Timeline of the University of Idaho

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Timeline of University of Idaho[edit]

History - timeline[edit]

On January 30, 1889, Governor Edward Stevenson of the Idaho Territory signed the territorial legislature's Council Bill No. 20, which officially established the UI as the upcoming state's land-grant institution. Nearly four years later, the university opened for classes on October 3, 1892.[1] The choice of location for the University of Idaho was an "Olive Branch of Peace" by Gov. Stevenson for his actions in styming the nearly successful effort to detach the North Idaho Panhandle and making it part of the State of Washington.[2]

  • 1889 - Beta Sigma established as first sorority[3]
  • 1896 - first four undergraduate degrees awarded[4] - (photo)
  • 1898 - first graduate degree awarded[4]
    • UI Alumni Association established
  • 1899 - UI opens first summer school in Northwest - June 21 - (photo)
  • 1901 - College of Agriculture established
    • original Engineering Building opens (originally Applied Science, then Mines, then Engineering) - (photo-1) - (photo-2)
      - demolished in 1951 (unsafe), on site of present Niccolls Building (Home Economics, opened 1952)
  • 1902 - Ridenbaugh Hall completed - (photo-1) - (photo-2)
    • Department of Domestic Science (later Home Economics) established; first in Pacific Northwest - June 11
  • 1904–present Art & Architecture South building completed; originally a gymnasium & armory - (photo)
    became Women's Gym in 1928, remodeled for A&A in 1976
  • 1905 - First National Greek organization in Idaho (Kappa Sigma), arrives on September 30, 1905
  • 1906 - original Admin. Building (photo-1) (photo-2) burns down - March 30 - (photo) - remains later dynamited - (photo)
    • Metallurgical Lab completed, became Mines (1950), Psychology (1961), A&A (2001) - Pine St. - (photo-left) - (photo-right)
    • Assay Building completed - (later Geology), 1955-84 gallery & museum, demolished in 1984 for Life Sciences North (Gibb Hall)
  • 1907 - Morrill Hall completed - (photo-1) - (photo-2) - financed with insurance funds from destroyed Admin bldg.
    - (originally for Agriculture, then Forestry in 1950) - Idaho Ave @ Pine St.
    • College of Engineering established in cooperation with the College of Mines[5]
    • construction of new Administration Building begins
  • 1908 - Olmsted Brothers develop master plan for UI campus
  • 1909 - new Administration Building opens (Tudor Gothic) - (later photo)
  • 1910 - Arboretum begun by Charles H. Shattuck, head of forestry department - (photo)
  • 1911 - Theodore Roosevelt spoke at the new Ad. Bldg on April 9, 1911 - (photo-1) - (photo-2) on a platform built of Palouse wheat
    • College of Engineering formally established - October 27[5]
  • 1912 - North wing of Admin. Building completed - (photo-1) - (photo-2) - (photo-3) - (photo-4)
    includes auditorium - (first two floors)
  • 1916 - South wing of Admin. Building initially completed, extended in 1936 for library
  • 1920 - School of Education established - June 7
    • Lindley Hall (first dormitory) opens in September - occupied site east of Life Sciences North (Gibb Hall),
      SW corner of Idaho & Ash; condemned in 1971, demolished in 1973[6]
  • 1922 - UI joins Pacific Coast Conference - member until mid-1959 when PCC disbands
  • 1923 - current Continuing Education Bldg completed; originally Forney Hall (women's dorm) - (photo-1) - (photo-2)
  • 1924 - current Life Sciences South building completed, originally "Science Building" - (photo) - (photo-left)
  • 1927 - current Alumni Center completed, originally Hays Hall (women's dorm) - (photo)
    • current steam plant bldg completed - NE corner of 6th & Line St.
  • 1928 - Memorial Gymnasium completed - honors state's World War I service - (photo-1) - (photo-2) - (photo-3)
  • 1930 - fourth floor added to Morrill Hall
  • 1936 - Student Union Building (SUB) established after purchase of Blue Bucket Inn - (photo - 1924 constr.) - (photo - 1950 add'n)
    • Student Health Center completed, originally "Infirmary" - (photo)
    • Brink Hall opened; originally Willis Sweet Hall (men's dorm), then Faculty Office Complex (FOC) East, until renamed in 1982.
