Timeline of women rabbis in America

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

This is a timeline of women rabbis in America.

  • 1972: Sally Priesand became the first female rabbi ordained in America, and is believed to be only the second woman ever to be formally ordained in the history of Judaism.[1]
  • 1976: Michal Mendelsohn became the first presiding female rabbi in a North American congregation when she was hired by Temple Beth El Shalom in San Jose, California.[4][5]
  • 1977: Sandy Eisenberg Sasso and her husband Dennis Sasso became the first couple to serve jointly as rabbis when they were hired by Beth-El Zedeck in Indianapolis.[7]
  • 1985: Amy Eilberg became the first female rabbi in Conservative Judaism.[17]
  • 1986: Amy Perlin became the first female rabbi in America to start her own congregation, Temple B'nai Shalom in Fairfax Station, which she was the founding rabbi of in 1986.[18][19]
  • 1986: Leslie Alexander became the first female rabbi of a major Conservative Jewish synagogue in the United States in 1986 at Adat Ari El synagogue in North Hollywood.[20][21][22]
  • 1992: Karen Soria became the first female rabbi to serve in the U.S. Marines, which she did from 1992 until 1996.[32][33][34]
  • 1993: Chana Timoner became the first female rabbi to hold an active duty assignment as a chaplain in the U.S. Army.[37][38]
  • 1994: Laura Geller became the first woman to lead a major metropolitan congregation, specifically Temple Emanuel in Beverly Hills.[39][40]
  • 1999: Tamara Kolton became the very first rabbi of either sex in Humanistic Judaism.[46]
  • 2000: Helga Newmark, born in Germany, became the first female Holocaust survivor ordained as a rabbi. She was ordained in America.[47][48][49][50]
  • 2002: Pamela Frydman became the first female president of OHALAH (Association of Rabbis for Jewish Renewal.) [57]
  • 2003: Janet Marder was named the first female president of the Reform Movement's Central Conference of American Rabbis (CCAR) on March 26, 2003, making her the first woman to lead a major rabbinical organization and the first woman to lead any major Jewish co-ed religious organization in the United States.[58]
  • 2008: Julie Schonfeld was named the new executive vice president of the Conservative movement's Rabbinical Assembly, becoming the first female rabbi to serve in the chief executive position of an American rabbinical association.[64][65]
  • 2009: Alysa Stanton, born in Cleveland and ordained by a Reform Jewish seminary in Cincinnati, became the first African-American female rabbi.[66][67] Later in 2009 she began work as a rabbi at Congregation Bayt Shalom, a small majority-white synagogue in Greenville, North Carolina, making her the first African-American rabbi to lead a majority-white congregation.[68]
  • 2012: Ilana Mills was ordained, thus making her, Jordana Chernow-Reader, and Mari Chernow the first three female siblings in America to become rabbis.[70][71]
  • 2012: Emily Aviva Kapor, who had been ordained privately by a Conservadox rabbi in 2005, began living as a woman in 2012, thus becoming the first openly transgender female rabbi.[72]
  • 2013: In October 2013, Rabbi Deborah Waxman was designated president elect of the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College.[73][74] She took office in January, 2014. As the President, she is believed to be the first woman and first lesbian to lead a Jewish congregational union, and the first female rabbi and first lesbian to lead a Jewish seminary; the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College is both a congregational union and a seminary.[43][75]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Blau, Eleanor. "1st Woman Rabbi in U.S. Ordained; She May Be Only the Second in History of Judaism", The New York Times, June 4, 1972. Retrieved September 17, 2009. "Sally J. Priesand was ordained at the Isaac M. Wise Temple here today, becoming the first woman rabbi in this country and it is believed, the second in the history of Judaism."
  2. ^ O'Brien, Jodi A.; O'Brien, Jodi (2009). O'Brien, Jodi A., ed. Encyclopedia of gender and society, Volume 1. SAGE. p. 475. ISBN 978-1-4129-0916-7. 
