Timeline of women's basketball

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1881–1890[edit]

1885

1891–1900[edit]

1891

1892

A photograph of Senda Berenson, a pioneer of women's basketball, who authored the first Basketball Guide for Women
Senda Berenson

1893

1894

  • RULE Change—Dribbling and guarding another player prohibited[7]

1895

Clara Gregory Baer's original rules of Newcomb ball
  • Clara Gregory Baer writes the first book of rules for women's basketball.[8][9]
  • The first public women's basketball game in the South is played at a men's only club, the Southern Athletic Club.[6]

1896

  • First intercollegiate contest between the University of California, Berkeley and Stanford was held on April 4, 1896. Stanford won, 2–1.[10](Grundy, p. 19)(Miller, p. 29)

1897

  • First recorded women's basketball game in Australia, played in Victoria, using wet paper bags for baskets.[11]
  • First women's high school game between Austin High and Oak Park. Won by Austin 16–4.[12]

1899

  • Senda Berenson publishes the first issue of Basketball Guide for Women, which she would edit and update for eighteen years. These rules, with minor modifications, would remain in use until the 1960s.[4]
  • Stanford abolishes intercollegiate competition of women. (The players formed an independent club team).(Grundy, p. 21)

1901–1910[edit]

1904

  • Stanford rescinds the prohibition against intercollegiate competition of women.(Grundy, p. 21)

1906

  • Women's basketball featured on the cover of the Saturday Evening Post
Saturday evening post 1906 Oct 06 featuring women's basketball

1911–1920[edit]

1913

  • RULE Change—A single dribble is permitted as long as it bounces knee-high[7]

1915

  • The Edmonton Grads, then known as the Commercial High School basketball team, won the Intercollegiate Basketball League. They would go on to play as the Grads, with a record of 502–20 between 1915 and 1940.(Hall, p. x,263) James Naismith would go on to refer to them as "the finest basketball team that ever stepped out on a floor". (Hall, p. x)

1916

  • RULE Change—Coaching from sidelines prohibited during game, except for halftime[7]

1918

  • RULE Change—The bottom of the basket is removed. Substitutes allowed for first time (but cannot re-enter game). The bounce pass is allowed[7]

1921–1930[edit]

1926

  • First AAU Women's Tournament, won by Pasadena Athletic & Country Club.[13][14]

1927

  • RULE Change—Players must wear a number on the back[7]

1931–1940[edit]

1932

  • RULE Change—guarding another player first allowed[7](Miller, p. 30)
  • FIBA, the International Basketball Federation, is formed in Geneva.[15]

1936

Uniform worn by the All American Red Heads Team
  • RULE Change—first the first time a guard, called a "rover" was allowed to play the entire court[16]
  • The All American Red Heads Team a barnstorming professional team was formed. They would go on to tour the country for 50 years, playing men's team using men's rules.(Miller, p. 31)(Grundy, pp. 104–105)

1938

  • RULE Change—The court is now divided into two sections, rather than three. Team size remains six players each.[7]

1941–1950[edit]

1947

  • RULE Change—Players must wear a number on the front and the back[7]

1949

  • Hazel Walker became the first woman to own a professional basketball team, the Arkansas Travelers.[17]
  • RULE Change—Players now allowed a two-bounce dribble. (Continuous dribble used in experimental season, but not adopted)[7]

1951–1960[edit]

1951

  • RULE Change—Coaching from sidelines during time outs permitted[7]

1953

  • First FIBA World Championship for Women[18]
Gold—USA
Silver—Chile
Bronze—France

1955

  • Missouri (Arledge) Morris—named an All-American, the first black AAU All-American[19]
  • RULE Change—Three second rule implemented. Players in the offensive lane may not hold the ball for more than three seconds.[7]

1957

  • FIBA World Championship for Women[20]
Gold—USA
Silver—Soviet Union
Bronze—Czechoslovakia

1958

1959

  • FIBA World Championship for Women[21]
Gold—Soviet Union
Silver—Bulgaria
Bronze—Czechoslovakia

1961–1970[edit]

1962

  • First women officials in AAU national tournament—Fran Koening and Carol Walter(Miller, p. 32)
  • RULE Change—Two "rovers" allowed (players permitted to run the entire court)[7]

1964

  • FIBA World Championship for Women[22]
Gold—Soviet Union
Silver—Czechoslovakia
Bronze—Bulgaria

1966

  • RULE Change—Continuous dribble allowed[7]

1967

  • FIBA World Championship for Women[23]
Gold—Soviet Union
Silver—Korea
Bronze—Czechoslovakia

