Timeline of Monterrey, Mexico

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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Monterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico.

Prior to 20th century[edit]

  • 1584 - Ojos de Santa Lucia outpost established by Spaniards.[1]
  • 1596 - Settlement named "Ciudad Metropolitana de Nuestra Senora de Monterrey" by Diego de Montemayor.[2]
  • 1603 - Cathedral construction begins.[1]
  • 1730 - Church of San Francisco rebuilt.[3]
  • 1775 - Population: 258.[1]
  • 1777 - Monterrey becomes seat of Catholic Linares bishopric.[2]
  • 1790 - Bishop's Palace built.[3]
  • 1824 - Monterrey becomes capital of Nuevo León state.[2]
  • 1833 - Cathedral consecrated.[3]
  • 1846 - Town occupied by United States forces.[1]
  • 1847 - American Pioneer newspaper begins publication.[4]
  • 1864 - Town occupied by French forces.[1]
  • 1866 - French occupation ends.[2]
  • 1881 - Railway constructed.[2]
  • 1890 - Cerveceria Cuauhtemoc (brewery) founded.[2]
  • 1892 - Monterrey News English-language newspaper in publication.[5]
  • 1896 - El Espectador newspaper begins publication.[4]
  • 1899 - Banco Mercantil de Monterrey established.[6]

20th century[edit]

21st century[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Baedeker's Mexico, 1994, p. 341+  (fulltext via OpenLibrary)
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Northeast Mexico: Monterrey", Mexico, Lonely Planet, 1998  (fulltext via OpenLibrary)
  3. ^ a b c Reau Campbell (1909), "Monterey", Campbell's New Revised Complete Guide and Descriptive Book of Mexico, Chicago: Rogers & Smith Co., OCLC 1667015 
  4. ^ a b c "Global Resources Network". Chicago, USA: Center for Research Libraries. Retrieved March 17, 2014. 
  5. ^ a b c d David Marley (2005), "Monterrey", Historic Cities of the Americas 1, Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO, pp. 267–276, ISBN 1576070271 
  6. ^ Pablo Livas (1909). El estado de Nuevo León, su situación económica al aproximarse el Centenario de la Independencia de México (in Spanish). Monterrey. 
  7. ^ a b "Monterrey", Encyclopaedia Britannica (11th ed.), New York: Encyclopaedia Britannica Co., 1910, OCLC 14782424 
  8. ^ Michael David Snodgrass (1998). "Birth and Consequences of Industrial Paternalism in Monterrey, Mexico, 1890-1940". International Labor and Working-Class History (53). JSTOR 27672459. 
  9. ^ "Movie Theaters in Monterrey, Mexico". CinemaTreasures.org. Los Angeles: Cinema Treasures LLC. Retrieved March 17, 2014. 
  10. ^ "Mexican Mayors". City Mayors.com. London: City Mayors Foundation. Retrieved March 17, 2014. 
  11. ^ "Population of Capital Cities and Cities of 100,000 or More Inhabitants". Demographic Yearbook 2011. United Nations Statistics Division. 2012. Retrieved March 17, 2014. 

Further reading[edit]

Published in the 19th century[edit]

Published in the 20th century[edit]

  • W.H. Koebel, ed. (1921), "Mexico: Chief Towns: Monterey", Anglo-South American Handbook 1, New York: Macmillan 
  • Ernst B. Filsinger (1922), "Mexico: Monterey", Commercial Travelers' Guide to Latin America, Washington, DC: Government Printing Office 
  • Samuel N. Dicken (1939). "Monterrey and Northeastern Mexico". Annals of the Association of American Geographers 29. JSTOR 2560958. 
  • Harley L. Browning and Waltraut Feindt (1971). "Patterns of Migration to Monterrey, Mexico". International Migration Review 5. JSTOR 3002646. 
  • "Social and Economic Context of Migration to Monterrey, Mexico," in Francine F. Rabinovitz and Felicity M. Trueblood, eds., Latin American Urban Annual, Vol. 1 (Beverly Hills, California: Sage Publications, 1971).
  • Alex Saragoza, The Monterrey Elite and the Mexican State, 1880-1940 (Austin, 1988)
  • Vivienne Bennett. 1995. The Politics of Water: Urban Protest, Gender, and Power in Monterrey, Mexico. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press.
  • "Northeast Mexico: Nuevo Leon: Monterrey", Mexico, Let's Go, 1999  (fulltext via OpenLibrary)
  • John Fisher (1999), "Between the Sierras: Northeast Routes: Monterrey", Mexico, Rough Guides (4th ed.), London, p. 151+, OL 24935876M 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 25°40′00″N 100°18′00″W / 25.666667°N 100.3°W / 25.666667; -100.3