    • south wing (1916) of Admin. Building (1909) extended for library expansion - (UI Library completed in 1957)
    • total enrollment at 2,568 in October[7]
  • 1937 - UI Golf Course opens (9 holes) - second 9 holes opens in 1970 (5 holes at NW, 4 at E)
  • 1938 - Eleanor Roosevelt speaks at Memorial Gym - March 26
    • Phinney Hall completed; originally Chrisman Hall (men's dorm) - (photo); FOC West until 1982.
  • 1940 - total enrollment at 2,686 [8]
  • 1942 - Gauss ME Laboratory completed - SE corner of 6th & Line St.
    - (orig. Kirtley Lab #1: Charles L. Kirtley was first UI engineering graduate, in first class of 1896, (photo), later a physician)[4]
  • 1943 - Varsity football cancelled due to lack of turnout in fall, returns in 1945
    • Food Research Bldg completed - (orig. Dairy bldg, photo), west side of Morrill Hall, NE corner Line St. & Idaho Ave.
  • 1945 - student radio station KUOI-FM (89.3 MHz) goes on the air - November
    • total enrollment at 1,450 in fall[9]
  • 1946 - Basketball team wins its final Northern Division title in PCC and first since 1923, loses best-of-three title series 2-1 at California[10]
  • 1948 - inaugural Borah Symposium[11] on foreign policy
    • total enrollment of 3,683 in fall[12]
  • 1950 - new Engineering Building (classrooms) - named for Alan Janssen, Dean of Engineering, in 1951[5]
    • Agricultural Science building completed
    • Johnson EE Laboratory completed - (originally Kirtley Lab #2)
    • Administration Building Annex completed, later incorporated into Albertson (2002)
  • 1951 - Music building completed - (photo) - (renamed for Lionel Hampton in 1987) -
    • original Mines, then Engineering Building, (1901) is demolished (unsafe) - (current site of Niccolls (Home Economics))
  • 1952 - Home Economics building completed - (now Niccolls), on site of old Engineering Bldg. (1901–51)
    • new "I" water tower is installed (photo) 500,000 US gallons (1,900 m3)
      - old tower (1916) (photo) at 60,000 US gallons (230 m3) is relocated to the UI farm
  • 1954 - boxing dropped as a varsity sport in June - (national co-champs with Gonzaga in 1950)[13][14]
  • 1955 - Gault-Upham Halls (men's dorms) dedicated - October 15
  • 1956 - Gault Hall arson - 3 fatalities, 4th floor - October 19[15][16] - (photo)[17][18]
    • Arsonist was reporter for UI student newspaper Argonaut, responsible for other campus fires:[19][20]
      convicted of second-degree murder[21] and sentenced to 25 years,[22] paroled in 1968, & died in 1980.
    • total enrollment at 3,674 in fall [23]
  • 1957 - UI Library completed - (photo) - dedicated Nov 2 - on former site of tennis courts - (library was housed in S. wing of Admin. Bldg)
    • Park Village Apts. completed (married & graduate housing) - 3rd & Home St. - demolished 2002
  • 1958 - Two Vandals selected in top 50 of 1958 NFL Draft: Jerry Kramer (39th) & Wayne Walker (45th)
  • 1959 - Pacific Coast Conference disbands in spring; UI independent for 4 years, until Big Sky forms in 1963
    • total enrollment at 3,906 in October[24]
  • 1961 - College of Mines building completed - (photo) - north of Morrill Hall
  • 1963 - Wallace Complex dormitories (two S.wings, 4 floors each) & cafeteria completed
    • UI joins the new Big Sky Conference as a charter member,
      - retains university (later Division I) status for football with its non-conference schedule (all D-I) through 1977, except for 1967 and 1968[25][26]
    • campus radio station KUID-FM (91.7 MHz) goes on the air
    • resident undergraduate fees: $82 per semester [27]
  • 1964 - Physical Sciences building completed - (renamed for Malcolm Renfrew in 1985)
  • 1965 - University Classroom Center (UCC) completed, east of library - closed 2003
    - reconfigured as Teaching & Learning Center, reopened 2005
    • Third wing (NE, 6 floors) of Wallace Complex dormitory completed
    • campus KUID-TV (Ch.12) goes on the air - Idaho Public Television takes over station in 1982
    • visitor information center opens at north entrance - (current police substation) - 3rd & Line St.
