Timeline of Skopje

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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Skopje, Macedonia.[nb 1]

Prior to 20th century[edit]

See also: Scupi
  • 518 CE - Earthquake.[1]
  • 6th century CE - Town rebuilt; called "Justiniana Prima."[2]
  • 7th century - Slavs in power.[2]
  • 1443 - Islamic library established.[6]
  • 1465 - Madrasa of Ishak Beg established.[6]
  • 1467 - Kapan Han (caravanserai) active (approximate date).
  • 1485 - Kodja Mustafa mosque built.[2]
  • 1495 - Karlozade mosque built.[2]
  • 1520 - Earthquake.[3]
  • 1569 - Population: 10,525.
  • 1572 - Political unrest.[3]
  • 1584 - Political unrest.[3]
  • 1595 - Political unrest.[3]
  • 1873 - Salonika-Uskub-Mitrovica railway begins operating.[2]
  • 1882 - Population: 34,152.

20th century[edit]

  • 1912
    • August: Albanians in power.
    • Spiro Hadzhi Ristic becomes mayor.
  • 1921 - Population: 32,249.[2]
  • 1929 - Josif Mihajlović becomes mayor.
  • 1931 - Population: 64,807.[2]
  • 1936 - Freedom Bridge built.
  • 1941
    • April: City taken by German forces.[7]
    • Spiro Kitinchev becomes mayor.
  • 1944
    • Nova Makedonija newspaper begins publication.[8]
    • Public hospital established.[citation needed]
    • Lazar Tanev becomes mayor.
  • 1953 - Population: 139,200.
  • 1974 - Metodi Antonov becomes mayor.
  • 1986 - Jugoslav Todorovski becomes mayor.
  • 1991 - Milan Talevski becomes mayor.
  • 1992 - July: Political demonstration.[10]
  • 1997 - Center for Strategic Research and Documentation founded.[12]
  • 1998 - Albanian demonstration.[13]
  • 1999 - Euro-Balkan Institute headquartered in city.[12]

21st century[edit]

  • 2002
    • May: Labour unrest.[17]
    • Population: 506,926; metro 668,518.
  • 2012 - March: Ethnic unrest.[13]
  • 2013 - March: Ethnic unrest.[20]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The city of Skopje has been known by several names: Iskubia, Scopia, Scupi, Skopia, Skopie, Skopje, Skoplje, Skoplye, Uscub, Uscup, Ushküp, Uskiup, Üsküb, Usküp. See also: Other names of Skopje.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Usküb", Encyclopaedia Britannica (11th ed.), New York: Encyclopaedia Britannica Co., 1910, OCLC 14782424 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Fehim Bajraktarević (1936). "Üsküb". Encyclopaedia of Islam. E.J. Brill. p. 1052+. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i Randall J. Van Vynckt (1996). "Skopje". In Trudy Ring. Southern Europe. International Dictionary of Historic Places 3. Fitzroy Dearborn. OCLC 31045650. 
  4. ^ a b c Leon E. Seltzer, ed. (1952), Columbia Lippincott Gazetteer of the World, New York: Columbia University Press, p. 1781, OL 6112221M 
  5. ^ Ferdinand Schevill (1922), History of the Balkan Peninsula, New York: Harcourt, Brace 
  6. ^ a b c d H.T. Norris (1993), Islam in the Balkans, Columbia, S.C: University of South Carolina Press, ISBN 0872499774 
  7. ^ Webster's Geographical Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, USA: G. & C. Merriam Co., 1960, p. 1052, OCLC 3832886 
  8. ^ "Global Resources Network". Chicago, USA: Center for Research Libraries. Retrieved 29 December 2013. 
  9. ^ "Members". Global Investigative Journalism Network. Retrieved 29 December 2013. 
  10. ^ "Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia". Europa World Year Book 2004. Taylor & Francis. ISBN 1857432533. 
  11. ^ ArchNet.org. "Skopje". Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA: MIT School of Architecture and Planning. Retrieved 29 December 2013. 
  12. ^ a b "Think Tank Directory". Philadelphia, USA: Foreign Policy Research Institute. Retrieved 28 December 2013. 
  13. ^ a b c "Macedonia Profile: Timeline". BBC News. Retrieved 29 December 2013. 
  14. ^ "U.S. Wades Into Macedonian Conflict and Skopje Erupts". New York Times. 25 June 2001. Retrieved 29 December 2013. 
  15. ^ "Mobs Protest In Macedonia". New York Times. 25 July 2001. Retrieved 29 December 2013. 
  16. ^ "Violence on Both Sides in Macedonia Mars Peace Accord". New York Times. 10 August 2001. Retrieved 29 December 2013. 
  17. ^ "Global Nonviolent Action Database". Pennsylvania, USA: Swarthmore College. Retrieved 29 December 2013. 
  18. ^ "Macedonia". Art Spaces Directory. New York: New Museum. Retrieved 29 December 2013. 
  19. ^ "Skopje Journal: Weary of Greek Pressure, Macedonia Claims a Hero". New York Times. 4 July 2011. Retrieved 29 December 2013. 
  20. ^ "Ethnic Albanians clash with police in Macedonia". Reuters. 2 March 2013. Retrieved 29 December 2013. 

This article incorporates information from the French Wikipedia and Macedonian Wikipedia.

Further reading[edit]

  • S. Bouzarovski (2011). "Skopje". Cities 28. 
  • Roman A. Cybriwsky (2013). "Skopje". Capital Cities around the World: An Encyclopedia of Geography, History, and Culture. ABC-CLIO. p. 281+. ISBN 978-1-61069-248-9. 

External links[edit]