1968

  • RULE Change—Coaching from sidelines during game permitted[7]

1969

A photograph of Nera White, female basketball player in the Hall of Fame
Nera White

1970

1971–1980[edit]

1971

  • FIBA World Championship for Women[27]
Gold—Soviet Union
Silver—Czechoslovakia
Bronze—Brazil

1972

1973

1974

1975

  • The first nationally televised game is played by Maryland and Immaculata. Some source report that Immaculata won 80–48,[29][30] while others report 85–63.[31][32]
  • First Kodak All-American team is named.[33]
  • FIBA World Championship for Women[34]
Gold—Soviet Union
Silver—Japan
Bronze—Czechoslovakia

1976

  • First Olympic competition for women[35]
Gold—Soviet Union
Silver—USA
Bronze—Bulgaria

1977

1978

1979

  • FIBA World Championship for Women[39]
Gold—USA
Silver—Korea
Bronze—Canada

1980

  • Olympic competition for women[40]
Gold—Soviet Union
Silver—Bulgaria
Bronze—Yugoslavia

1981–1990[edit]

1981

1982

A photograph of the Louisiana Tech women's basketball team which won the first NCAA division I Women's Basketball Tournament
Louisiana Tech–1982 National Champions

1983

  • FIBA World Championship for Women[48]
Gold—Soviet Union
Silver—USA
Bronze—Chile

1984

  • RULE Change—The ball circumference for NCAA play is reduced by one inch (to 28.5–29 inches) compared to the ball used previously, and used by men. This size ball is also called size 6.[7]
  • Olympic competition for women[49]
Gold—USA
Silver—Korea
Bronze—China

1985

1986

Texas, the 1986 National Championship team team, in front of the main tower, lit up with #1
  • FIBA World Championship for Women[51]
Gold—USA
Silver—Soviet Union
Bronze—Canada

1987

1988

  • Olympic competition for women[52]
Gold—USA
Silver—Yugoslavia
Bronze—Soviet Union

1989

1990

Stanford Cardinal team with National Championship Trophy
  • FIBA World Championship for Women[53]
Gold—USA
Silver—Yugoslavia
Bronze—Cuba

1991–2000[edit]

1991

1992

  • Olympic competition for women[54]
Gold—Com. of Independent States(CIS)
Silver—China
Bronze—USA

1993

1994

  • FIBA World Championship for Women[55]
Gold—Brazil
Silver—China
Bronze—Cuba

1995

1996

  • Olympic competition for women[56]
Gold—USA
Silver—Brazil
Bronze—Australia
  • The WNBA is founded, with eight initial teams. Sheryl Swoopes is the first player signed.[57]
  • The American Basketball League (ABL) formed, a professional basketball league for women in the United States. It lasted two full seasons, and suspended operations in the third.[58][59]

1997

1998

Gold—USA
Silver—Russia
Bronze—Australia

1999

2000

  • Olympic competition for women[64]
Gold—USA
Silver—Australia
Bronze—Brazil

2001–2010[edit]

2001

2002

  • FIBA World Championship for Women[68]
Gold—USA
Silver—Russia
Bronze—Australia

2003

2004

  • Olympic competition for women[72]
Gold—USA
Silver—Australia
Bronze—Russia

2005

2006

A photograph of the Australian National women's basketball team which won the 2006 FIBA World Championship for Women in basketball
Australia women's national basketball team, celebrating after being awarded the gold medals for winning the 2006 FIBA World Championship for Women in basketball
  • FIBA World Championship for Women[75]
Gold—Australia
Silver—Russia
Bronze—USA

2007

2008

  • Olympic competition for women[78]
Gold—USA
Silver—Australia
Bronze—Russia

2009

The players, coaches, and other staff of the 2008-2009 UConn Huskies, winners of the 2009 national championship

2010

  • FIBA World Championship for Women[81]
Gold—USA
Silver—Czech Republic
Bronze—Spain

2011–2020[edit]

2011

2012

  • Olympic competition for women[84]
Gold—USA
Silver—France
Bronze—Australia
  • First women's game played on an aircraft carrier.[86]