    • enrollment at 4,817 in February[28]
  • 1966 - Art & Architecture (North) building completed
  • 1967 - President's Residence (S. side of Shattuck Arboretum) completed
    • Wallace Complex dormitory's fourth & final wing (NW, 6 floors) completed[29]
    • St. Augustine's Catholic Center opens - February - east of SUB[30]
    • Baseball field moves in April, from MacLean Field (College of Education) to Guy Wicks Field (dedicated 1969)
  • 1968 - Buchanan Engineering Laboratory (BEL) completed - (CE, ChE, AgE, EE)[31] - dedicated in May 1969[32]
  • 1969 - College of Education building completed - built on infield of MacLean baseball field
  • 1970 - Swim Center & Women's Gymnasium (P.E. Building) completed - (former right field of MacLean Field (baseball))
    • fire destroys south grandstand of WSU's Rogers Field in April, WSU plays all its home football games
      at Spokane's Joe Albi Stadium, UI remains at Rogers Field with reduced capacity.
    • Navy ROTC building firebombed in May (photo), day after Kent State shootings.
    • South Hill Apartments opened - (married student housing) - first phase
    • second nine holes at ASUI Golf Course opens in August (5 holes @ NW, 4 @ E)
  • 1971 - College of Forestry Building completed (Natural Resources - 2000) - SW corner of 6th & Line St.
    • addition to Agricultural Science Building (1950) is completed
    • new concrete football stadium opens October 9 with natural grass field, enclosed in 1975 to become Kibbie Dome;
      football team posts best record (8-3) to date and wins Big Sky title
    • resident undergraduate fees: $173 per semester [36]
  • 1972 - Tartan Turf, similar to AstroTurf, installed in outdoor football stadium
    • Skiing is dropped as a varsity sport in October[37]
  • 1973 - College of Law Building completed, renamed in 1984 for Albert R. Menard, Jr. (1918–93), former dean (1967–78)[38] - (photo)
    • Idaho is admitted to PCAA,[39] request to leave the Big Sky Conference is denied by state board of education[40][41]
    • Lindley Hall (first dormitory - 1920) is demolished, was condemned in 1971 (east of Gibb Hall)
  • 1974 - "Performing Arts Center" opens in April;[42] renamed for President Hartung in September 1977[43]
    • Big Sky Conference drops conference competition in five sports (baseball, skiing, golf, tennis, and swimming) in May[44][45]
  • 1975 - new "Idaho Stadium" is enclosed after four years to become the Kibbie Dome - September
    • arched roof and vertical end-walls completed for football home opener vs. Idaho State - September 27
    • resident undergraduate fees: $190 per semester [46]
  • 1976 - first basketball game and track meet in Kibbie Dome - January 21 & 24
    • full-time enrollment (Moscow) at 6,517 in fall[47]
  • 1978 - UI descends to the new Division I-AA (with Big Sky moving up to I-AA from Division II).
    • alumnus Don Monson hired as head coach of basketball team in August
    • resident undergraduate fees: $220 per semester [48]
  • 1979 - total enrollment at 8,698 in fall.[49]
  • 1980 - Baseball is dropped as a varsity sport in May,[50] after over 80 years
  • 1981 - men's basketball team wins first Big Sky title and advances to NCAA tournament, finishes at 25-4.
  • 1982 - men's basketball team advances to NCAA Sweet Sixteen in March, finishes at 27-3.
    • Kibbie Dome: East End Addition & composite roof project completed.
    • Idaho Public Television takes over operation of KUID-TV
    • resident undergraduate fees: $408 per semester
  • 1983 - Agricultural Engineering building completed - (renamed "J.W. Martin" - 1990s) - 6th St. & Perimeter Rd.
    • Total enrollment at 9,067 in spring[51]
  • 1984 - KUID-FM (91.7 MHz) funding is cut by state legislature - acquired by KWSU & renamed KRFA[52]
    • Lionel Hampton's first appearance at the UI Jazz Festival - February[53]
    • Assay Building (1906) demolished in 1984 for Life Sciences North (Gibb Hall)
  • 1985 - women's swimming dropped as a varsity sport (returns in 2004)
  • 1986 - Life Sciences North building completed - (renamed for former President Gibb in 1993)
    • men's swimming dropped as a varsity sport
  • 1987 - The School of Music is named after Lionel Hampton, becomes the Lionel Hampton School of Music
    • President Gibb's salary boosted by over 15%, to $77,928.[55]
    • total enrollment at 8,280 in spring[51]
  • 1989 - Elisabeth Zinser becomes 14th UI president; first female university president in state history
    • new UI Bookstore completed, on former parking lot east of Student Union Building (SUB)
  • 1990 - original Tartan Turf of Kibbie Dome is replaced after 18 years
    • Business Technology Incubator building completed - March - Sweet Ave. & S. Main St.