  3. ^ "Celebrating Sandy Eisenberg Sasso, the first woman Reconstructionalist rabbi". jwa.org. May 19, 2010. Retrieved June 12, 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "22 Women Now Ordained As Rabbis Most of Them Do Not Have Pulpits". http://archive.jta.org. August 23, 1979. Retrieved June 12, 2013. 
  5. ^ "The little shul that could: With just seven members, San Jose congregation keeps chugging along". http://www.jweekly.com. February 14, 2013. Retrieved June 12, 2013. 
  6. ^ "Sandy Sasso ordained as first female Reconstructionist rabbi". http://jwa.org. Retrieved June 12, 2013. 
  7. ^ "Trail-blazing Rabbi Sandy Sasso retiring after 36 years". http://www.indystar.com. May 19, 2013. Retrieved June 12, 2013. 
  8. ^ The New York Times (18 August 1979). "First woman rabbi to head temple seeks to lead way for more women". The Ledger. Retrieved 21 July 2012. 
  9. ^ Schwartz, Penny (July 28, 2011). "In their 40s and 50s, embarking on second careers as rabbis". JTA. Retrieved August 2, 2013. 
  10. ^ Shaw, Dan (2008-02-03). "He Got His Workshop, She Got Her Privacy". The New York Times. Retrieved 2012-09-04. 
  11. ^ "Stephen Wise Synagogue > 4 Decades of Women Rabbis In the Rabbinate and SWFS". Swfs.org. Retrieved 2012-09-03. 
  12. ^ "Pioneering rabbi finds deep satisfaction in storytelling, living life...". http://www.fau.edu/library/br150.htm. January 2, 2000. Retrieved 2012-09-03. 
  13. ^ a b "Bonnie Koppell". Jewishvirtuallibrary.org. 1981-05-26. Retrieved 2011-11-25. 
  14. ^ a b "Rabbi Bonnie Koppell: About Me". http://www.azrabbi.com. Retrieved August 31, 2013. 
  15. ^ Yiddishe Mamas: The Truth About the Jewish Mother, by Marnie Winston-Macauley - Google Books, pg. 195. Books.google.com. 2007. Retrieved 2011-11-25. 
  16. ^ "Out and Ordained: New York’s Jewish Theological Seminary graduates its first openly lesbian rabbi;Powered by Google Docs". Lilith Magazine;Docs.google.com. Summer 2011. Retrieved 2012-03-04. 
  17. ^ "Amy Eilberg". http://jwa.org/. Retrieved 2013-04-20. 
  18. ^ "Temple B'nai Shalom - Northern VA Reform Synagogue - Clergy". Tbs-online.org. Retrieved 2013-04-20. 
  19. ^ "Building a community of women - Washington Jewish Week - Online Edition - Rockville, MD". Washington Jewish Week. 2012-11-28. Retrieved 2013-04-20. 
  20. ^ Idelle Davidson (20 November 1986). "Rabbi Reaches Her Pulpit at End of a Long, Circuitous Path". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 5 April 2013. 
  21. ^ By JUDITH CUMMINGS, Special to the New York Times (1986-08-03). "Milestone For Conservative Judaism". NYTimes.com. Retrieved 2013-09-08. 
  22. ^ "First Woman Rabbi of Major Conservative Synagogue Leads Services". Apnewsarchive.com. 1986-08-02. Retrieved 2013-09-08. 
  23. ^ a b Lance Cummins, Instant Impact Designs, webmaster@thecitizennews.com (1999-07-09). "South side's first Jewish congregation ready to move forward". Thecitizen.com. Retrieved 2013-09-08. 
  24. ^ Goldman, Ari L. (1986-06-18). "Issue Of Women As Rabbis Breaks Up Jewish Unit". NYTimes.com. Retrieved 2013-09-08. 
  25. ^ Encyclopedia of Women and Religion in North America, pg. 553. - Google Books. Books.google.com. 2006. Retrieved 2013-09-08. 
