Timeline of arcade video game history

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This is a timeline of notable events in the history of arcade video games and system boards.

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Part of a series on:
History of video games

Pre-golden age (1971-1977)[edit]

1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
  • Taito releases Western Gun, the first video game to depict human-to-human combat.[9][10] Designed by Tomohiro Nishikado, the game had two distinct joystick controls per player, with one eight-way joystick for moving the computerized cowboy around on the screen and the other for changing the shooting direction.[11][12]
  • November: Midway MFG. releases Gun Fight, an adaptation of Taito's Western Gun and the first arcade video game to use a microprocessor, which the original incarnation did not use, allowing for improved graphics and smoother animation.[13]
1976
1977

Golden age (1978-1986)[edit]

1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986

Post-golden age (1987-present)[edit]

1987
1988
1989
1990
  • Race Drivin' is released by Atari Games and is an arcade sequel to Hard Drivin'.
  • Pit-Fighter is released by Atari Games and is the second fighting game to use fully digitized graphics, two years before Midway's Mortal Kombat.
  • Air Inferno is released by Taito and is the last game running on the 3D hardware Taito Air System.
  • Galaxian³ is released by Namco as a video game theme park attraction, based on Namco System 21 hardware, and is the first to feature 8 or more players. This game is a sequel to the Galaxian series and is known for combining pre-rendered laserdisc background video with 3D polygonal graphics. It was later released as a scaled-down arcade cabinet for public arcades in 1994.
  • NAM-1975 is released by SNK and is the first game running on a Neo Geo hardware, which became a standardized arcade platform throughout the 90s to the early 2000s. Many 2D fighting games like Fatal Fury, World Heroes, Samurai Showdown and The King of Fighters ran on this hardware, and it was very popular in the arcades for its time.
1991
1992
1993
1994
  • Killer Instinct is released, the first arcade game with a hard disk, up to that point the game with the highest quality graphics pre-rendered by a rendering program, featuring to this day the highest quality use of the movie background technique.
  • Namco releases Tekken, another fighting game.
1995
1996
1998
  • Konami releases Dance Dance Revolution, an arcade game with four arrow pads that the players used to "dance." This game would create many sequels and spin-offs.
  • Gauntlet Legends is released by Atari Games and it is the first game in the Gauntlet series to be produced in 3D and is the last Gauntlet game relassed by Atari Games.
1999
  • Rush 2049 is released, the last arcade game to bear the Atari Games logo. Atari Games in Milpitas is renamed Midway Games West, and closes its coin-op product development division.
  • Hydro Thunder is released by Midway Games. A 3D speedboat racing game and one of the first to one on a Windows based PC hardware called Quicksilver II. Many arcade games later in the decade soon followed. The game was one of Midway's most successful arcade games.
2000
2001
  • Namco releases Tekken 4, the first talking game to feature almost all characters talking to one another.
2002
  • Arctic Thunder : Special Edition is released and is the last arcade game by Midway Games and runs on a PC based Hardware Midway Graphite. It's arcade division was later shut down.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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External links[edit]