    • campus post office station moved from library (lower NW corner) to new UI Bookstore building
  • 1992 - UI receives its own zip code: 83844 - November
  • 1993 - UI Library (1957) expanded by 50%, completed in fall - dedicated April 1994
    • Life Sciences North renamed for Richard D. Gibb (1928–94), former UI president (1977–89)
  • 1995 - College of Mines & Earth Resources' McClure Hall dedicated - September
    • resident undergraduate fees: $810 per semester [56]
    • total enrollment at 11,727 in fall[57]
  • 1996 - UI joins Big West Conference for athletics, returns to Division I-A after 18 years - July
    • originally admitted in 1973, when conference was the PCAA, but denied by state board of education[40]
    • outdoor track stadium named for new Olympic decathlon champion Dan O'Brien - September
    • Engineering/Physics building dedicated - October 4
  • 1998 - Vandal football team wins first Division I-A conference title and bowl game - (photo - town parade)
  • 1999 - renovation of Gauss-Johnson engineering labs completed - November
    • resident undergraduate fees: $1,068 per semester [58]
  • 2000 - Idaho Commons opens January 10, dedicated April 7 - east of UCC (now TLC)
    • College of Forestry, Wildlife, & Range Sciences (FWR) is renamed - becomes College of Natural Resources (CNR)
    • A doctored promotional photograph, where the faces of two minority students replaced the faces of white students, was found and removed from the website.[59]
  • 2001 - Cowan Spectrum debuts for basketball - February - an enclosed configuration for basketball in Kibbie Dome
    • Big West drops football after 2000 - UI becomes a "football only" member in Sun Belt for four seasons (2001–04)
    • College of Agriculture is renamed - becomes College of Agricultural and Life Sciences (CALS)
    • Agriculture Biotechnology Laboratory dedicated - October 28
    • East entrance to campus completed - Sweet Ave. @ S. Main Street
  • 2002 - Student Recreation Center - April - north of Theophilus Tower dorm; formerly the site of maintenance buildings.
    • Budget crisis forces reorganization of colleges - July 1
      • Letters & Science splits into College of Science and College of Letters, Arts, & Social Science (CLASS).
      • College of Mines & Earth Resources is eliminated, programs moved to either Science or Engineering
    • J.A. Albertson building completed (College of Business & Economics) - dedicated October 24
      directly west of Admin. Building, incorporated Admin. Annex (1950)
    • Park Village Apts. demolished (married & graduate housing - 1957) - 3rd & Home St.
  • 2003 - Living Learning Community - first 5 of 8 dormitories completed west of Line St., east of Theophilus Tower
    • Gault-Upham dormitory (1955) is demolished, site now an open area west of Living Learning Community
  • 2004 - Vandal Athletic Center - March 19, dedicated April 30 - enhancement of Kibbie Dome's East End Addition (1982).
    • women's swimming reintroduced in fall - (orig. 1972-85) - Title IX balance for additional football scholarships in Div I-A
    • final three units of Living Learning Center completed - former Gault-Upham dormitory (1955–2003) becomes open area
  • 2005 - UI joins the Western Athletic Conference (WAC) for all sports - July 1
    • infilled SprinTurf installed on varsity practice fields east of Kibbie Dome - August - replaced limited-use natural grass;
      - two fields, each 75 yards (69 m) in length with a goal post, lighting, & fencing; now available for intramurals and recreation.
    • Teaching & Learning Center opens, formerly the University Classroom Center (1965–2003)
  • 2007 - Kibbie Dome installs infilled "Real Grass Pro" - August - similar to FieldTurf, replaced the 1990 AstroTurf
    • resident undergraduate fees: $2100 per semester [60]
  • 2009 - first phase of safety improvements for Kibbie Dome; west wall is replaced (wood to non-flammable translucent) and field-level exits are added.