  26. ^ "Rumor has it ... - Minnesota Women's Press - St. Paul, MN". Womenspress.com. Retrieved 2013-09-08. 
  27. ^ "Rabbi Offner". http://urj.org. 2008. Retrieved September 13, 2013. 
  28. ^ "Rabbis in Social Action". Shir Tikvah. 2013-02-14. Retrieved 2013-09-08. 
  29. ^ Dana Evan Kaplan Contemporary American Judaism: transformation and renewal Columbia University Press, 2009 ISBN 0231137281, p. 255
  30. ^ Our Roots. Shir Tikvah. Retrieved on 2010-11-30.
  31. ^ ""Coming Out" in the Jewish Family". http://lilith.org. Summer 1989. Retrieved 2013-09-08. 
  32. ^ "Staff Biographies". www.omjs.ca. Retrieved 2011-07-21. 
  33. ^ "The Canadian Jewish News - Winnipeg rabbi served in the marines, navy". Cjnews.com. 2008-10-30. Retrieved 2011-07-21. 
  34. ^ "Rabbi tackles LGBT in Jewish life | Jewish Tribune". Jewishtribune.ca. 2013-04-16. Retrieved 2013-09-08. 
  35. ^ "The Sisterhood 50: America's Influential Women Rabbis, dated 2010". Forward.com. Published July 21, 2010, issue of July 30, 2010. Retrieved 2013-09-08. 
  36. ^ Galludet University website, "Pre-Passover seder hosted by the Washington Society of Jewish Deaf"[dead link]
  37. ^ "Chana Timoner – Orlando Sentinel". Articles.orlandosentinel.com. July 18, 1998. Retrieved November 10, 2011. 
  38. ^ "Chana Timoner, 46, Rabbi and Chaplain, Dies – New York Times". The New York Times. July 17, 1998. Retrieved November 10, 2011. 
  39. ^ "Rabbi Laura Geller | Rabbi Jonathan Aaron | Rabbi Jill Zimmerman | Los Angeles". Tebh.org. 2006-08-24. Retrieved 2011-12-16. 
  40. ^ "Laura Geller | Jewish Women's Archive". Jwa.org. Retrieved 2011-12-16. 
  41. ^ "Mispacha: A virtual community for real Jewish families". http://www.mishpacha.org. Retrieved 2013-09-08. 
  42. ^ a b "Rabbi Dianne Cohler-Esses". Mechonhadar.org. Retrieved 2012-11-17. 
  43. ^ a b Dianne Cohler-Esses (2011-05-24). "Connecting the World to Jewish News, Culture, and Opinion". The Jewish Week. Retrieved 2012-11-17. 
  44. ^ "Names First Syrian Jewish Female Rabbi to be Director of Education". Romemu. 2012-08-08. Retrieved 2012-11-17. 
  45. ^ September 15, 2005 (2005-09-15). "Cynthia Culpeper Dies, Rabbi Who Battled AIDS". The Jewish Exponent. Retrieved 2012-10-14. 
  46. ^ "Society for Humanistic Judaism - Rabbis and Leadership". Shj.org. Retrieved 2012-03-12. 
  47. ^ "HUC-JIR: Press Room - In Memoriam: Rabbi Helga Newmark, z''l". Huc.edu. 2012-03-08. Retrieved 2013-09-08. 
  48. ^ "docs.google.com;"Stolen Childhood: A Survivor of the Holocaust"". docs.google.com;McCall’s Magazine. August 1994. Retrieved 2013-09-08. 
  49. ^ "Helga Newmark, rabbi late in life, dies". NorthJersey.com. 2012-03-14. Retrieved 2013-09-08. 
  50. ^ "Helga Newmark, rabbi late in life, dies : page 2". NorthJersey.com. 2012-03-14. Retrieved 2013-09-08. 
