. ^ "Meet the Mayors". Washington, DC: United States Conference of Mayors. Retrieved June 25, 2013. 

Further reading[edit]

Published in the 19th century
Published in the 20th century
  • "Mobile", The United States (4th ed.), Leipzig: K. Baedeker, 1909, OCLC 02338437 
  • "Mobile", Encyclopaedia Britannica (11th ed.), New York: Encyclopaedia Britannica Co., 1910, OCLC 14782424 
  • Peter J. Hamilton (1912), Bicentennial Celebration ... of the Founding of Mobile, Mobile: Commercial Printing Company 
  • Erwin Craighead (1914), The literary history of Mobile, OCLC 5058844 
  • "Mobile". Automobile Blue Book. USA. 1919.  Map
  • Federal Writers' Project (1941), "Mobile", Alabama; a Guide to the Deep South, American Guide Series, New York: Hastings House 
  • "Mobile, Alabama's City in Motion", National Geographic Magazine (Washington DC) 133, 1968 
  • Harriet Elizabeth Amos (1978). "All-Absorbing Topics: Food and Clothing in Confederate Mobile". Atlanta Historical Society Journal (22). 
  • Ory Mazar Nergal, ed. (1980), "Mobile, AL", Encyclopedia of American Cities, New York: E.P. Dutton, OL 4120668M 
  • Harriet Elizabeth Amos (1981). "City Belles: Images and Realities of Lives of White Women in Antebellum Mobile". Alabama Review 34. 
  • Harriet Elizabeth Amos (1985). Cotton City: Urban Development in Antebellum Mobile. University of Alabama Press. 
  • Don Harrison Doyle (1990), New Men, New Cities, New South: Atlanta, Nashville, Charleston, Mobile, 1860-1910, Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, ISBN 0807818836 
  • Bergeron, Arthur W. Confederate Mobile. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1991.
  • Higganbotham, Jay. Old Mobile: Fort Louis de la Louisiane, 1702-1711. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1991.
  • Bruce Nelson (1993). "Organized Labor and the Struggle for Black Equality in Mobile during World War II". Journal of American History 80. JSTOR 2080410. 
  • "The South: Alabama: Mobile", USA, Let's Go, New York: St. Martin's Press, 1999, OL 24937240M 
Published in the 21st century
  • Michael Thomason (2001), Mobile: The New History of Alabama's First City, University Alabama Press, ISBN 9780817310653 
  • Fitzgerald, Michael W. Urban Emancipation: Popular Politics in Reconstruction Mobile, 1860-1890. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2002.
  • Pride, Richard. The Political Use of Racial Narratives: School Desegregation in Mobile, Alabama, 1954-1997. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2002.
  • Gregory A. Waselkov (2002). "French Colonial Archaeology at Old Mobile: An Introduction". Historical Archaeology 36. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 30°41′40″N 88°02′35″W / 30.694444°N 88.043056°W / 30.694444; -88.043056