  • 2010 - first chilled water tank constructed at golf course's fourth tee, SW corner of Nez Perce Drive and Perimeter Road.
    • 90 feet (27 m) in height, volume of 2,000,000 US gallons (7,600 m3)[61]
  • 2011 - Navy ROTC building (1942) damaged by accidental fire in June; razed in August [62]
    • second phase of safety improvements to Kibbie Dome; east wall is replaced to match west wall (2009);
      new press box built above north grandstand, former press box above south grandstand is converted to premium seating (Litehouse Center)
    • Dan O'Brien Track Stadium undergoes major renovation in preparation for hosting the WAC championships in spring 2012
  • 2012 - During the vetting process in February, the State Board of Education removed the term "flagship" from the proposed mission statement because of a desire to not have comparative and competitive terms in mission statements.[63][64] Prior to this decision, higher education scholars and administrators outside the state considered UI to be the state's flagship university;[65][66][67] it remains to be seen if the removal of the state's official designation will alter wider opinions.

References[edit]

  1. ^ lib.uidaho.edu - special collections - timeline - accessed 2010-04-06
  2. ^ About the UI - A Brief UI History[dead link]
  3. ^ uidaho.edu timeline
  4. ^ a b c "Alumni: class of 1896". 1906 Gem of the Mountains, University of Idaho yearbook. 1905. p. 55. 
  5. ^ a b c 1907-1957 Historical Events, Centennial 1907 - 2007 College of Engineering, University of Idaho[dead link]
  6. ^ University of Idaho Library Special Collections and Archives - Home
  7. ^ "Idaho enrollment gain 12 per cent". Lewiston Morning Tribune. October 1, 1936. p. 8. 
  8. ^ "Enrollment down". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Associated Press. November 5, 1941. p. 5. 
  9. ^ "University of Idaho male enrollment up". Lewiston Morning Tribune. December 12, 1945. p. 10. 
  10. ^ "Bears take Pacific Coast championship with win over Idaho, 55 to 36". Spokesman-Review. March 12, 1946. p. 9. 
  11. ^ The Borah Foundation at the University of Idaho
  12. ^ "Idaho rolls may set mark|August 6, 1956". Spokesman-Review. p. 6. 
  13. ^ "Vandals drops ring program". Eugene Register-Guard. Associated Press. June 9, 1954. p. 8D. 
  14. ^ "Money reasons cause Idaho to drop boxing". Lewiston Morning Tribune. Associated Press. June 9, 1954. p. 9. 
  15. ^ "Blaze fatal to 3 Idaho students; chief declares arsonist to blame". Spokane Daily Chronicle. October 19, 1956. p. 1. 
  16. ^ "Fatal U-I blaze is set by gasoline, is hint". Spokesman-Review. October 20, 1956. p. 1. 
  17. ^ "Dormitory fire at University of Idaho snuffs out three lives". Spokane Daily Chronicle. October 19, 1956. p. 10. 
  18. ^ "Scenes of tragedy at University of Idaho that took three lives". Spokesman-Review. October 20, 1956. p. 16. 
  19. ^ "Student is held in University of Idaho arson case". Spokesman-Review. November 21, 1956. p. 1. 
  20. ^ "Idaho arson suspect accused of murder". Spokesman-Review. Associated Press. December 1, 1956. p. 6. 
  21. ^ "Killer is sullen as verdict is read". Spokane Daily Chronicle. April 13, 1957. p. 1. 
  22. ^ "Arson-killer gets up to 25 years". Spokane Daily Chronicle. April 15, 1957. p. 1. 
  23. ^ Derr, Allen (September 29, 1956). "New Plymouth youth sets new enrollment mark at Idaho". Lewiston Morning Tribune. p. 3. 
  24. ^ "University of Idaho enrollment at 3,906". Lewiston Morning Tribune. October 3, 1959. p. 12. 
  25. ^ "Idaho is restored to major grid status". Spokesman-Review. July 1, 1969. p. 10. 
  26. ^ "Idaho reclassified as major college". Tri City Herald. Associated Press. July 1, 1969. p. 20. 
  27. ^ Lewiston Morning Tribune = University given permission to establish building fund through higher student fees - 1963-12-06 - p.8
  28. ^ "Student total reaches 4,817 at university". Spokane Daily Chronicle. February 10, 1965. p. 3. 