  51. ^ ""Troublemaker" Women Honored, Receive Ivy | auburn". Auburnseminary.org. 2009-08-22. Retrieved 2012-02-09. 
  52. ^ "This Week in History - Angela Warnick Buchdahl invested as first Asian-American cantor | Jewish Women's Archive". Jwa.org. 1999-05-16. Retrieved 2012-02-09. 
  53. ^   (2011-03-15). "Women's History Month: Unique Rabbi-Cantor Follows Her Own Melody". NY1. Retrieved 2013-09-08. 
  54. ^ "Angela Buchdahl | Profiles | Finding Your Roots". PBS. Retrieved 2013-09-08. 
  55. ^ "Our Clergy: Angela Warnick Buchdahl, Senior Cantor", Central Synagogue Web site
  56. ^ "The Sisterhood 50 –". Forward.com. Published July 21, 2010, issue of July 30, 2010. Retrieved 2012-02-09. 
  57. ^ "Women of the Wall". Women of the Wall. Retrieved 2010-11-19. 
  58. ^ "Rabbi Janet Marder becomes president of Central Conference of American Rabbis (CCAR)". Jwa.org. 2003-03-26. Retrieved 2010-11-19. 
  59. ^ "Wise Temple". Wise Temple. 2012-04-13. Retrieved 2013-09-08. 
  60. ^ "Reform Judaism Magazine - This Rabbi Wears Combat Boots". Reformjudaismmag.org. Spring 2010. Retrieved 2013-09-08. 
  61. ^ Jeff Kunerth 11:27 a.m. EDT, April 1, 2013 (2013-04-01). "Air Force gets its first Jewish female chaplin". OrlandoSentinel.com. Retrieved 2013-09-08. 
  62. ^ "Female rabbi joins US Air Force - Israel Jewish Scene, Ynetnews". Ynetnews.com. 04.02.13. Retrieved 2013-09-08. 
  63. ^ "Kehilla Community Synagogue - Spiritual Leadership". Kehillasynagogue.org. Retrieved 2011-11-19. 
  64. ^ "A White Plains rabbi replaces a White Plains rabbi as head of the Rabbinical Assembly | Blogging Religiously". Religion.lohudblogs.com. 2008-10-29. Retrieved 2012-07-07. 
  65. ^ November 4, 2008 (2008-11-04). "News Briefs - Sun Sentinel". Articles.sun-sentinel.com. Retrieved 2012-07-07. 
  66. ^ Kaufman, David (June 6, 2009). "Introducing America's First Black, Female Rabbi". Time. Archived from the original on 11 June 2009. Retrieved June 6, 2009. 
  67. ^ Whitaker, Carrie (June 6, 2009). "First Black Female Jewish Rabbi Ordained". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Retrieved June 6, 2009. 
  68. ^ "White House steps up Jewish outreach amid criticism of Mideast policy". CNN. May 26, 2010. 
  69. ^ Amy Stone (Summer 2011). "Out and Ordained". Lilith. Retrieved 2011-11-19. 
  70. ^ Heller, Rachel (2012-04-23). "Sister Act, Part Three ‹ Tribe Magazine". Tribejournal.com. Retrieved 2013-09-08. 
  71. ^ "Rabbinic sisterhood: three rabbis now in Chernow family". The American Israelite. 2012-06-13. Retrieved 2013-09-08. 
  72. ^ "Emily Aviva Kapor: Creating a Jewish Community for Trans Women". The Forward. July 15, 2013. Retrieved October 25, 2013. 
  73. ^ "Reconstructionists Pick First Woman, Lesbian As Denominational Leader". The Jewish Week. Retrieved 2013-10-12. 
  74. ^ "Trailblazing Reconstructionist Deborah Waxman Relishes Challenges of Judaism –". Forward.com. Retrieved 2013-10-12. 
  75. ^ "RRC Announces New President Elect" (Press release). Wyncote, PA (USA): Reconstructionist Rabbinical College. 2013-10-09. Retrieved 2013-10-16.