2013

2014

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Hult, p. 54
  2. ^ "Dr. James Naismith's Original 13 Rules of Basket Ball". USA Basketball. Retrieved 2012-10-27. 
  3. ^ Hult, p. 24
  4. ^ a b Porter 2005, p. 1
  5. ^ Hult, p. 25
  6. ^ a b "Historical Timeline 1891-1962". Women's Basketball Hall of Fame. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r "Playing Rules History". NCAA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  8. ^ Hult, p. 28
  9. ^ Porter 2005, p. 20
  10. ^ Hult, p. 427
  11. ^ Taylor, Tracy (November 2001). "Gendering Sport: The Development of Netball in Australia". Sporting Traditions, Journal of the Australian Society for Sports History 18 (1): 59. 
  12. ^ Lindberg, Richard (1997). The armchair companion to Chicago sports. Nashville, Tenn. Kansas City, Mo: Cumberland House Distributed to the trade by Andrews & McMeel. p. 256. ISBN 9781888952605. 
  13. ^ Ikard, p. 13
  14. ^ Ikard, p. 215
  15. ^ "FIBA's 80th Anniversary Celebration". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  16. ^ Ikard, p. 41
  17. ^ Ikard, p. 26
  18. ^ "1953 World Championship for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  19. ^ Ikard, p. 185
  20. ^ "1957 World Championship for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  21. ^ "1959 World Championship for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  22. ^ "1964 World Championship for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  23. ^ "1967 World Championship for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  24. ^ Ikard, p. 161
  25. ^ Ikard, pp. 209–215
  26. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y "Pre-NCAA Statistical Leaders and AIAW Results". NCAA. Retrieved 31 Oct 2012. 
  27. ^ "1971 World Championship for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  28. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao "Past Champions". Canadian Interuniversity Sport - All. Retrieved 31 Oct 2012. 
  29. ^ GONZALES, PATRICK (January 29, 2005). "Lights, Camera, Action". Lubbock Avalanche-Journal. Retrieved 4 Dec 2012. 
  30. ^ GINSBURG, DAVID. "First women's college basketball game on national TV was hard sell". ACC. Retrieved 4 Dec 2012. 
  31. ^ "PSU’s JoePa era stretches generations". NCAA.com. Retrieved 4 Dec 2012. 
  32. ^ "The History of Women's Basketball". WNBA.com. Retrieved 4 Dec 2012. 
  33. ^ Hult, p. 316
  34. ^ "1975 World Championship for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  35. ^ "1976 Olympic Games: Tournament for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  36. ^ Haskell Cohen (April 9, 1977). "Parade's All-America High School Girls Basketball Team (1977)". Parade Magazine/Modesto Bee. Retrieved November 4, 2012. 
  37. ^ Hult, p. 317,430
  38. ^ a b Hult, p. 320
  39. ^ "1979 World Championship for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  40. ^ "1980 Olympic Games: Tournament for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  41. ^ "Timeline". Australian Institute of Sport. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  42. ^ "About Us". Women's Basketball Coaches Association. Retrieved 3 Jul 2014. 
  43. ^ Women's National Basketball League (Australia). National Library of Australia. Retrieved 2012-11-17
  44. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag "Past Champions". Basketball Australia. Retrieved 3 Apr 2014. 
  45. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag "Championship History". NCAA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  46. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af "Championship History". NCAA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  47. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af "Championship History". NCAA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  48. ^ "1983 World Championship for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  49. ^ "1984 Olympic Games: Tournament for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  50. ^ a b Skaine, p. 52
  51. ^ "1986 World Championship for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  52. ^ "1988 Olympic Games: Tournament for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  53. ^ "1990 World Championship for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  54. ^ "1992 Olympic Games: Tournament for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  55. ^ "1994 World Championship for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  56. ^ "1996 Olympic Games: Tournament for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  57. ^ a b "WNBA History/Timeline". WNBA. Retrieved 4 Dec 2012. 
  58. ^ "Hartford/springfield In Women's League". Hartford Courant. February 21, 1996. Retrieved 28 Oct 2012. 
  59. ^ "Transactions". Hartford Courant. December 23, 1998. Retrieved 28 Oct 2012. 
  60. ^ "WNBA Playoffs History: 1997". WNBA. Retrieved 4 Dec 2012. 
  61. ^ "1998 World Championship for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  62. ^ "WNBA Playoffs History: 1998". WNBA. Retrieved 4 Dec 2012. 
  63. ^ "WNBA Playoffs History: 1999". WNBA. Retrieved 4 Dec 2012. 
  64. ^ "2000 Olympic Games: Tournament for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  65. ^ "Sun Devils Host Historical Outdoor Game". Sun Devil Athletics. Retrieved 10 Nov 2012. 
  66. ^ "WNBA Playoffs History: 2000". WNBA. Retrieved 4 Dec 2012. 
  67. ^ "WNBA Playoffs History: 2001". WNBA. Retrieved 4 Dec 2012. 
  68. ^ "2002 World Championship for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  69. ^ Lena Williams (April 4, 2002). "After 24 Years, Girls Get Their First Shot as McDonald's All-Americans". New York Times. Retrieved November 4, 2012. 
  70. ^ "WNBA Playoffs History: 2002". WNBA. Retrieved 4 Dec 2012. 
  71. ^ "WNBA Playoffs History: 2003". WNBA. Retrieved 4 Dec 2012. 
  72. ^ "2004 Olympic Games: Tournament for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  73. ^ "WNBA Playoffs History: 2004". WNBA. Retrieved 4 Dec 2012. 
  74. ^ "WNBA Playoffs History: 2005". WNBA. Retrieved 4 Dec 2012. 
  75. ^ "2006 World Championship for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  76. ^ "WNBA Playoffs History: 2006". WNBA. Retrieved 4 Dec 2012. 
  77. ^ "WNBA Playoffs History: 2007". WNBA. Retrieved 4 Dec 2012. 
  78. ^ "2008 Olympic Games: Tournament for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  79. ^ "WNBA Playoffs History: 2008". WNBA. Retrieved 5 Dec 2012. 
  80. ^ "WNBA Playoffs History: 2009". WNBA. Retrieved 5 Dec 2012. 
  81. ^ "2010 World Championship for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  82. ^ "WNBA Playoffs History: 2010". WNBA. Retrieved 5 Dec 2012. 
  83. ^ "WNBA Playoffs History: 2011". WNBA. Retrieved 5 Dec 2012. 
  84. ^ "2012 Olympic Games: Tournament for Women". FIBA. Retrieved 27 Oct 2012. 
  85. ^ "Fever finish off Lynx to win first WNBA championship". ESPN. Retrieved 5 Dec 2012. 
  86. ^ "Skylar Diggins leads Irish past Buckeyes in Carrier Classic". ESPN W. Retrieved 10 Nov 2012. 
  87. ^ Barrett, Jessica (2013-03-16). "CIS women's basketball: Lancers capture third straight Bronze Baby". ONTARIO UNIVERSITY ATHLETICS. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  88. ^ "Rule changes put 10-second backcourt limit in effect for first time" (Press release). NCAA. November 5, 2013. Retrieved December 20, 2013. 
  89. ^ Weisenweber, Tom (Mar 29, 2014). "http://www.patriotledger.com/article/20140329/SPORTS/303309994". The Patriot Ledger,. Gatehouse Media, Inc. Retrieved 2 Apr 2014. 
  90. ^ Bates, Greg (March 22, 2014). "Fairleigh Dickinson-Florham won NCAA Division 3 women's national championship". Retrieved 2 Apr 2014. 
  91. ^ "Lancers win fourth-straight Bronze Baby". University of Windsor. 2014-03-16. Retrieved 27 Mar 2014. 