  29. ^ lib.uidaho.edu - UI buildings - W - accessed 2010-03-21
  30. ^ lib.uidaho.edu - UI buildings - S - accessed 2010-03-21
  31. ^ "Space problem for engineers to end in 1968". Lewiston Morning Tribune. August 18, 1967. p. 11. 
  32. ^ "Buchanan to keynote rites at lab". Spokane Daily Chronicle. May 6, 1969. p. 7. 
  33. ^ lib.uidaho.edu - UI buildings - T - accessed 2010-03-21
  34. ^ lib.uidaho.edu - UI buildings - A - accessed 2010-03-21
  35. ^ "Enrollment record set at university". Lewiston Morning Tribune. October 4, 1969. p. 9. 
  36. ^ Lewiston Morning Tribune - Regents relax university dorm rules - 1971-05-07 - p.18
  37. ^ "Board is seeking help for Vandals". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Associated Press. October 20, 1972. p. 18. 
  38. ^ Khan, Nahid (March 12, 1993). "Former UI law dean Menard dies at 74". Moscow-Pullman Daily News. p. 3A. 
  39. ^ "Idaho is given PCAA bid". Spokesman-Review. June 8, 1973. p. 24. 
  40. ^ a b Shelledy, Jay (July 16, 1973). "Idaho will remain in the Big Sky". Lewiston Morning Tribune. p. 4. 
  41. ^ Shelledy, Jay (July 18, 1973). "Knecht predicts Idaho will quit football by 1976". Lewiston Morning Tribune. p. 17. 
  42. ^ University of Idaho Library Special Collections and Archives - Home
  43. ^ "Theater tag due Hartung". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Associated Press. September 3, 1977. p. 3. 
  44. ^ "Idaho off probation, loop titles dwindle". Lewiston Morning Tribune. Associated Press. May 15, 1974. p. 13. 
  45. ^ "Baseball axed in Big Sky". Lewiston Morning Tribune. May 29, 1974. p. 15. 
  46. ^ "Tuition increase is due". Spokesman-Review. January 24, 1976. p. A4. 
  47. ^ "Idaho enrollment down|October 8, 1976". Spokesman-Review. Associated Press. p. 10. 
  48. ^ Lewiston Morning Tribune Gibb say in-state tuition is a real possibility - 1978-11-15 - p.15A
  49. ^ "University enrollment up five percent". Lewiston Morning Tribune. October 12, 1979. p. 1B. 
  50. ^ Lewiston Monrning Tribune - UI drops baseball, but booster group mounts fund drive - 1980-05-13 - p.C1
  51. ^ a b "Idaho Board of Education". (Moscow) Idahonian. March 8, 1987. p. 7. 
  52. ^ Today@Idaho - News Article
  53. ^ Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival - history - accessed 2010-04-09
  54. ^ Spokesman-Review - 1986-01-21 - p.A11
  55. ^ Devlin, Sherry (June 26, 1987). "College chiefs get pay raises". Spokesman-Review. p. 17. 
  56. ^ Lewiston Morning Tribune - Board members ponder student fees - 1995-05-55 - p.9A
  57. ^ "Enrollment's down at area universities". Lewiston Morning Tribune. Associated Press. October 10, 1996. p. 7A. 
  58. ^ Lewiston Morning Tribune - Idaho schools losing nonresidents - 1998-04-16 - p.C1
  59. ^ University removes doctored photo from Internet
  60. ^ students.uidaho.edu - student fee schedule 2006-07 - accessed 2012-03-12
  61. ^ Chilled Water Storage Tank, Facilities Services, University of Idaho (archived from the original on 2010-05-28).
  62. ^ Go Vandals.net - 2011-08-13
  63. ^ State Board of Education removes 'flagship' from University of Idaho's mission | University of Idaho | Idahostatesman.com
  64. ^ Westerberg, Richard (4 March 2012). "Idaho SBOE President". Idaho Statesman. Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  65. ^ Ranking the Nation’s Flagship State Universities and Historically Black Colleges on Their Success in Enrolling Low-Income Students
  66. ^ "America's Top Colleges - Forbes". Forbes. 
  67. ^ "LSU Flagship Agenda - Peers Institutions". Louisiana State University.