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Grundy, Pamela (2005). Shattering the glass. New Press. ISBN 978-1-56584-822-1. 
  • Hall, M (2011). The Grads are playing tonight! : the story of the Edmonton Commercial Graduates Basketball Club. Edmonton: University of Alberta Press. ISBN 9780888646026. 
  • Hult, Joan S.; Trekell, Marianna (1991). A Century of women's basketball : from frailty to final four. Reston, Va: National Association for Girls and Women in Sport. ISBN 9780883144909. 
  • Ikard, Robert W. (2005). Just for Fun: The Story of AAU Women's Basketball. The University of Arkansas Press. ISBN 978-1-55728-889-9. 
  • Miller, Ernestine (2002). Making her mark : firsts and milestones in women's sports. Chicago: Contemporary Books. ISBN 9780071390538. 
  • Pennington, Richard (1998). Longhorn hoops: the history of Texas basketball. United States: University of Texas Press. ISBN 0-292-76585-1. 
  • David L. Porter, ed. (2005). Basketball: A Biographical Dictionary. Greenwood Press. ISBN 978-0-313-30952-6. 
  • Porter, Karra (2006). Mad seasons : the story of the first Women's Professional Basketball League, 1978-1981. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press. ISBN 9780803287891. 
  • Skaine, Rosemarie (2001). Women College Basketball Coaches. Foreword by Betty F. Jaynes. Jefferson, N.C: McFarland. ISBN 9780786409204. 
  • Su, Mila Chin Ying (May 2002). "Collegiate Women's Sports And A Guide To Collecting And Identifying Archival Materials". The Pennsylvania State University. Retrieved 2012-10-27.